About RecipeReminiscing

portait_recipeHello webwanderer, welcome to RecipeReminiscing. I’m TidiousTed and I run this blog. I’m not a chef or cook neither have I any formal training or education in catering or cooking. I’m just a graphic designer and web designer  who likes to cook. A lot of this blog is based on my large colllection of old cook books in Norwegian, Swedish, Danish and English. The rest of the post comes from old ads and roaming the net looking for interesting recipes. I’m interested in food history and soda and soft drink history too so there will be posts on this from time to time as well. I hope you’ll enjoy your stay here – Ted

Old-Fashioned Gingersnaps / Gammeldagse Ingefærkjeks

An old spicy cookie recipe found on bhg.com
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Gingersnaps, also called ginger biscuits, are a type of cookie. The name comes from the fact these cookies traditionally are very crispy and make a snapping sound when eaten. Gingersnaps are a derivation of gingerbread and were invented hundreds of years ago. People in colonial times enjoyed these cookies, both in European countries and in America.

Origins

Ginger is derived from the ginger root and is native to parts of South Asia; historians believe it was first cultivated in India. Ginger was prized for its valuable effects on health and imported for its medicinal uses before it was utilized for cooking purposes. Ginger found its way to ancient Rome, then to Africa and the Caribbean. In medieval times, ginger was imported to Europe in preserved form to be used in baking treats such as cakes and cookies.

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Picnic Pizzalinis / Piknikk Pizzalinis

An Italian inspired picnic recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s
Kitchen Cook Book” published in 1980
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These light but filling individual pizzas make a good Sunday brunch or T.V. supper meal as well as picnic fare. They are a pleasant change from sandwiches for packed office lunch-boxes too.

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Who Invented Sliced Bread?

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bread_01Bread is one of the world’s oldest prepared foods. There’s evidence humans were whipping up a crude form of the stuff some 30,000 years ago. Sliced bread, however, has been around for less than a century. The first automatically sliced commercial loaves were produced on July 6, 1928, in Chillicothe, Missouri, using a machine invented by Otto Rohwedder, an Iowa-born, Missouri-based jeweler. Rohwedder’s quest to make sliced bread a reality was not without its challenges. A 1917 fire destroyed his prototype and blueprints, and he also faced skepticism from bakers, who thought factory-sliced loaves would quickly go stale or fall apart. Nevertheless, in 1928, Rohwedder’s rebuilt “power-driven, multi-bladed” bread slicer was put into service at his friend Frank Bench’s Chillicothe Baking Company.

bread_02Rohwedder’s newfangled contraption was greeted with an enthusiastic report in the July 6, 1928, edition of the Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune, which noted that while some people might find sliced bread “startling,” the typical housewife could expect “a thrill of pleasure when she first sees a loaf of this bread with each slice the exact counterpart of its fellows. So neat and precise are the slices, and so definitely better than anyone could possibly slice by hand with a bread knife that one realizes instantly that here is a refinement that will receive a hearty and permanent welcome.” The article also recounted that “considerable research” had gone into determining the right thickness for each slice: slightly less than half an inch.

bread_04Sliced bread didn’t take long to become a hit around the United States, even as some bakers contended it was just a fad, and by 1930 it could be found in most towns across the country. By that point, the majority of Americans were eating commercially made bread, compared with just decades earlier, when most of the supply still was homemade. The factory-produced loaves were designed to be softer than those prepared at home or at small, local bakeries because the bread-buying public had come to equate “squeezable softness” with freshness, according to “White Bread” by Aaron Bobrow-Strain. The timing therefore was right for an automatic slicing machine because, as Bobrow-Strain says, these softer, “modern loaves had become almost impossible to slice neatly at home.”

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One of the first major brands to distribute sliced bread was Wonder, starting in 1930. Wonder Bread originally appeared in stores in 1921 in bread_06Indianapolis, where it was manufactured by the Taggart Baking Company. An executive there dreamed up the bread’s name after being filled with wonder while watching the International Balloon Race at the Indianapolis Speedway. After the Continental Baking Company bought Taggart in 1925, Wonder was sold nationally; the bread’s popularity soared once it was marketed in sliced form. During World War II, factory-sliced bread, including Wonder, was briefly banned by the U.S. government in an effort to conserve resources, such as the paper used to wrap each loaf to help maintain freshness. In 2012, Wonder Bread disappeared completely from store shelves after its then-owner, Hostess Brands (which also made Twinkies and Ding Dongs, among other famous snacks), declared bankruptcy. Thankfully for fans of the iconic bread, another company stepped in and re-launched the Wonder brand in 2013.

Article by Elizabeth Nix found on history.com

In context

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Article from Modern Mechanix Nov, 1929

Cold Hen with Herb Dressing / Kald Høne med Urtedressing

A great cold summer dish found in “Alt om Urter”
(all About Herbs) published by Den Norske Bokklubb in 1985
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A delightful dish for people with a herb garden, a henhouse and hippie tendencies. I’ve had my share of dishes like this back in the late seventies early eighties when the smallholding dream hit my generation in full force. It did not last, they soon missed the latte and the sushi and headed back for the bright lights and the big city and became yuppies instead. Typical of the Scandinavian baby boom generation born in the fifties and early sixties, always searching for something else – Ted 😉

Note: My rambling comments are no critic of the dish itself, it is absolutely delicious. Besides, who am I to talk, I’m part of that baby boom generation myself 😀

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Chicken Salad Queen Victoria / Hønsesalat Queen Victoria

 A classic salad recipe found on the Snack & Salads section
on the Danish “International Food Encyclopaedia MENU”
published by Lademann

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I don’t know if old Victoria liked this salad particularly, but the Danish Lademann’s “International Food Encyclopaedia MENU” has chosen to call it that anyway. I have my doubts really, as I’ve read on several occasions that she preferred her dishes a lot more filling than this – Ted 😉

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Hershey’s Chocolate Cream Pie / Hersheys Sjokoladekrempai

A great recipe and a great story found on lostpastrememberedHershey's Chocolate Cream Pie_post

deana sidneyDeana Sidnet (picture) who runs lostpastremembered writes: This pie probably had its roots in the depression and was served at the Hershey Hotel in Hershey PA., the town and the Hotel that chocolate built … or at least that the founder of Hershey built. Milton Hershey was a community spirited man who built quality affordable housing for his workers who loved him. This is my idea of a great industrialist and a lovely man.

Milton Hershey 1857-1945He and his wife had wanted to build a hotel for many years but his initial plan to duplicate the Heliopolis Hotel in Cairo was prohibitively expensive at $5 million (and rather mad for a tiny company town like Hershey PA) The death of his beloved wife Kitty in 1915 put a stop to the plan.

However, when he saw so many out of work in the Depression (even though he kept his factories going and his workers paid) he decided to build a less ambitious hotel (based on one he had Hershey's Chocolate Cream Pie Bseen with his wife on the Mediterranean) for his community in 1932, putting 600 men to work and taking advantage of depression prices on materials. The 2 million dollar hotel opened in 1933. The Hotel still thrives, Hershey PA is still the “Sweetest Place on Earth” (where else can you meet at the corner of Chocolate Avenue and Cocoa Avenue beneath Hershey’s kiss shaped streetlights?) and the Hershey Hotel still serves Chocolate Cream Pie!

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Retro Raspberry Lime Rickeys / Retro Bringebær og Lime Rickeys

A retro drink enjoying renewed interest found on food52.com
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The Rickey is a highball drink made from gin or bourbon, half of a lime squeezed and dropped in the glass, and carbonated water. Little or no sugar is added to the rickey. Originally created with bourbon in Washington, D.C. at Shoomaker’s bar by bartender George A. Williamson in the 1880s, purportedly in collaboration with Democratic lobbyist Colonel Joe Rickey, it became a worldwide sensation when mixed with gin a decade later.

A recipe for the rickey appears as early as Daly’s Bartenders’ Encyclopedia (1903, p. 57) by Tim Daly:

GIN RICKEY. Use a sour glass. Squeeze the juice of one lime into it. 1 small lump of ice. 1 wine glass of Plymouth gin. Fill the glass with syphon seltzer, and serve with small bar spoon.

This rickey on the other hand is alcohol free:

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Sixteenth Century Orange Chicken / Appelsinkylling fra det Sekstende Århundre

A Elizabethan recipe found on allrecipes.comMedieval Monday_headingSixteenth Century Orange Chicken_post

This recipe was adapted from “A housewife’s Kitchen Guide” published in 1594! The sauce is slightly sweet, but very good.

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1917 – Ryzon Corn Bread / Ryzon Maisbrød

A old fashioned recipe found in “Ryzon Baking Book”
by Marion Harris Neil published in 1917
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It is nice to see that the recipes from these early 19th century ads, recipe booklets and books still are popular. I posted another one from a Kellogg’s ad the other day and it was one of the most popular posts that week – Ted🙂

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Bacon Chicken / Baconkylling

A chicken recipe found in “Fjærkre” (Poultry) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

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In my eyes. bacon and chicken is as close to a match made
in heaven as you can get – Ted😉

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Alexandre Dumas’ Dictionary of Cuisine

dumas_02When I was a kid I was a great fan of Alexandre Dumas and when I was twelve my parents bought me a 24 volume edition of “The Three Musketeers” for Christmas. I did nothing but read for a fortnight. I had hardly time for school or  homework and when I had read all 24 books I went to the library and borrowed the rest of his books I hadn’t already read.

Five years later I read them all again in English and I still got all the Norwegian and the English versions on my book shelves.

My love of food and cooking was even then as great as my love of reading and I knew Dumas had written a cook book, but it was not in print back then. I never forgot his novels but his cook book had slipped my mind until I read about it on a blog recently.

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A cook book by Dumas may seen an improbability. Yet Alexandre Dumas was an expert cook – his love of food was said to be equalled only by his love of women – and his “Great Dictionary of Cuisine,” written “to be read by worldly people and used by professionals” and published posthumously in 1873, is a masterpiece in its own right.

This abridged version of the “Dictionary” is designed to be both useful and entertaining. There are hundreds of recipes for sauces, soups, meat, fish, eggs, poultry and game well within the scope of an experienced and imaginative cook.

For his “dinner” entry he wrote:

Dinner. A major daily activity, which can be accomplished in worthy fashion only by intelligent people. It is not enough to eat. To dine, there must be diversified, calm conversation. It should sparkle with rubies of the wine between courses, be deliciously suave with the sweetness of dessert, and acquire true profundity with the coffee.

Where ever you are Alexandre, I hope there are delicious food,
great wine and beautiful women in abundance there – Ted 😉

You can buy an abridged version of the book at amazon.com here

Victorian Jam Roly-Poly / Viktoriansk Rullekake med Syltetøy

A classic British dessert recipe found on bbc.co.uk/food/
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This modern version of the retro classic is cooked in the oven
instead of steamed.

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Lemon Madeira Cake / Sitron & Madeira Kake

A nice cake recipe found on goodtoknow.co.uk
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This lemon Madeira cake recipe is so simple with just a few ingredients. Serve with a cuppa – and relax. Madeira cake is the perfect afternoon mood-lifter. This classic Madeira cake will take around 1hr and 15 mins to prepare and bake. It’s a real family favourite that you’ll want to make time and time again. This recipe serves 6-8 people. Leftovers can be stored in an airtight container or cake tin and are best eaten within 3 days of baking. This cake is just perfect served with a cuppa as an afternoon treat or if you want to serve with for dessert we’d recommend serving it warm with ice cream or with homemade custard.

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Kickapoo Joy Juice

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Kickapoo Joy Juice is a citrus-flavoured soft drink brand owned by The Monarch Beverage Company. The name was originally introduced in Li’l Abner, a comic strip that ran from 1934 through 1977. Although L’il Abner‘s Kickapoo Joy Juice was an alcoholic drink, the real world beverage is a lightly carbonated soda pop.

Li’l Abner

kickapoo_03The name, “Kickapoo Joy Juice”, was originally coined as a “volatile brew” in Li’l Abner, an American comic strip. Al Capp, the cartoonist, described the drink as “a liquor of such stupefying potency that the hardiest citizens of Dogpatch, after the first burning sip, rose into the air, stiff as frozen codfish”. The concoction was brewed by Lonesome Polecat and Hairless Joe, two of the comic strip’s backwood poachers. Capp asserted in 1965 that the cartoon “never has suggested that the drink is moonshine”, in response to claims that the Kickapoo Joy Juice of L’il Abner was an illicitly distilled liquor.

Product

kickapoo_02The real world drink was introduced in 1965 under NuGrape, a former brand of The Monarch Beverage Company. That year, Nugrape worked out a deal with Al Capp, the owner of the “Kickapoo Joy Juice” rights, to produce the beverage as a carbonated soft drink. Capp, however, would have the last word on all advertising and promotion. Kickapoo Joy Juice’s early advertising campaign was very similar to Mountain Dew’s of the time – using characters from L’il Abner to create and market a hillbilly feeling. Although the product is currently distributed largely in Asian markets (Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei and Bangladesh), the can still comes decorated with a vintage L’il Abner drawing.

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Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jane Austen’s Flummery

A dessert recipe inspired by Jane Austen’s novels
found in historyextra.com
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Whether it’s breakfast at Northanger Abbey, tea and cake at Mansfield Park, or one of Mrs Bennet’s dinners to impress, food is an important theme in Jane Austen’s novels. And now, Austen fans can recreate the dishes featured in the author’s works, thanks to new book “Dinner with Mr Darcy” by Pen Vogler

Flummery is a white jelly, which was set in elegant molds or as shapes in clear jelly. Its delicate, creamy taste goes particularly well with rhubarb, strawberries, and raspberries. A modern version would be to add the puréed fruit to the ingredients, taking away the same volume of water.

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