The Perfect Orange Cake

Recipe from an ad for Royal Baking Powder from the thirties
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From the ad: Can’t you just taste the first bite of it right now – the orange-y sweet frosting, the light tender layers, the fluffy creamy filling, delicately flavoured with orange? A very delicious cake and very easy to make. But a fruit other than oranges and lemons is responsible for much of the lusciousness of this cake! Ripe grapes have furnished the cream of tartar for Royal Baking Powder. And Royal alone insures these light layers, fine of texture, tasty and wholesome.

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Chinese Wonton Soup

From“Soup Beautiful Soup” by Ursel Norman with
illustrations by Derek Norman Published by
William Morrow & Company in New York in 1978
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A very delicate soup, cool and refined. Ideal for a hot summer’s day, this soup makes a superb start to a meal. Surprise and delight your friends with this extraordinary, subtIe taste. Escoffier once said "Of all the items on the menu, soup is that which exacts the most delicate perfection and the strictest attention." This soup will stand the closest scrutiny and leave a lasting impression.

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Apricot Cakes

Recipe (translated from Norwegian) from “Rumford Bakebok” published in 1927
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In Context:
At a jumble-sale this summer I picked up a stack of small cookbooks and among them was the one you can see in the illustration above, “Rumford Bakebok” from 1927. I suspect that it is translated from English as Rumford is not a Norwegian product but who cares. With a bit of fancy PhotoShoping I managed to place both the book and a tin of Rumford into the intro illustrations for the recipes from the little book.

The book had been appreciated as it was obvious that several generations of the woman in the Grindalen family had used it frequently (two generations had scribbled their name inside and one on the outside) before it ended up in my vast collection of old printed matter.

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Annie Oakley Barbecue

Recipes from a Canada Dry ginger ale ad from 1954
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In context:
Annie Oakley (August 13, 1860 – November 3, 1926), born Phoebe Ann Moses, was an American sharpshooter and exhibition shooter. Oakley’s "amazing talent" and timely rise to fame led to a starring role in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show, which propelled her to become the first American female superstar.

Perhaps Oakley’s most famous trick was her ability to repeatedly split a playing card, edge-on, and put several more holes in it before it could touch the ground, while using a .22 calibre rifle, at 90 feet (27 m).
Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia

Calumet Devil’s Food Cake

Recipe from “Calumet Cook Book” published in 1921
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In context:
Devil’s food cake
is a moist, airy, rich chocolate layer cake. It is considered a counterpart to the white or yellow angel food cake. Because of differing recipes and changing ingredient availability over the course of the twentieth century, it is difficult to precisely qualify what distinguishes Devil’s food from the more standard chocolate cake, though it traditionally has more chocolate than a regular chocolate cake, making it darker. The cake is usually paired with a rich chocolate frosting.
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Eggs Poached In Cream

Recipe from “Delicious Dairy Dishes” published in 1936
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In context:
A poached egg is an egg that has been cooked by poaching, that is, in simmering liquid. This method of preparation is favoured because a very consistent and predictable result can be attained with precise timing, as the boiling point of water removes the temperature variable from the cooking process.
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7-Up Floats

Recipes from a 7-Up ad from 1954
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Forecast:
Bright and smiley faces
When you serve this double treat
Take Seven-Up …your favourite ice cream…
And there’s a team that’s hard to beat!

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Cranberry Juice Cocktail

Recipe from “Cranberries – and how to cook them” published in 1938
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In context:
Cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs or trailing vines in the subgenus Oxycoccus of the genus Vaccinium. In some methods of classification, Oxycoccus is regarded as a genus in its own right. They can be found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler regions of the northern hemisphere.

Cranberries are low, creeping shrubs or vines up to 2 metres (7 ft) long and 5 to 20 centimetres (2 to 8 in) in height; they have slender, wiry stems that are not thickly woody and have small evergreen leaves. The flowers are dark pink, with very distinct reflexed petals, leaving the style and stamens fully exposed and pointing forward. They are pollinated by bees. The fruit is a berry that is larger than the leaves of the plant; it is initially white, but turns a deep red when fully ripe. It is edible, with an acidic taste that can overwhelm its sweetness.
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Bo-Peep’s Party Pudding

Recipe from “The Junket Book” published in 1932
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In Context
junket-rennet-tabletsJunket is a milk-based dessert, made with sweetened milk and rennet, the digestive enzyme which curdles milk. It might best be described as a custard or a very soft, sweetened cheese.

To make junket, milk (usually with sugar and vanilla added) is heated to approximately body temperature and the rennet, which has been dissolved in water, is mixed in to cause the milk to "set". (Temperature variations will inactivate the enzyme in the rennet, causing the dessert to fail.) The dessert is chilled prior to serving. Junket is often served with a sprinkling of grated nutmeg on top. For most of the 20th century in the eastern United States, junket was often a preferred food for ill children, mostly due to its sweetness and ease of digestion.

The same was true in the United Kingdom where, in medieval times, junket had been a food of the nobility made with cream, not milk, and flavoured with rosewater and spices as well as sugar. It started to fall from favour during the Tudor era, being replaced by syllabubs on fashionable banqueting tables and, by the 18th century, had become an everyday food sold in the streets. In the United States, junket is commonly made with a prepackaged mix of rennet and sweetener from a company eponymously known as Junket.
Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia

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