About RecipeReminiscing

portait_recipeHello webwanderer, welcome to RecipeReminiscing. I’m TidiousTed and I run this blog. I’m not a chef or cook neither have I any formal training or education in catering or cooking. I’m just a graphic designer and web designer  who likes to cook. A lot of this blog is based on my large collection of old cook books in Norwegian, Swedish, Danish and English. The rest of the post comes from old ads and roaming the net looking for interesting recipes. I’m interested in food history and soda and soft drink history too so there will be posts on this from time to time as well. I hope you’ll enjoy your stay here – Ted

Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome’s ‘Ketchup’ Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredient

An article by Olga Oksman posted on theguardian.com
Wednesday 26 August 2015

Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome's 'Ketchup' Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredient

Garum and other similar fish-based sauces were the ketchup of the ancient world, mass produced in factories by the Romans, and sprinkled on anything savory. They usually made several versions: a dark-colored table condiment that was high in protein, a cooking sauce similar to Thai and Vietnamese fish sauces (sometimes called liquamen by historians, though often grouped together with garum), and a milder version called muria, explains food historian Sally Grainger. The fall of the Roman empire meant the end of its mass production, but the art of the fish sauce was not lost in Italy. The modern-day version, colatura di alici, is a saltier mixture of all three sauces.

Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome's 'Ketchup' Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredient

While Italy may not be the first place that comes to mind when thinking of fish sauce, several companies on the Amalfi coast continue the ancient traditions. Today’s colatura is a clear, amber liquid made from Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome's 'Ketchup' Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredientfermented, salted anchovies and sold in tiny, elegant glass bottles. It is often described as the great-grandfather of Worcestershire sauce. “There is only a difference of a few ingredients, but colatura tastes better,” Grace Singleton, managing partner at Zingerman’s Delicatessen, tells me.

Zingerman’s, based in Michigan, started carrying the condiment around 15 years ago, when co-founding partner Ari Weinzweig found himself in the Amalfi coast town of Cetara, where it has been made for generations. After tasting it for the first time, Weinzweig knew he had to carry it in his store. It took a year to get all the labelling right for US importation, but it was worth it. Since then, the sauce has had a steady following, Weinzweig tells me.

Everyone who has tried it remembers the exact moment when colatura di alici and taste buds first met. For Matt Armendariz, who runs the food blog Matt Bites, it was in Italy, in an aioli sauce. “My mind was blown. It had this umami flavor and I asked the chef why it was so delicious, and he said he used colatura di alici. I just fell in love with it,” Armendariz fondly recalls.

Garum jugs from PompeiiThe amber sauce, which is fermented traditionally in chestnut barrels, is an inexpensive way to add depth and flavor to dishes, says Singleton. A little glass bottle will set you back on average $15, but you only need a sprinkling to bring a new dimension to food.

It is also the key to a quick and simple pasta dish popular in the Amalfi coast. Any kind of long, thin pasta is mixed with garlic, chili-infused olive oil and a little colatura di alici for an unmistakable savory rich flavor that belies its simple ingredients. Armendariz recommends sprinkling it on ripe tomatoes or putting a few drops on grilled steaks and other meats to make the flavor pop. Singleton favors using it in place of salt in dishes, since it does double duty by both salting a dish and accentuating its flavors.

Despite its fishy origins, don’t think of it as a fish sauce, says Armendariz, who refers to the flavor enhancer as a “genie in a bottle” on his blog. It’s a true secret ingredient for the modern age, taken straight out of the ancient world.


In context

Roman Garum was a fermented fish sauce used as a condiment in the cuisines of ancient Greece, Rome, and Byzantium. Liquamen was a similar preparation, and at times the two were synonymous. Although it enjoyed its greatest popularity in the Roman world, the sauce was earlier used by the Greeks.

When mixed with wine (oenogarum, a popular Byzantine sauce), vinegar, black pepper, or oil, garum enhances the flavor of a wide variety of dishes, including boiled veal and steamed mussels, even pear-and-honey soufflé. Diluted with water (hydrogarum) it was distributed to Roman legions. Pliny (d. 79) remarked in his Natural History that it could be diluted to the colour of honey wine and drunk.

You might have noticed that Liquamen was listed among the
ingredients on my Medieval Monday post a few days ago.
You can find old recipes for Garum here

http://www.coquinaria.nl/english/recipes/garum.htm

and here

http://www.pompeii-food-and-drink.org/garum.htm

Ted

Successful Canning and Preserving from 1917 in PDF

Successful Canning and Preserving from 1917 in PDF

Successfull Canning
and Preserving
by Ola Powell

a book in the
Lippincott’s Home Manuales
series

Published by
J B Lippincot Co
in 1917


This book on classic canning and preserving counting more than
400 page  can be yours simply by clicking the icon below

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Norwegian Wheat Biscuits / Hvetekjeks

A classic Norwegian  biscuit recipe  found in “Den Store Bakeboken” (The Big Baking Book) published Schibstedt in 1978Norwegian Wheat Biscuits / Hvetekjeks

Biscuits, whether made with rye, oats or wheat, are very popular
in Norway. Any biscuit with good butter and Norwegian goat cheese
will bring good childhood memories for most of us. At least for me

Ted
Winking smile

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Onion Goulash / Løkgulasj

A dinner recipe with origins in Hungary found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for Busy People) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982
Onion Goulash / Løkgulasj

Goulash (Hungarian: gulyás [ˈɡujaːʃ]) is a soup or stew of meat and vegetables, seasoned with paprika and other spices. Originating from the medieval Kingdom of Hungary, goulash is also a popular meal in Central Europe, Eastern Europe, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Scandinavia and Southern Europe.

Its origin traces back to the 9th century to stews eaten by Hungarian shepherds. Back then, the cooked and flavored meat was dried with the help of the sun and packed into bags produced from sheep’s stomachs, needing only water to make it into a meal. It is one of the national dishes of Hungary and a symbol of the country.

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Warming Ginger Soda / Heit Ingefærdrikk

A classic summer drink perfect for picnics or outdoor
evening parties found on
goodhousekeeping.co.uk
Warming Ginger Soda / Heit Ingefærdrikk

A delicious old-fashioned drink, perfect to sip at a picnic
or on a summer evening party.

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French Chocolate / Fransk Sjokolade

A classic hot beverage recipe found in “Baker’s Favourite Chocolate Recipes” published by Baker’s Chocolate in 1936French Chocolate / Fransk Sjokolade

French Chocolate is a hot chocolate, de luxe. It is especially suitable for entertaining when the serving is done by the hostess, and makes an effective, gracious ceremony of afternoon refreshments

Accompaniments for this delicious beverage should be light and  dainty. Thin bread and butter sandwiches, unsweetened wafers, or sponge drops are excellent to serve.

Let this rich, satisfying French Chocolate do the honors at your next party – a bridge luncheon, afternoon, evening, or after-theatre party.

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Alliance Jam / Alliansesyltetøy

A fancy jam recipe found on frukt.no
Alliance Jam / Alliansesyltetøy

Making jams from different varieties of berries together is always a success. Try the mix you like the best. In this jam we used red currant, raspberry and black currant.

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Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

A medieval Roman recipe found on CookIt!
Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

This recipe illustrates the Roman love of dishes that could be dipped into sauces. A vast array dishes could be served in bowls and platters. Meat would be carved into small pieces, so that each guest only picks what he needs and dips the meat into the accompanying sauces served in little bowls.

The meat would be cooked over a raised brick hearth, on top of which was a charcoal fire. The meat was placed in a pan on a tripod placed over the fire or cooked directly on a grid. Also used were frying pans (pensa), deeper pans (patella and patina), mixing bowls (mortaria) with a spout for pouring.

The recipe given here is not meant to be cooked in a modern kitchen but on an open fire or on a charcoal grill. Roman cooks judged quantities by eye so measurements are not given. Apicius provides the ingredients for the sauce, this then accompanies pan- fried meat.

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The Plum Tart from “The Light Years” / Plummeterten fra "The Light Years"

A baking recipe inspired by literature found on theguardian.com
The Plum Tart from “The Light Years” / Plummeterten fra "The Light Years"

They all had dinner – fourteen of them round the immense three-pedestal table extended to its uttermost and even then they were crammed round it. They ate four roast chickens, bread sauce, mashed potato and runner beans followed by plum tart and what the Duchy called Shape – blancmange.

From “The Light Years” by Elizabeth Jane Howard

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Civil War Era Pinappleade / Ananasade fra Tiden Rundt den Amerikanske Borgerkrigen

A 19th century refreshment recipe found on worldturn’udupsidedown
Civil War Era Pinappleade / Ananasade fra Tiden Rundt den Amerikanske Borgerkrigen

Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down’  writes: This recipe was cooked for the Historical Food Fortnightly. A yearly challenge that encourages bloggers to cook a historical food every two weeks.

Civil War Era Pinappleade recipe

For this challenge I decided to take on a lemonade twist with pineappleade. Pineapples were exotic fruits in the 1800s, mostly grown in Jamaica. They were used for such dishes as ice cream, pudding, pineapple chips, fritters, drinks and marmalade. They were considered a “dessert” fruit and was often paired with sugar. Pineapples, being imports, were not as common as home grown fruits. The first large quantity producing pineapple plantation in Florida was started in 1860 by Captain Benjamin Baker, who was probably accustomed to the enjoyment of them at sea.

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DIY Sunday – Modern Corner Desk in Plywood

DIY Sunday - Modern Corner Desk in Plywood

Plans for a space saving desk for small flats or cabins published
in the 1943 January issue of Popular Mechanics. And as usual
you can download the plans simply by clicking the icon below

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Beef Patties Creole / Kreolske Karbonader

A spicy pattie recipe found in “New Fashion Plates for
Your Menu” published by Planters Edible Oil Co in 1932

Beef Patties Creole / Kreolske Karbonader

Creole Cuisine is a style of cooking originating in Louisiana, United States which blends French, Spanish, Indian, Caribbean, Portuguese, Greek, Canarian, West African, Amerindian, German, Italian and Irish influences, as well as influences from the general cuisine of the Southern United States.

Creole cuisine revolves around influences found in Louisiana from populations present in Louisiana before the sale of Louisiana to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

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Pear Marmalade with Saffron and Chili / Pæremarmelade med Safran og Chili

An exiting way to preserve pears found on frukt.noPear Marmalade with Saffron and Chili / Pæremarmelade med Safran og Chili

A yummy and slightly different marmalade with pear, saffron and chili. The marmalade goes great with  fried meat and it makes a delicious sandwich spread.

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday–Bludwine / Budwine

19345510_1
Metal sign with the slogan “If you’re at all particular” stolen from Moxie.

Bludwine, later Budwine, was a brand of cherry-flavored soft drink and flavored syrups that was originally produced in the United States by the Bludwine Company and Bludwine Bottling Company. The Bludwine Company was founded by Henry C. Anderson in spring, 1906. Bludwine Kola Wars Atlanta Bludwine copyright Dennis Smith 2016Company produced the master elixir in Athens, Georgia, and various Bludwine Bottling Company locations processed the elixir into syrup and bottled soft drinks prepared from the syrup. The syrups were also shipped to and used at soda fountains as an ingredient to add flavor to various beverages. In 1911 Bludwine was marketed as having health benefits, such as aiding in digestion, and some physicians in Athens, Georgia and other areas of the state prescribed it to their patients. The brand’s name was changed from Bludwine to Budwine in 1921. Production of Budwine stopped in the mid 1990s.

Henry C. Anderson founded the Bludwine Company in Athens, Georgia in Spring, 1906 with $60 capital, and in 1910 the company was incorporated. Bludwine’s master elixir was manufactured solely in Athens (as of 1917), and then shipped to various Bludwine Company factory locations where it was used in the preparation of syrups. The syrup was also produced from the elixir at the company’s location in Athens. By 1917, the Bludwine Company operated in 26 U.S. states and had over 100 syrup bottling plants, and the Athens location was producing quantities of elixir that allowed for the production of 16,000 gallons of syrup daily. The company used a distillery to purify water used in producing the elixir.

bludwine

In the 1920s, Joseph Costa, an owner of an ice cream parlor in Athens, ran the company, and the Costa family owned the franchising rights for Budwine. Production of Budwine stopped in the mid 1990s.

Bludwine Bottling Company

jkr108Bludwine Bottling Company locations processed the master elixir produced and received from Athens, Georgia into syrup and bottled soft drinks prepared from the syrup. Bottling plant locations included New York City (New York Bludwine Co.), Dallas, Texas (Dallas Bludwine Company) and Jacksonville, Florida, among others, and the product was distributed throughout the United States.

In 1919, the Bludwine Bottling Company had Georgia-state locations in Athens, Augusta, Elberton, Gainesville, Macon and Rome.

A 1914 Bludwine advertisement stated that the bottles containing the product were in a hobble skirt shape and were sealed with a crown seal.

Composition

The soft drink product has been described as “cherry-flavored”. Bludwine’s primary ingredients included wheat and oats, lemon, orange, grape, ginger and peppermint. Refined sugar, created from imported raw sugar, was also used. as “a real invigorating, life-giving drink with a pungency and flavor that are unsurpassed”.

In 1912, the U.S. Bureau of Chemistry analyzed a sample of Bludwine syrup as part of U.S. v. Bludwine Co., and published results stating the syrup contained 0.142% citric acid, 0.066% phosphoric acid, 62.5% total solids, 0.11% alcohol, 0.11% ash, 1.2% sucrose, 63.7% total sugar as invert, 0.37% total acid as citric, flavor: capsicum and color: amaranth.

Name change

22979LFederal food regulators required elimination of the name Bludwine so in 1921, the company changed the name of the soft drink product from Bludwine to Budwine. At this time, the company announced that while the quality of the drink could not be further improved, the name was able to be improved.

Budwine was bottled over a wide area for many years but eventually declined until recent years when the only bottler was Athens, GA. The company closed around 1995.

Soufflé au Grand Marnier – Liqueur Soufflé / Likørsoufflé

A delicious dessert recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in in 1980
Soufflé au Grand Marnier – Liqueur Soufflé / Likørsoufflé

A soufflé (French: [su.fle]) is a baked egg-based dish originating from the early eighteenth century France. It is made with egg yolks and whipped egg white combined with various other ingredients and served as a tasty main course or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé comes from the French verb souffler which means ‘to breath’ or ‘to puff’.

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