Ted Is Heading For The Coast

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Pork Knuckle In Beer And Apple Juice / Svineknoke I Øl Og Eplemost

A recipe from Norway’s most popular food site the newspaper VG’s godt.no. Recipe composed by Lise Finckenhagen

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traditional-badge2_thumb1One of the obvious food trends we see more of here in Norway presently is the idea of ​​going back to the traditional ways regarding both dishes, techniques and ingredients. But often with a modern twist. This recipe composed by popular radio and TV cook and well known food blogger Lise Finckenhagen is a great example of this.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Related articles

Hague’s Bluff / Haags Bløff

A recipe from “European Favourites” (Europeiske Favoritter) published by Collins in 1973

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A Dutch dessert, Hague’s Bluff, so-called because the Dutch say the people of the Hague are frothy and make a lot out of almost nothing as this dish does.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Furmenty With Venison / Furmenty Med Hjortekjøtt

Recipes from late 14th – mid 15th century Britain found at Let Hem Boyle

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Since a lot of the ingredients in medieval recipes are unknown to most of us I’ve added a list of the most common ones with explanation and the closest modern equivalent for those of you who want to try out some of these recipes. Click the link above for the list – Ted

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Cold Boiled Salmon / Kald Kokt Laks

A recipe from “Cattelins Kokebok” (Cattelin’s Cook Book) published by Den Norske Bokklubb in 1977

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Cattelin’s is one of the best and most reasonably priced restaurants in Stockholm. It has survived wars, disasters, and changing tastes, and still manages to pack ‘em in, so they must be doing something right. Read morehere and here.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Kaju Curry / Cashew Nut Curry / Cashew Nøtt Karri

An Indian recipe from Shobha’s Zayaka found on mytaste.in

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Kaju curry is a popular Indian dish, which is a must dish in every Indian restaurant’s menu. It is prepared during special & festive occasions. Curries are all about flavours & aroma. Kaju curry is a rich, flavourful curry made of cashew nuts,Indian spices & the rich, silky, creamy & smooth gravy made this dish really delicious, tasty. Kaju curry can be prepared with a lot of variations.You can add paneer, capsicum, green peas, potatoes etc.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Soft Drink & Soda Saturday – Orangina

885_orangina_011935 – Orangina‘s origin

At the Marseilles Trade Fair, a Spanish pharmacist, Dr. Trigo, presents his new  invention, Naranjina, a sparkling and natural drink made of orange juice and pulp. Seduced by the recipe, Leon Beton buys the concept and launches it on the Algerian market.


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1936 – Orangina starts off

The trademark Orangina is registered


1951 – Orangina’s launch in France

Jean Claude Beton, who took over the company from his father in 1947,  creates "La Compagnie Française des produits Orangina" at Boufarik, in  Algeria. He starts producing Orangina for France, where the product reawakens the joys of summer and the youthful spirit that blossomed after World War II.


885_orangina_051953 – Orangina’s First Poster

The first Orangina advertisement is created by Bernard Villemot – a poster showing a sunshade made from an orange peel against a blue  background. This lays the foundation for future communication; a legendary brand is born.


1962 – The settlement in Marseille

Algeria enters the era of independence and La Compagnie Française des produits Orangina moves to Marseilles.

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1972 – The born of the shaking motion

Orangina builds up its brand identity with a new and original communication campaign based on an easily recognizable and distinctive concept: the shaking motion.The first TV ad, "Le Tic du Barman" (The Barman’s Twitch) marks the beginning of a long era of breakthrough advertisements.


885_orangina_061984 – Orangina starts conquering the world

Orangina joins the Pernod-Ricard Group – a springboard towards the boom in Orangina world exports. TV ad "La Piscine" (The Pool) by Jean Paul Goudeenjoys great success.


1985 – The first Orangina 1.5 L bottle

Orangina launches the first family-size bottle in PET material.


885_orangina_071988 – The launch of Orangina Light

Once again it is the first in its segment in France.


1992 – The first European TV commercial

Orangina develops its first pan-European screening of the film "La Balançoire" (The Swing), which emphasizes the French Mediterranean heritage of the brand.


885_orangina_081996 – The launch of Orangina Rouge

The French market launches Orangina Rouge, a new variety using blood oranges. The first TV commercial for Orangina Rouge is a great success. Because the drink is made from blood oranges, the advertisement parodies a horror movie.


2001 – Orangina becomes part of Cadbury Schweppes

Pernod-Ricard sells its soft drink activity (including Orangina) to Cadbury-Schweppes.


2008 – The launch of the PET bulby bottle

A new packaging is launched with the first 25cl bulby-shaped PET bottle in a 6-pack, for consumer convenience.

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2008 – The new Orangina logo

Orangina integrates the iconic bulby bottle design in the logo

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Text from  Orangina.eu

West-End Salad / West-End Salat

A recipe from “Småretter” (Snacks) published by Hjemmets Kokebok Klubb in 1979

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Roasted Almonds / Brente Mandler

A traditional recipe found at the Norwegian newspaper VG’s food pages godt.no. Recipe by confectioner Elin Vatnar Nilsen at krem.no

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traditional badge2_thumb[1]Roasted almonds are a traditional Norwegian Christmas treats that taste of childhood. The almonds has a roasted flavour and gets a thin layer of caramel that melts on the tongue. One chew and you’re hooked!

If you want to make roasted almonds you must use some elbow grease. Use a big pot, then the almonds want get so easily burnt. If you use a cast iron pot it will be even easier. A teaspoon or two of cinnamon makes the almonds extra Christmassy and you can try adding other flavours as well.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Meatballs In Brown Sauce With Creamed Cabbage Or Green Pea Puree / Kjøttkaker I Brun Saus Med Stuakål Eller Ertestuing

A traditional Norwegian recipe from the popular food site MatPrat
Image from lokalhistoriewiki.no

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I know I mentioned that «Mutton In Cabbage» was elected Norway’s national dish 40 years ago in a post about that dish, and It was actually re-elected quite recently. On the other hand,  I think very many Norwegian think about meatballs in brown sauce with either creamed cabbage or green pea puree as the most Norwegian dish of all. And few would dream of eating it without a nice dash of cranberry jam or fresh cranberries stirred with sugar like you see on the picture above.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Potato patties / Potetlapper

A recipe from “Sommermat” (Summer Food) published by Hjemmets Kokebok Klubb in 1979

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Potato patties are user friendly. They are easy to make, easy to store and can be used for just about anything. You can decide for yourself which tastes version you want, it can be made sweet or salty, or with onion or other tasteful ingredients. And Potato patties are seasonally independent, and suitable as a good meal all year round for breakfast, lunch, dinner, a quick sandwich or a midnight snack. The recipe shown here is a lunch/light dinner version.

“Raggmunk” is a Swedish version: fried potato patties served with fried bacon and lingonberry jam, easy to make and very tasty.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Smoked Salmon Patè / Røkelakspatè

A recipe from “Lettvint For Små Familier” (Easy For Small Families) published by Hjemmets Kokebok klubb in 1979

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This is an easily made ​​dish that will impress. It pays to buy the tail piece of salmon or trout for this dish. Tail piece is cheaper than buying the fish in slices. Tuna patè can be made the same way.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Christmas Cake / Julekake

A traditional Norwegian recipe from the popular food site MatPrat

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traditional badge2_thumb[1]The name of this cake is almost a contradiction in terms as it is usually eaten the whole year round in Norway, but I know few who actually eat it during Christmas. At home we had it it ever so often as it was one of my father’s favourites. In Norway one usually serve Christmas cake sliced with butter and Norwegian brown cheese (a rather sweet cheese typical for Norway). Just butter will do nicely if you can’t get hold of brown cheese (most people find that jams and jellies don’t go well with Christmas cake).

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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In Context
Brown cheese or whey cheese is the generic name for cheeses that are made by boiling the whey and adding milk and/or cream. Brown cheese is according to international definitions not really cheese, because the whey is separated. Rather, it is classified as a caramelized concentrate of whey added milk and cream. A consequence of the production process is that almost half of the dry substance is lactose, which is what causes it to turn brown and giving it the marked sweetness in taste.

Brown cheese is a distinctly Norwegian dairy products. The only place outside Norway where such cheese to some extent is produced is in Sweden east of Sør-Trøndelag. Beyond that there is also some cases of using precooked whey in other cultures, but without any industrial production having come out of it. It is regarded as Norway’s national sandwich spread, and whole wheat bread with brown cheese is often used as an image of Norwegian prudence and frugality. Norwegians abroad often miss the brown cheese deeply, which has lead to frequent serving of waffles with brown cheese at  the Norwegian Seaman’s Missions around the world. You can also buy brown cheese several places where many Norwegians are vacationing or have settled, including Spain.

Three Cold Entrées / Tre Kalde Forretter

Recipes from “Mat Som Smaker” (Tasty Food) published by Schribsted in 1968

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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Almond Kernel Pudding With Red Sauce / Mandelkjernepudding Med Rød Saus

A traditional desert recipe from the food side matoppskrifter.org

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traditional badge2_thumb[1]Nowadays you can get most types of puddings and gels ready made in your local store, but when I was a kid, these were homemade. And for many Norwegians my age childhood memories will probably come flowing with every spoonful of this delicious almond kernel pudding, or almond pudding as many call it. Served with delicious homemade red sauce. At our home, it was often decorated with fresh berries in season or thin slices of blanched almonds.

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes here:
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