About RecipeReminiscing

portait_recipeHello webwanderer, welcome to RecipeReminiscing. I’m TidiousTed and I run this blog. I’m not a chef or cook neither have I any formal training or education in catering or cooking. I’m just a graphic designer and web designer  who likes to cook. A lot of this blog is based on my large collection of old cook books in Norwegian, Swedish, Danish and English. The rest of the post comes from old ads and roaming the net looking for interesting recipes. I’m interested in food history and soda and soft drink history too so there will be posts on this from time to time as well. I hope you’ll enjoy your stay here – Ted

History of Mustard as a Condiment

An article by Peggy Trowbridge Filippone 
published on
The Spruce

History of Mustard as a CondimentAs a condiment, mustard is ancient. Prepared mustard dates back thousands of years to the early Romans, who used to grind mustard seeds and mix them with wine into a paste not much different from History of Mustard as a Condimentthe prepared mustards we know today. The spice was popular in Europe before the time of the Asian spice trade. It was popular long before pepper.

The Romans took the mustard seed to Gaul, where it was planted in vineyards along with the grapes. It soon became a popular condiment. French monasteries cultivated and sold mustard as early as the ninth century, and the condiment was for sale in Paris by the 13th century.

In the 1770s, mustard took a modern turn when Maurice Grey and Antoine Poupon introduced the world to Grey Poupon Dijon mustard.

History of Mustard as a CondimentTheir original store still can be seen in downtown Dijon. 

In 1866, Jeremiah Colman, founder of Colman’s Mustard of England, was appointed as mustard-maker to Queen Victoria. Colman perfected the technique of grinding mustard seeds into a fine powder without creating the heat which brings out the oil.

The oil must not be exposed or the flavor evaporates with the oil.

Mustard Species

There are about 40 species of mustard plants. The three species that are used to make mustard are the black, brown and white mustards. White mustard, which originated in the Mediterranean, is the antecedent of the bright yellow hot dog mustard we are all familiar with. Brown mustard from the Himalayas is familiar as Chinese restaurant mustard, and it serves as the base for most European and American mustards. Black mustard originated in the Middle East and in Asia Minor, where it is still popular. Edible mustard greens are a different species of mustard. The history of cultivation of mustard centers on the seeds, not the greens, which have been credited with originating both in China and Japan.

History of Mustard as a Condiment

Mustard’s Medicinal History

Long ago, mustard was considered a medicinal plant rather than a culinary one. In the sixth century B.C., Greek scientist Pythagoras used mustard as a remedy for scorpion stings. A hundred years later, Hippocrates used mustard in medicines and poultices. Mustard plasters were applied to treat toothaches and a number of other ailments.

Mustard’s Religious History

History of Mustard as a CondimentThe mustard seed is a prominent reference for those of the Christian faith, exemplifying something that is small and insignificant, which when planted, grows in strength and power.

Pope John XII was so fond of mustard that he created a new Vatican position—grand moutardier du pape (mustard-maker to the pope—and promptly filled the post with his nephew. His nephew was from the Dijon region, which soon became the mustard center of the world.

Mustard in Modern Culture

History of Mustard as a CondimentWe all know that losers and quitters can’t cut the mustard (live up to the challenge), and perhaps the reason ballpark mustard is so popular is because pitchers apply mustard to their fastballs to get those strikeouts. The disabling and even lethal chemical weapon known as mustard gas is a synthetic copy based on the volatile nature of mustard oils.

Coconut Butterscotch Pie / Kokos- og Smørkaramellpai

A pie recipe from “Cocnut – Sun-Sweetness From The Tropics”
published by Franklin Baker Company in 1928

Coconut Butterscotch Pie / Kokos- og Smørkaramellpai

Butterscotch is a type of confectionery whose primary ingredients are brown sugar and butter, although other ingredients are part of some recipes, such as corn syrup, cream, vanilla, and salt. The earliest known recipes in the middle 19th century used treacle (molasses) in place of or in addition to sugar.

Butterscotch is similar to toffee, but for butterscotch the sugar is boiled to the soft crack stage, and not hard crack as with toffee. Butterscotch sauce, made of butterscotch and cream, is used as a topping for ice cream (particularly sundaes).

The term butterscotch is also often used more specifically of the flavour of brown sugar and butter together, even where the actual confection butterscotch is not involved, such as in butterscotch pudding.

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Chocolate Masquerade Pudding / Sjokolade Maskeradepudding

A dessert recipe found in “Baker’s Favourite Chocolate Recipes”
published in 1936

Chocolate Masquerade Pudding / Sjokolade Maskeradepudding

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Strawberry Charlotte / Jordbær Charlotte

A dessert recipe found on “150 New Ways to Serve Ice Cream”  published by Sealtest System Laboratories Inc in 1936
Strawberry Charlotte / Jordbær Charlotte

A charlotte is a type of dessert or trifle that can be served hot or cold. It can also be known as an “ice-box cake”. Bread, sponge cake or biscuits/cookies or in this case sliced bananas are used to line a mold, which is then filled with a fruit puree, custardor ice cream. It can also be made using layers of bread or cake crumbs.

Classically, stale bread dipped in butter was used as the lining, but sponge cake or ladyfingers may be used today. The filling may be covered with a thin layer of similarly flavoured gelatin.

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German PotatoSoup / Tysk Potetsuppe

A traditional German soup recipe found in“Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970
German PotatoSoup / Tysk Potetsuppe

The Germany cuisine has evolved as a national cuisine through centuries of social and political change with variations from region to region. Some regions of Germany, like Bavaria and neighbouring Swabia, share dishes with Austrian and parts of Swiss cuisine.

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Mussels in Apple Juice and Coconut Milk / Blåskjell i Eplejuice og Kokosmelk

A delicious and different mussel recipe found on kiwi.no
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Mussel is the common name used for members of several families of bivalve molluscs, from saltwater and freshwater habitats. These groups have in common a shell whose outline is elongated and asymmetrical compared with other edible clams, which are often more or less rounded or oval.

The word “mussel” is most frequently used to mean the edible bivalves of the marine family Mytilidae, most of which live on exposed shores in the intertidal zone, attached by means of their strong byssal threads (“beard”) to a firm substrate. A few species (in the genus Bathymodiolus) have colonised hydrothermal vents associated with deep ocean ridges.

In most marine mussels the shell is longer than it is wide, being wedge-shaped or asymmetrical. The external colour of the shell is often dark blue, blackish, or brown, while the interior is silvery and somewhat nacreous.

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Taco Meatballs with Mashed Veggies / Tacokjøttboller med grønnsaksmos

Recipe for a spicy everyday dinner found on aperitif.no
 Taco Meatballs with Mashed Veggies / Tacokjøttboller med grønnsaksmos

Even though it’s a workday, it does not mean you have to eat boring food for that reason. With a simple twist, you can make a traditional dish new and exciting, like with this recipe.

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DIY Sunday – All Wood Stroller

DIY Sunday - All Wood Stroller

This nifty kid stroller was published in the 1944 August eddition
of Popular Mechanics and you can download them in pdf format
by clicking the icon below

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Savory Eggs / Velsmakende Egg

A breakfast recipe found in “Recipes the Modern Pabst-ett Way”
published by the Pabst Cooporation in 1931

Savory Eggs / Velsmakende Egg

Pabst-ett was a cheese prodused by Pabst brewery during Prohibition. After Prohibition ended in 1933, Pabst sold the cheese business off to Kraft who continued to produce Pabst-ett cheese until at least the late 1940’s. If you want to try your hand at this recipe, use any cheese to your taste you think might go well the rest of the recipe ingredients.

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Sweet Potato with Avocado Cream and Crispy Bacon / Søtpotet med Avokadokrem og Sprøstekt Bacon

A snack/starter recipe found on gilde.no
Sweet Potato with Avocado Cream and Crispy Bacon / Søtpotet med Avokadokrem og Sprøstekt Bacon

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Swedish Fryingpan Bread / Pannbröd

A fryingpan or griddle bread recipe found on koket.se
Swedish Fryingpan Bread / Pannbröd

Fryingpan bread, or “stompa” as it is also called,
usually Swedish children’s favourite between meals snack.

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Royal Tru

DSC03892royal-tru-orangeRoyal Tru is a carbonated fruit drink brand owned by The Coca-Cola Company that is only available in the Philippines. It also uses the same styling as its Coca-Cola global cousin Fanta. It was introduced in 1922 by the San Miguel Brewery as their first non-alcoholic, carbonated beverage and it was primarily referred to as Royal Tru-Orange due to its original flavour, while other variants like Royal Tru-Dalandan, Royal Tru-Grape, and Royal Tru-Orange Light were introduced in 2003, and Royal Tru-Lemon was introduced in the last quarter of 2012.

History

royal-tru-orange-in-plastic-bottleRoyal Tru-Orange was first introduced in the 1922 by the San Miguel Brewery as their first non-alcoholic, carbonated beverage. However, it became popular since the beverage targeted teenagers as its consumers. It was available in single-serve bottles and contained orange pulp bits. Royal Tru-Orange was also one of the pioneering teams of Philippine Basketball Association in 1975. It is the only remaining pioneering franchise in the league, although it is carrying the San Miguel Beer brand as of 2008.

Royal-Tru-Orange-ad1976Royal Tru-Orange gained much attention in the late 1980s, after its logo and formulation (without the orange pulp bits) were changed, through an advertising campaign that starred teen model RJ Ledesma playing the role of Joey. The first television advertisement in the series, wherein Joey was being egged on by friends to introduce himself to a girl named Jenny, was directed by noted film director Lino Brocka.

Apple Toddy / Epletoddy

A recipe for a lovely spicy toddy found on meny.no
Apple Toddy / Epletoddy

Autumn is just around the corner here Norway now, so the evenings are not that hot anymore so this simple recipe for a tasty apple toddy can be a good idea. If you love apple and ginger, this hot drink is just the thing for you.

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Salmon Burgers on Potato Patties / Grove Laksekarbonader på Potetlapper

A delicious salmon recipe found on rema.no
Salmon Burgers on Potato Patties / Grove Laksekarbonader på Potetlapper

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Potato Waffles with Smoked Salmon / Kartoffelvafler med Røget Laks

A fun way to serve potatoes found on soendag.dk 
Potato Waffles with Smoked Salmon / Kartoffelvafler med Røget Laks

A fun and delicious way to serve potatoes!

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