Toast with Shrimp Stew / Toast med Rejestuvning

A recipe from the Danish “Småretter og Salater” (Snacks and Salads) in the “MENU Inrernational Madlexicon” series published by Lademann in 1975
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traditional badge danish_flatThe Danes are great with open face sandwiches whether they are cold or hot. This sandwich is a good example of what you can have with cup of tea or a cold bottle of beer at a Danish  café or inn – Ted

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Herbal Scones / Urtescones

A recipe from “Alt om Urter” (All about herbes) published by
Den Norske Bokklubben in 1985
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traditional badge british_flatScones is a typical British kind of baked goods, but it has over the years sneaked its way into Norwegian baking traditions as well. Probably because it is such a delicious little tidbit most Norwegians learn to apreciate on their summer holiday on the Isles – Ted

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Medieval Monday- Dornish Cream Cake / Dorniske Kremkaker

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A medieval recipe found at innatthecrossrod.com Dornish Cream Cakes_post

Original recipe: For three tarts, which should each be about a foot wide, take one quart of the best cream that you can find, and put it in a pan over the fire. And put two eggs, which are well beaten, into it, and when it begins to boil, then take six more eggs and let them be well beaten and put them into it, and some good flour and pour it slowly into the pan. And one should stir it constantly, so that it does not burn. After that, when the eggs have been poured in, throw a quarter of a pound of fresh butter into it and let it simmer together, until it becomes thick. Afterwards let it cool, and when it is cold, then put it into three pastry shells, each of which is a foot wide. And let it bake in the tart pan. If you would put it straight away on the table, then sprinkle a quarter pound of sugar over all three, together with a little rose water. And one should serve it forth while it is yet warm.

Das Kuchbuch der Sabina Welserin – 16th century

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Pichelsteiner Fleisch – German Meat Casserole / Tysk Kjøttgryte

A classic German recipe from “God Mat Fra Hele Verden”
(Delicious Food From All The World)  published
by
Schibsted in 1971
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It is quite likely that this stew originates from Bavaria, which is known for its many delicious casserole dishes.

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Chocolate Croissants / Sjokoladecroissanter

A baking recipe from “The Chocolate Book”
by Valerie Barrett published by Leisurebooks in 1987
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A lot of waiting for the dough to cool before you finally can sink your teeth into a steaming hot chocolate filled croissant. You decide if it’s worth the wait – Ted 😉

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Pike Filet with Nettles / Gjeddefilet med Nesler

A spring recipe from “Carl Butlers kokebok Fortsettelsen”
(Carl Butler’s Cook book-The Continuation)
published by Cappelen in 1991
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cover_smallIn 1974 cookbook history was written in Scandinavia. That year a bunch of foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, “Carl Butler’s Cookbook”. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of dried herbs and garlic this book is found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and traditional badge swedish_flatNorwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and patè on many a scandinavian’s table. This book was the first cook book I bought and I still got it and still use it.

It took 17 years before I and every other Scandinavian fan of the book could rush to the book store to buy the continuation. It is simply called “Carl Butler’s Cook book – The Continuation”. This recipe is the first one I post from that book, a lot of recipes from the one from 1974 has been posted already as they are also featured in a cook book Butler made for IKEA and I’ve posted lots of recipes from  that book – Ted

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Flûte Bernando

An evening snack found in the “Småretter og Salater”
(Snacks and Salads) part of the Danish
International food encyclopedia MENU published in 1975

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I’m not quite sure where that ever so French name on this evening snack comes from, it looks very Danish to me. A baguette, some cheese and a little sausage and any Dane can put together a mouth watering dish, perfect company for a dew fresh Tuborg or a Carlsberg – Ted

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Soft Drink and Soda Saturday–Nesbitt’s Orange Soda

116855_nes1Nesbitt’s was a popular brand of orange-flavoured soda pop in the United States during much of the 20th century. Nesbitt’s was produced by the Nesbitt Fruit Products Company of Los Angeles, California. The company also produced other flavours of soda pop under the Nesbitt’s brand and other brand names.


History

The Nesbitt’s Fruit Products Company was founded in 1924, named after its founder Hugh S. Nesbitt. The Nesbitt’s brand debuted in 1927, initially as part of the company’s line of soda fountain-products. Nesbitt’s began bottling Nesbitt’s orange in either 1938 or the following year, putting it in direct competition with established market-leader Orange Crush. Nesbitt’s became the U.S. market leader of orange soda pop during the late 1940s and 1950s, with advertisements featuring a then-unknown model named Marilyn Monroe (1946) and proclaiming itself to be the “Largest selling bottled orange drink in the world”. Nesbitt’s own brand of orange beverage was surpassed in popularity by Fanta in the 1960s and faded in popularity. In 1972, the company was sold to The Clorox Company, and in April 1975, the bottling operation was sold to Moxie Industries, Inc. (now Monarch Beverage) of Atlanta.


116855_nes2Resurrection and legacy

Nesbitt’s continued to be owned by Moxie Industries through the late 1970s and the 1980s while use of the Nesbitt’s brand (for non-bottling usage) was passed along to several companies from 1976 through 1998, including ownership by Borden Inc. in the late 1980s. In 1999, Big Red, Limited of Waco, Texas, the parent company that owns rights to the Big Red soft drink brand, bought the Nesbitt’s trademark from the Monarch Beverage Company under its North American Beverages Products division, which also includes NuGrape. Although Big Red, Ltd. only actively promotes its Nesbitt’s California Honey Lemonade product, it licenses the brand to several small independent bottling companies.

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Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Apple Braids / Eplestenger

A classic Norwegian recipe found on the now defunct magasin.info638_eplestang_post

An apple braid is always welcome on a Norwegian coffee table, popular as it is among young and old. Acidic, sweet and delicious.

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Fine Liver Pâté / Fin Leverpostei

A recipe from “Kalv- og Oksekjøtt” (Veal and Beef)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979
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traditional badge2This pâté makes a delicious evening meal served with crispy bacon, pickled gherkins and beets, roasted onions and a mushroom salad with paprika, parsley, oil/vinegar marinade and baguettes or wholemeal bread.

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In Context:
Liver pâté has been staple sandwich spread for children here in Norway since long before I was a kid back in the fifties and sixties and ads for the different commercially produced pâtés are blatantly geared towards children and their parents, claiming liver pâté keeps the children fit and makes them strong. The oldest product has even for decades had a picture of a child on the lid on their tins.

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I’m a good example that this kind of advertising works, I still greatly enjoy a sanwich spread with the same liver pâté I ate as a child (the one pictured here). Of course with pickled gherkins or beets as my mother would make them back then. There are a lot of good memories in good food – Ted  😉

A Brief History of Spam, an American Meat Icon

TowerCanTemplateFor a six-ingredient food product, it’s taken on a life of its own. Spam — the square-shaped mash-up of pork, water, salt, potato starch, sugar, and sodium nitrate — recently celebrated its 77th anniversary of being alternately maligned, celebrated, musicalized, or the subject of urban legend (one particularly pervasive myth insists that its name is actually an acronym for “Scientifically Processed Animal Matter”). And despite today’s more locavore approach to food and some unkind memories from soldiers who were served Spam during WWII, Spam has entered its third quarter-century on the rise. More than eight billion cans have been sold since the Hormel Corporation unleashed the product in 1937; it’s currently available in 44 countries throughout the world.

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Spam’s ability to straddle highbrow and lowbrow is apparently in its DNA: Since its early days, even Jay Hormel, the man who Spam made rich, had a vexed relationship with the lunchmeat. In a 1945 “Talk of the Town” profile published in The New Yorker, Hormel met writer Brendan Gill over noontime drinks, during which Gill “got the distinct 000_spam_04impression that being responsible for Spam might be too great a burden on any one man.” The piece sees Hormel waffling on his brand’s association with Spam, spending equal time distancing himself from it (“Sometimes I wonder if we shouldn’t have…”) and defending it (“Damn it, we eat it in our own home”).

The budget-friendly meat has enjoyed a recent upswing on the American mainland in part thanks to rising meat costs and a floundering economy: When the recession hit in early 2008, Spam saw its sales jump 10 percent compared to the previous year. A CBS News report noted that the increased numbers were seemingly accompanied by a cultural shift: Even consumers who continued to purchase expensive organic vegetables were adding cans of Spam to their pantries. The meat, once relegated as a quirk of Hawaiian or Asian cuisine, started 000_spam_02appearing on haute restaurant menus as a nod to that highbrow/lowbrow mash-up, or perhaps to the chef’s feelings of nostalgia for the ingredient. (A quick search of Spam recipes from the ’60s reveals dishes like Spam upside-down pie; and Spam sandwiches topped with baked beans.)

Today, its sometimes-kitsch factor is a point of pride, for both Hormel and Spam fans: You can show your affection for Spam with everything from Hormel-authorized T-shirts (reading “I think, therefore I Spam”) to crocheted, cat-shaped Spam musu000_spam_06bi (available for purchase, naturally, on Etsy). Here’s a look back at how Spam first got canned, why it’s currently beloved in Hawaii and South Korea, and why Spam remains on many restaurant menus today.

That recipe, using pork shoulder (once considered an undesirable byproduct of hog butchery), water, salt, sugar, and sodium nitrate (for coloring) remained unchanged until 2009, when Hormel began adding potato starch to sop up the infamous gelatin “layer” that naturally forms when meat is cooked. According to Behne, the recipe change was purely an aesthetic choice: “It looks a lot better now when you open the can.” The rest, Hormel insists, has remained the same.

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Although lore behind the name Spam varies, Hormel himself claimed the product was named for a combination of the words “spice” and “ham,” despite the fact that neither ingredient appears in Spam. The confusion has led some to speculate that Spam is an acronym for “Shoulder of Pork And Ham,” but company line gives Kenneth Daigneau, the brother of a Hormel VP, credit for naming the product. As Hormel tells it, he launched a naming contest for the new product during a New Year’s Eve party, when Daigneau spit out “Spam” as if “it were nothing at all,” Hormel told Gill. “I knew then and there that the name was perfect.”

Text from eater.com

Hokkaido Milk Bread / Hokkaido Melkebrød

A classic Asian bread recipe found on food52.com
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traditional badge asian_flatMilk bread is a staple in Asian bakeries. It’s a pillowy-soft, sweet, and fragrant enriched bread made with cream and a special roux-like paste called tangzhong, which adds structure to the crumb to yield an especially fluffy, cloud-like texture.

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Picnic Salad / Picnicsalat

A recipe from “Norsk Ukeblads Store Salatbok”
(Norsk Ukeblad’s Big Salad Book) published in 1984
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traditional badge picnic_flatMake this salad, fill suitable containers with it. Bring it, fresh bread or rolls and something nice to drink to the park, the beach, the woods or where ever you fancy holding your picnic. And remember, have a good time – That’s an order – Ted  😉

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Aïoli with Vegetables / Aïoli med Grønnsaker

A vegetarian dish found in “Spennenede Mat” (Exciting Food)
published by Skadinavisk Presse in 1980

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Aïoli is the traditional accompaniment for the French fish soup Bouillabaisse but aïoli can also be served with lightly cooked fresh vegetables or like in this recipe, in the French style, as a dip for raw vegetables.

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La Pipérade – Basque Omelette / Baskisk Omelett

A recipe from “Fransk Bondekost” (French Farmhouse Cooking) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
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traditional badge french_flatLa Pipérade, a creamy yet firm and spicy omelette full of fresh vegetables.

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