About RecipeReminiscing

portait_recipeHello webwanderer, welcome to RecipeReminiscing. I’m TidiousTed and I run this blog. I’m not a chef or cook neither have I any formal training or education in catering or cooking. I’m just a graphic designer and web designer  who likes to cook. A lot of this blog is based on my large collection of old cook books in Norwegian, Swedish, Danish and English. The rest of the post comes from old ads and roaming the net looking for interesting recipes. I’m interested in food history and soda and soft drink history too so there will be posts on this from time to time as well. I hope you’ll enjoy your stay here – Ted

Shanghai Style Sweet and Sour Pork / Sursøtt Svinekjøtt Shanghai Style

A little different take on Sweet and Sour Pork
found on what was then called
about.com
Shanghai Style Sweet and Sour Pork / Sursøtt Svinekjøtt Shanghai Style

It’s very likely at some point in your life you’ve eaten something sweet and sour. If you’ve eaten sweet and sour you’ve almost certainly eaten Cantonese style sweet and sour and it had either pork or chicken. But have you ever tried “Shanghai Style Sweet and Sour Pork”?

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Braided Egg Bread / Flettebrød med Egg

A recipe for great looking egg bread found on crisco.com
Braided Egg Bread / Flettebrød med Egg

You don’t often see braided bread like this in Scandinavia, cakes on the other hand is far from rare. These braids  are usually glazed with a simple confectioners’ sugar glazing.

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Cryspez – Medieval Pancakes / Pannekaker som i Middelalderen

A Medieval dessert/snacks recipe found on CookIt!
Cryspez -  Medieval Pancakes / Pannekaker som i Middelalderen

Pancakes were (and still are) served on Shrove Tuesday (Pancake Day), which marks the last day before Lent. Christians began fasting on Ash Wednesday and certain foods were forbidden throughout Lent. Eggs and milk were used up before Lent began, which is why we make pancakes on Shrove Tuesday.

The finished pancakes are a little like small, crispy doughnuts, with a wonderfully frilly shape. The batter puffs up in the hot oil. You need to work quickly to keep them crisp and serve them as soon as the last ones are cooked. They are quite rich and so are particularly nice dipped in a slightly sharp fruit sauce.

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Gosht Takhari – Indian Beef Curry / Indisk Karrirett med Oksekjøtt

A classic North Indian curry found in “The love of Cooking”
by Sonia Allison published in 1972

Gosht Takhari – Indian Beef Curry / Indisk Karrirett med Oksekjøtt

Chicken karahi, also known as gosht takhahi (when prepared with beef instead of chicken) is a Pakistani and North Indian dish noted for its spicy taste. The Pakistani version does not have capsicum or onions whereas the North Indian version often uses capsicum. The dish is prepared in a karahi (wok). It can take between 30 to 50 minutes to prepare and cook the dish and can be stored for later consumption. It can be served with naan, roti or rice. This dish is one the hallmarks of what Indian or Pakistani cuisine is.

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Scrambled Eggs with Smoked Salmon, Spinach and Pine Nuts / Eggerøre med Røkt Laks, Spinat og Pinjekjerner

A classic Norwegian summer dish found on prior.no
Scrambled Eggs with Smoked Salmon, Spinach and Pine Nuts / Eggerøre med Røkt Laks, Spinat og Pinjekjerner

Salmon and scrambled eggs are classic Norwegian summer food. I have had variations of this dish at more Norwegian outdoor restaurants than I can remember and usually the food has been as expected; Tasteful and delicious.

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Grilled Scallops and Crayfish with Hot Salad / Grillet Kamskjell og Sjøkreps med Varm Salat

A seafood appetizer recipe found on godfisk.no
Grilled Scallops and Crayfish with Hot Salad / Grillet Kamskjell og Sjøkreps med Varm Salat

Scallops and crayfish tails only take a moment on the grill before they are ready to serve. In this recipe, the season’s delicious vegetables are accessories, so celebrate summer!

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DIY Sunday – Kick-Katamaran

DIY Sunday - Kick-Katamaran

It may not look like neither the safest nor the most comfortable
of vessels, but I’m sure it will be great fun once you get it on
the water. The plans were published in the 1944 July edition
of Popular Mechanics and as usual you can download
them in pdf format by clicking the icon below

pdf symbol

Traditional Swedish Cabbage Soup / Tradisjonell Skånsk Kålsuppe

A traditional recipe from Sweden’s southernmost landscape found in “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance) published by Cappelen in 1991

Traditional Swedish Cabbage Soup / Tradisjonell Skånsk Kålsuppe

Nordic cookbook history was written in 1974. That year a bunch of Swedish foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, Carl Butler’s Cookbook. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato sauce and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of herbal spices and garlic it can be found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and paté on our tables.

For all Scandinavians who like me love that cook book it took 17 years before we could hurry to the book shops to buy the continuance. It was simply called “Carl Butler’s Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance). This recipe is from that book – Ted

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Cheesecake with Ginger and Nutmeg / Ostekake med Ingefær og Muskat

A spicy cheese cake recipe found in “Ost i Varme og Kalde Retter” (Cheese in Hot nd Cold Dishes) published by
Den Norske Bokklubben i 1988
Cheesecake with Ginger and Nutmeg / Ostekake med Ingefær og Muskat

Cheesecake is a cake-like pie, which usually contains the kesam (or another unsalted cream cheese), egg, milk and sugar.

Already in Roman antiquity, a type of cheesecake was made of sour cream and kesame. Recipes have been retrieved from Cato the Elder’s collection, where he refers to two types: libum and placenta. Of the two, the placenta resembles most modern cheesecakess, since it has a crust that is baked separately.

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Steak Sandwich with Mango Sauce / Biffsandwich med Mangosaus

A Juicy steak sandwich recipe found in “Minikokeboken – Storfekjøtt Klassisk og Moderne” (The Mini Cook Book –
Beef Classic and Modern) published by
the Norwegian Information Office for Meat

Steak Sandwich with Mango Sauce / Biffsandwich med Mangosaus

Chiabatta eller Ciabatta (Italian pronunciation: [tʃaˈbatta], literally slipper bread) is an Italian white bread made from wheat flour, water, salt, and yeast, created in 1982 by a baker in Verona, Veneto, Italy, in response to the popularity of French baguettes. Ciabatta is somewhat elongated, broad, and flat, and is baked in many variations.

While panino indicates any kind of sandwich regardless of the bread used (whether slices or a bun), a toasted sandwich made from small loaves of ciabatta is known as panini (plural of panino) outside Italy.

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Virgin Cola

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Virgin ColaVirgin Cola is a carbonated cola soft drink produced by Silver Spring and part of the Virgin Group. It was launched in 1994.

History

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Virgin ColaVirgin Cola was set up during the early 1990s in conjunction with Cott, a Canadian company that specialises in bottling own-label drinks. Cott was looking for a major international brand that could have global appeal. Virgin founder, Richard Branson was looking to widen the Virgin name and to rival Coca-Cola and Pepsi brands.

Virgin Cola began to hit international shores within its first year. The UK first served the drink on Virgin Atlantic flights, on-board shops on Virgin Trains and also at Virgin Cinemas. The Gulliver’s Kingdom chain of theme parks in the UK also sold post mix Virgin cola. This led Virgin Cola to agree a distribution deal with British supermarket retailer Tesco in 1994.

From 1996, the 500 ml bottles were marketed as “The Pammy”, as their curves were designed to resemble Pamela Anderson who was at the height of her popularity in the UK at the time. It went on to be launched in France, Belgium and South Africa.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Virgin Cola

In 1998, Branson himself attended the USA launch of Virgin Cola, driving a tank into New York City’s Times Square as part of the launch. It subsequently agreed distribution channels with US retailers such as Target. Virgin Drinks USA, the company dealing in Virgin Cola’s US market closed in April 2001, having managed to establish just a 0.5% share of the market by volume.

In 1999 a bottle of Virgin Cola can be seen on the coffee table in Monica and Rachel’s apartment during the February 4th US airing of the Friends episode entitled “The one with Joey’s bag”. Richard Branson had previously appeared in an episode and was said to be a fan of the show.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Virgin Cola

In 2002, a vanilla cola called Virgin Vanilla was launched in the UK, ahead of the launch of a similar product from rival Coca-Cola. In 2004, it was announced that Virgin Vanilla would be discontinued in order to focus on the teenage market.

In 2007, Silver Spring acquired the UK licence from Princes limited. However, in 2012 the company fell into administration and ceased production. No company acquired the UK Virgin Cola licence in its place.

Countries in which Virgin Cola is sold

Today, despite the collapse of Virgin Cola in the United Kingdom, Virgin Cola is still sold in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, France, Italy, Japan, Kosovo, Malta, Nigeria, China, Switzerland, Tunisia, and Philippines. Virgin Drinks has since fallen, but bottling companies in these countries have acquired the licence.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Virgin Cola

Almond Squares / Mandelruter

A cake square recipe found in “Den Store Bakeboken”
(The Big Baking Book) published by Schibstedt in 1978

Almond Squares / Mandelruter

Tasty neat little goodies for the afternoon tea or the after dinner coffee.

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Traditional Norwegian Castle Roast / Slottsstek

A recipe for a classic Norwegian Sunday dinner found in
“Cappelens Kokebok” (Cappelen’s cook Book) published in 1995

Traditional Norwegian Castle Roast / Slottsstek

Castle Roast is also called Manor House Roast – a nice old Norwegian recipe. The roast is served hot with sauce, boiled potatoes, vegetables
and cranberry jam or rowanberry jelly. A tasty spicy roast
when you want to do some extra out of a Sunday dinner.

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Chocolatetown Pie / Chocolatetown Pai

A pie recipe found in “Hershey’s Make It Chocolate”
published in 1987

Chocolatetown Pie / Chocolatetown Pai

Go explore the many wonders of chocolate  at the first Hershey Chocolate World. Attraction located in Chocolatetown, USA – Hershey, Pennsylvania!

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The History of Canned Milk

An article by Peggy Trowbridge Filippone posted on The SpruceThe History of Canned Milk

Depending on your age and perhaps gender, you may have never partaken of evaporated or condensed milk, at least not knowingly. Chances are your grandmother or great-grandmother made at least one The History of Canned Milkheirloom comfort food using one or the other. In the early part of the 1900s, both were used more than fresh milk because they were more shelf-stable and posed less of a health risk than fresh milk. Of course, this was before the government had laws in effect to insure the safety of fresh milk, not to mention refrigerators as standard equipment in every kitchen.

Those in the armed forces are familiar with both of these milk staples. Today, low-fat, skim and non-fat versions are available with recipe applications not limited to sweets and desserts. Learn more about evaporated and condensed milk before trying the canned milk recipes.

Canned milk history

Prior to the nineteenth century, drinking milk was an iffy situation with regard to health risks. Milk straight from the cow was loaded with bacteria. Milk not consumed within a matter of hours in summer soon spoiled in the heat. Illness allegedly derived from contaminated milk consumption was referred to as “the milksick,” “milk poison,” “the slows,” “the trembles,” and “the milk evil.” Granted some of these illnesses (considering modern-day knowledge of lactose intolerance) The History of Canned Milkwere probably not due to the milk or milk alone, but the stigma persisted. The idea for a portable canned milk product that would not spoil came to Gail Borden during a transatlantic trip on board a ship in 1852.

The cows in the hold became too seasick to be milked during the long trip, and an immigrant infant died from lack of milk. Borden realized his goal in 1854. His first condensed milk product lasted three days without souring. He first thought the condensing process of the milk made it more stable but later on realized it was the heating process that killed the bacteria and microorganisms that cause spoilage.

Borden was granted a patent for sweetened condensed milk in 1856. The sugar was added to inhibit bacterial growth. Skim milk devoid of all fat was used. Use of this early version lacking in nutrients as a mainstay for young working-class children has been blamed for contributing to a rash of rickets cases in 1905. The Borden Company issued this press release in 1924, extolling the virtues of its product “in relief work among war refugees and in the treatment of public school children of New York”.

Early canned milk was spurned

The History of Canned MilkBorden’s new condensed milk product was not well-received in its early days. In those days, customers were used to watered-down milk, with chalk added to make it white and molasses added for creaminess. Borden had begun commercial production in 1857 in Burrville, Connecticut. When the dubious practice of feeding New York cows on distillery mash by competing fresh milk suppliers was exposed by The History of Canned MilkLeslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, Borden’s condensed milk business greatly benefited. In 1861, the Union Army purchased Borden’s condensed milk for use in field rations, further bolstering its success.
It was John Baptist Meyenberg who first suggested canned evaporated milk to his employers at the Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Co.

in Switzerland in 1866. Since the company was already so successful producing sweetened condensed milk, the idea was rejected. Meyenberg emigrated to the United States and began his own company, Helvetia Milk Condensing Co. (Pet Milk), eventually marketing unsweetened condensed milk in 1890.

The History of Canned MilkAlthough Borden received his patent in 1854, unsweetened condensed milk was not successfully canned until 1885 by competitor John Meyenberg. Borden added evaporated milk to the product line in 1892. In 1899, Elbridge Amos Stuart came up with a new process for canned, sterilized, evaporated milk. With help from evaporated milk pioneer Meyenberg, Stuart began successful mass production of canned evaporated milk. Evaporated milk manufacturers pioneered the use of homogenization (redistribution of fat globules so they are imperceptibly distributed), but dairies producing fresh milk were slow to follow the homogenization trail.

With all the talk these days of irradiating foods to eliminate microorganisms that cause foodborne illness, you may think it a relatively new procedure. Not at all. In 1934, Pet Milk Co. introduced the first evaporated milk products to be fortified with vitamin D via irradiation processing. Nowadays, less than two percent of the United States milk production is evaporated or condensed.