Must Eats In Norway – Part 1

431_frognersetra

At “Frognerseteren” in the hills outside Oslo city which you can easily reach by the subway system you will find Restaurant “Finstua” and “Seterstua” Café. The Café is open both summer and winter and opens every day at 11:00. The café has self service and no table reservation. If the weather allows you can enjoy the spectacular view of the Oslo city and fjord from the sunny terrace, while the café is warm and cosy in colder weather.

Their restaurant may have prizes a little too steep for your tourist budget but forget that, what you really need to enjoy at “Frognerseteren” is the café’s magnificent and famous apple cake. And take a tip from one who have eaten that apple cake more times than he can remember, forget the tea, forget the coffee, that apple cake should be enjoyed with the café’s delicious cocoa with cream – Ted

Advertisements

20 thoughts on “Must Eats In Norway – Part 1

  1. hah did you go there recently? Looks wonderful…ps i got my cabinet, am in heaven and already had a cocktail hehe x

    Like

  2. Kama says:

    I loved my trip to Frognerseteren but I totally don’t remember if we ate anything there. 😀 I’ll try the cake next time when I’m there. Thanks for tip. 🙂

    Like

  3. The building and decor is wonderful but the fog and rain settled in when I arrived=no view!!!

    Like

    • tidiousted says:

      But I hope you followed my advice andwentfor the cocoa 😉

      Like

        • tidiousted says:

          Good basic thinking 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        • tidiousted says:

          When I studied at the art and craft college in Oslo I used to sneak away with a couple of friends and go to Frognersetra and sit in the sun eating apple cake and drink cocoa 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          • That sounds idyllic! I loved the dragon style architecture. I’d so like to live in one! But it would look s little strange in Australia don’t you think? I imagine you came across a bit if traditional art and craft in the Oslo college. Did you study a particular stream of art/craft there or food/nutrition perhaps?

            Like

            • tidiousted says:

              I studied graphic design and illustration and specialised in calligraphy and handlettering. Later in life when the internet came I studied webdesign and that is what I mostly do these days 🙂 My interest in food, cooking and recipes has no basis in studies, I’m just an eager amateur 😉 Besides I’ve got a huge collection of old cook books.

              Liked by 1 person

              • What a wonderful background! Did you come across Norsk Rosemaling in your illustration/graphic studies? I am not sure if you know that I am one of the few people in Australia to practice that traditional art form, so that makes me curious about your studies.
                I think also that there are many of us that could relate to a large collection of cookbooks! I have got rid of some old ones, with the advent of the net, but still keep some very old ones with, mainly jams and preserve recipes that family gave to me. Even though you regard yourself an amateur, I imagine with a resource such as your collection, you must be pretty experienced.

                Like

                • tidiousted says:

                  Of course I know a thing or two about “Norsk Rosemaling”. I’ve never done any myself, but I lived 11 years in Telemark where rosemaling is greatly appreciated. I’ve studied your rosemaling on your facebook page when I began following your blog so I’ve been aware of your work for a while. Your “Telmark roser” are great 🙂

                  My cook book collection feature more than 300 books ranging from 1900 – 1990. I think a book needs to be at least 25 years to beregarded as old. And as you may have noticed, I frequently post recipes from them.

                  I’ve been fond of cooking ever since I was a kid helping my mother in the kitchen, she was a great cook. So if not a profesional I’m as you suggest pretty experienced.

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • Thanks for your nice comment, but I also regard myself as an amateur in Rosemaling but it provides me with so much joy, I just do it for myself for the most part. There isn’t much call for it here, anyway. Mind you there are many Americans who are enthusiasts and very very talented in this area.
                    Learning from one’s parents is the best way to learn cooking I think! I guess I do have some cookbooks that are old… ie from the seventies, and sixties and the odd one from the fifties, some illustrations in them resesemble some of the recipes you have posted.
                    BTW, I am going to try making pjalt this weekend, but I am going to only make 1/4 of the quantity I think.

                    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s