The Christmas Recipes – Part 7

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Danish Cardinal Punch / Dansk Kardinalpunch
Danish Cardinal Punch / Dansk Kardinalpunch

Grapefruit In Brandy / Grapefrukt I Konjakk
Grapefruit In Brandy / Grapefrukt I Konjakk

Cured Beef / Gravet Oksekjøtt
Cured Beef / Gravet Oksekjøtt

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Cuttyhunk Swordfish Steak Tokay / Cuttyhunk Sverdfiskbiff Tokay

A sworfish recipe found in “Seafood ‘n Seaports –
a Cook’s Tour of Massachusetts”

Cuttyhunk Swordfish Steak Tokay / Cuttyhunk Sverdfisk Biff Tokay

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Russian Meatballs / Russiske Kjøttboller

A Russian recipe found in “Internasjoale Familie Favoritter”
(International Family Favourites) published in 1976

Russian Meatballs / Russiske Kjøttboller

If you love recipes with a lot of ingredients this recipe will really
make your day. That is a promise – Ted  😉

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 6

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Christmas Fruit Cake / Julens Fruktkake
Christmas Fruit Cake / Julens Fruktkake

Chocolate & Mint Toffees / Sjokolade Og Mintkarameller
Chocolate & Mint Toffees / Sjokolade Og Mintkarameller

Quince and Geranium Jelly / Kvede og Geranium Gelé

A classic English preserve recipe found in
“Harrods Cookery Book” published in 1985

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The golden, down-covered quince changes color when it is cooked to give a pinkish-amber jelly. This autumnal fruit is high in pectin and is therefore ideal for jams, jellies and preserves. For an English touch to a meal, serve with meat or poultry.

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Pommes de Terre au Pistou – French Basil Potatoes / Franske Basilikumpoteter

A delicious potato recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in in 1980

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This is a very tasty way to prepare potatoes done in French
farmhouses and it can be served with most fried dishes.

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Medieval Monday – Sauge – Chicken with Sage Sauce / Kylling med Salviesaus

A 15th Century recipe found on One Year and Thousand Eggs
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A recipe from From the 15th Century cook book Harleian MS. 279, Volume I, found on One Year and Thousand Eggs a treasure chest of a blog for anyone interested in medieval recipes.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 5

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Lamb Ribs With Mashed Root Vegetables /Pinnekjøtt Med Rotmos
Lamb Ribs With Mashed Root Vegetables /
Pinnekjøtt Med Rotmos

Mustard Herring / Sennepsild
Mustard Herring / Sennepsild

Somerset Chicken / Somersetkylling

An English chicken recipe found in “Fjærfe på Menyen”
(Poultry on the Menu) published by
Den Norske Bokklubben in 1984
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Fragilities / Fragiliteter

A delicate cake recipe found in “Det Nye Kjøkkenbiblioteket”
(The New Kitchen Library) published in 1971

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Sometimes it may be difficult to understand the background for some cake name. Regarding fragilities, one may feel fairly sure. These cakes are in fact delicate and fragile, just what one in French and English would call “fragile”.

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DIY Sunday – Wheeled “Snack Shack”

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The plans for this nifty little sales stand was published in “Popular Mechanics” in January 1940. Great for those of you who wants to cash in on your cooking. Just pull it along to where people congregate, whether it be a sport arangemet, a summer beach or a park. The plans can be downloaded in pdf format by clicking the icon below.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 4

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Christmas Kisses / Julekyss
Christmas Kisses / Julekyss

Prune Porridge / Sviskegrøt
Prune Porridge / Sviskegrøt

Danish Pork Roast with Browned Potatoes / Dansk Svinestek med Brunede Poteter

A classic Danish dinner recipe found in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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If you’ve never tried to brown potatoes like the Danish do you’re
in for a real treat. They are absolutely delicious.

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Toast à la Amsterdam / Amsterdamer Toast

A delicious toast recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Skaninavisk Press as in 1977

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If you have followed this blog for some time you might have noticed that I’m more than usually fond of sandwiches and toasts. Well, here’s another one _ Ted 😉

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Jolly Cola – An Original Danish Soft Drink

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Jolly Cola is an original Danish soft drink dating back to 1959. Today, Jolly Cola is produced by the Danish brewery ‘Vestfyen’, which also produces Jolly Light, the sports drink Jolly Time and Jolly Orange. Up until the 1980s, Jolly Cola had a market share of about 40% of the Danish cola market. This was extraordinary, as Denmark is the only country in the world, where another cola than the original Coca Cola has had a larger market share. Jolly Cola is probably most famous for its slogan “Say Jolly to your cola!”, but having reached its 50th birthday, this slogan will be followed by “Free your taste”.

The history of Jolly Cola

Jolly Cola_06Following WW2, many countries in the world viewed Coca Cola as synonymous with the US and an American life-style, and as the US developed and increased its influence on society, so did Coca Cola. In the meantime, the Danish population still had to wait until 1959, before they could buy a bottle of Coca Cola. Admittedly, Coca Cola had been marketed with moderate success from the middle of the 1930s, but then came a war, followed by rationing of sugar and finally a special tax on cola, which made the soft drink just as expensive as a beer, and therefore kept it out of the Danish market. The taxation came as a result of skilled lobbyism, carried out by breweries and producers of mineral water – and it worked as intended.

Jolly Cola_05Following the implementation of the tax in 1953, only 10,000 litres of cola soft drinks were sold in Denmark a year, primarily produced by minor Danish producers of mineral water, avoiding the competition from the American giant. However, the opposition against the taxation grew, and by the end of the 1950s it was only the communists and conservative powers in Danish politics, which had close connections to the brewing industry, that wanted a prohibitive surtax on what a member of the Danish Communist Party called “a bitter cup”

When the Danish producers finally realised that they could not keep Coca Cola out of the Danish market anymore, they quickly changed their strategy. In January 1959 18 breweries and producers of mineral water went together to form ‘Dansk Coladrik A/S’. This initiative was instigated by Carlsberg and Tuborg so as to produce an original Danish cola that was to be sold nationwide. The soft drink was named Jolly Cola and was an all-out copy product. This regarded not only the taste, but also the organisation behind the product, which completely resembled Coca Cola, especially in terms of having a strong and centralised control of quality and marketing, combined with local bottling departments.

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Suddenly, the strategy seemed to be that if you could not get rid of Coca Cola, the least you could do was to ensure that the Danish population drank Danish produced cola. To a great extent, this was a success, and when the taxation was removed and ‘the great Danish cola war’ broke out in July 1959, Jolly Cola actually conquered a significant part of the new market. In July 1959 alone, nine million bottles of Jolly Cola were sold, compared to five million bottles of Coca Cola.

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This was an incredible number compared to an annual sale of 40 to 50,000 bottles in 1958. Naturally, the sheer interest of the news explains a part of the increased sale, but so does the summer of 1959, which was exceptionally good. Nevertheless, when the market finally stabilised, roughly every fifth sold soft drink in Denmark was a cola, and approximately 40% was Jolly Cola. Jolly Cola maintained this market share up until the 1980s.

Jolly Cola_07There are several explanations for Jolly Cola’s success. However, the most important one is that ‘Dansk Coladrik’ could make use of the brewing industry’s comprehensive network, distributing system and knowledge of the Danish market. For example, it is a known fact the Danish breweries supplied the restaurants and pubs. Another reason is that it was only possible to buy Coca Cola in Copenhagen and a few larger cities in Jutland in the early years of the hectic ‘cola war’. Hence, it was not until the 1960s that it was possible to buy Coca Cola nationwide.

Jolly Cola_04This ensured that Jolly Cola was a well-established product in many places, when Coca Cola finally ventured into the market. Thirdly, it was due to great marketing. Dansk Coladrik A/S had e.g. tapped their cola in regular soft drink bottles. This made it easier for the retail industry to administer the returnable bottle system, but it also made it possible to launch Jolly Cola as “The Big Cola” (a slogan that not by coincidence resembled Pepsi’s success-slogan about the big 12 ounce bottle from the 1930s USA). A

A Danish soft drink bottle contained exactly 25 cl, whereas the characteristic ‘chubby’ Coca Cola bottle only contained 19 cl. The argument about value for your money was important in a time where a soft drink was considered to be a luxury product. (The story of Jolly Cola is based on the work of Klaus Petersen and Niels Arne Sørensen from the Institute of History, Culture and Society).

Today’s Jolly

Jolly Cola_08In the 1980s Jolly Cola still had around 60% of the Danish cola market, but in the 1990s they experienced a decrease in sales. In 1999 the failing sales numbers forced the Co-operative Wholesale Society (FDB) to remove Jolly Cola from its shelves. Following this, Jolly Cola only made up 6% of the total Danish soft drink market in 2002, which was again reduced to 2% in 2003. In the same year, a trial between the brewery ‘Vestfyen’ and the association of Danish breweries almost compromised Jolly Cola’s existence. ‘Vestfyen’ believed that the association of Danish breweries would rather market Pepsi Cola at the expense of Jolly Cola. In September 2003, however, ‘Vestfyen’ took over all stocks dealing with the struggling soft drink so as to engage in a turn-around of the product. This became an immense success, and in 2004 Jolly Cola actually made up 25% of Coop Denmark’s cola sales.

You can see two Jolly Cola commercials with
supermodel Tina Kjær here and here

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia