Rosehip Soup / Nypesuppe

A traditional Norwegian dessert soup recipe from
bygdekvinnelaget.no
183_nypesuppe_post

000_recipe_eng_flagg Recipe in English  000_recipe_nor_flagg Oppskrift på norsk

Recipe posted at:
FoodieFridays_buttonthe-weekend-social-badge-small-msp-1fiestafriday

In context:
The rose hip, also known as rose haw or rose hep, is the fruit of the rose plant, that typically is red-to-orange, but ranges from dark purple to black in some species. Rose hips begin to form after successful pollination of flowers in spring or early summer, and ripen in late summer through autumn.

Usage
Rose hips are used for herbal teas, jam, jelly, syrup, rose hip soup, beverages, pies,bread, wine, and marmalade. They can also be eaten raw, like a berry, if care is used to avoid the hairs inside the fruit.

183_nypesuppe3Rose hips are commonly used as a herbal tea, often blended with hibiscus, and also as an oil. They can also be used to make jam, jelly, marmalade, and rose hip wine. Rose hip soup, “nyponsoppa” “nypesuppe”, is especially popular in Norway and Sweden.

Rhodomel, a type of mead, is made with rose hips.

183_nypesuppe2Rose hips can be used to make palinka, a traditional Hungarian alcoholic beverage, popular in Hungary, Romania, and other countries sharing Austro-Hungarian history. Rose hips are also the central ingredient of cockta, the fruity-tasting national soft drink of Slovenia.

Oh, and remember, if you feel a little childish, the fine hairs found inside rose hips can be used as itching powder.

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6 thoughts on “Rosehip Soup / Nypesuppe

  1. I lost some of my rose bushes due to our harsh winter last year (even though they were wrapped). I probably need to plant more as I enjoy the flowers so much too. Thanks for bringing this to FF – I have printed the recipe for future use 🙂

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  2. Interesting soup, T-Ted… I love rosehips…and I’m almost thinking that I would serve it cold with the whipped cream. A wonderful summertime soup / dessert soup! ❤

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    • TidiousTed says:

      In Norway they grow wild these days, but has probably spread from 19th century gardens so you can pick them on the road and field edges on the country side at least in my part of the country. In my family it has always been served cold with a large dollop of whipped cream

      Rosehip soup and tea grew in popularity during WWII when a lot of food was impossible or hard to come by but now a days it is a lot more popular in Sweden than here in Norway, but in my family we had it quite often when I was a kid.

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