Home Made Norwegian Cordials

I’ve posted a lot of different porridge recipes on this blog and what we usually drink with these porridge here is a drink made from either shop bought or homemade cordials. Every Norwegian grocer will have a wide range of cordials for sale.

In my childhhod, back in the fifties and sixties this was a usual drink for kids for any kind of meal really, sodas was just for special occations back then and home made cordials was quite common.

saftThese cordials could be made from a lot of different berries or fruits; plums, cherries, rhubarb, black currants, red currants, blueberries, raspberries and strawberries and more seldom cranberries or combinations of several of these. And most homes had a special kind of pan for making cordials, a lot still have and make cordials every autumn.

Both blueberry and black currant cordials served as a hot toddy are still believed to have a healing effect on the common cold. And when I was a kid one could buy hot black currant toddy at any given winter sport arrangement. And in my childhood all boys and girls were well behaved if promised “saft og boller” – cold drinks made with cordials and fresh buns.

Cordials have other uses than drink of course, they are great for making sorbets, dessert sauces, adding taste to home made ice cream and cakes. Besides they make a very good basis for liqueurs if you are short of time.

Cordial Pan

saftkoker

The cordial pan is stacked like this; (1) at the bottom, (2) on top of that with (3) inside of that and (4) on the top. Steam from water boiling in (1) reaches the berries and fruit through the holes in (3) and raw cordial drips down into (2) and can be poured out via (5) which can be closed and open as needed.

What you get out of the cordial pan is called “råsaft” (raw cordial) and can be frozen for further use. To make real cordial you have to cook the raw cordial with sugar and a little wine acid. Both sugar and wine acid will work as conserving agents and will make the cordial keep for ages.

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