Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Nedick’s

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Nedick’s was an American chain of fast-food restaurants that originated in New York City in 1913 or the early 1920s, per differing sources, and expanded in the 1950s to Newark, New Jersey; Albany, New York; Boston, Massachusetts; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Baltimore, Maryland; and Washington, D.C. Originally known for making and selling a signature orange drink, it added coffee and donuts to its simple menu, and later hot dogs with a unique mustard relish in a toasted bun. The name was formed from the last names of Robert T. Neely and Orville A. Dickinson, who founded the chain with the original stand in a hotel storefront of the Bartholdi Hotel at 23rd Street and Broadway. The chain was known for its orange and white decor and its slogan, “Good food is never expensive at Nedick’s”. Another slogan, evidenced by the image at right, was “Always a pleasure”.

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Following intense competition in the 1970s from such national chains as McDonald’s and Dunkin’ Donuts, and much criticism in 1981 for the quality of its concession at the Central Park Zoo, Nedick’s ceased operations.

Revival of the brand name

nedicks_04In 2003, the Riese Organization, which operates a number of restaurant chains such as Dunkin’ Donuts and Pizza Hut, revived the Nedick’s brand, with three restaurants by that name in New York City, at Penn Station; 1286 Broadway between 33rd & 34th Street; and 416 8th Avenue, at West 31st Street. All of these locations have since closed, and Nedick’s is no longer featured on Riese Restaurants webpage.

In popular culture

nedicks_03Nedick’s was a long-time New York landmark; The New York Times in 2003 recalled the chain as “The Starbucks of New York”.

Nedick’s was a sponsor of the New York Knicks basketball team. This gave rise to the catchphrase of the Knicks’ long-time radio announcer, Marty Glickman: “Good like Nedick’s”, intoned after the team scored a basket. Another common phrase was, “Meet me outside Nedick’s”; as a well-known and highly visible location, it was a common place to rendezvous with people.

nedicks_05In the musical On The Town, sailors Gabey, Ozzie, and Chip agree to meet at Nedick’s in Times Square at eleven.

Nedick’s is name-dropped in the liner notes to Leo Kottke’s 6- and 12-String Guitar.

A popular punchline from the heyday of the chain was “I’ll meet you in the Orange Room of the Hotel Nedick’s.”

In his 1971 album, When I Was a Kid, Bill Cosby talked about when he and his Boy Scout troop went on a hike around Fairmount Park in his hometown of Philadelphia. When the police forbade them setting up camp in the park, the

nedicks_01troop went to Nedick’s to eat their lunch (canned beans) before going home.

In the M*A*S*H Season Four episode, “Dear Peggy”, Hawkeye Pierce talks about watching Klinger eat a fresh egg he won in a poker game and facetiously says that for a moment, it evoked the air of “fine dining at Nedick’s in Grand Central Station.”

The Nedick’s neon sign can be seen in several location shots in Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver.

In Audre Lorde’s poem, “Who Said It Was Simple,” the speaker can perceive, just “Sitting at Nedick’s,” the intersections of race, gender and class in the liberation movements of the 1970’s.

Text from Wikipedia

Daffodil Cake / Påskeliljekake

A fancy cake recipe just right for the upcoming Easter
found in “Igleheart Cake Secrets” published in 1928
Daffodil Cake / Påskeliljekake

This is the second of these old Igleheart’s cookbooks from the 1920s I’m posting from and again I’m struck by how little baking recipes and traditions have changed over the years in comparison with other food. We seem to like cakes and cookies to be as they always have been and I find that rather pleasant in our modern world of constant change – Ted

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Butterscotch Cream Dessert Cake / Dessertkake med Karamellkrem

A delicious cake recipe found in “Baker’s Favorite
Chocolate Recipes” published in 1943
Butterscotch Cream Dessert Cake / Dessertkake med Karamellkrem

This book has a lot of great illustration in down toned colours that really caught my attention. I have not tried to brighten up the colours, just given them a little more depth as they probably would have lost some over the last close to 75 years – Ted

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Grilled Flatbread / Grillede Flate Brød

A great Italian inspired flatbread recipe found on food52.comGrilled Flatbread / Grillede Flate Brød

Grilling is a stone age way of baking bread but don’t let that lead you to thing that bread baked this way isn’t just delicious. Particularly when using this Italian inspied recipe complete with olive oil, salt flakes and rosemary.

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Shrimp and Orange en Coquille / Reker og Appelsin en Coquille

A shelfish recipe found in “Famous Florida Chef’s
Favourite Citrus Recipes” published in 1970

Shrimp and Orange en Coquille / Reker og Appelsin en Coquille

En Qoquille; any of various seafood or chicken dishes baked with a sauce and usually served in a scallop shell or a shell-shaped serving dish.

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Easy Thai Chicken Soup with Coconut Milk / Enkel Thai Kyllingsuppe med Kokosmelk

A spicy Thai soup recipe found on godt.no
Easy Thai Chicken Soup with Coconut Milk / Enkel Thai Kyllingsuppe med Kokosmelk

A lovely warming soup with lots of flavor that will make a family favourite at the first go. Make some extra, freeze it and you have a delicious quick dinner for a buzy day.

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Basket Bread / Kurvbrød

A traditional Scandinacian baking technique
found on dansukker.no

Basket Bread / Kurvbrød

Have you ever baked basket bread? If not, you ought to try it. It is fun! When it comes to baskets, it’s best to use plastic ones for they are water-resistant which makes them easier to clean after use.

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Lamb in Yogurt Sauce / Lam i Yoghurtsaus

A clamb recipe found in “Gryteretter” (Casseroles)
by Jennie Reekie published in Norwegian in 1977
Lamb in Yogurt Sauce / Lam i Yoghurtsaus

The lamb yogurt combination is known from a lot of different
cousins. We know it from Greece, North Africa the Indian subcontinent
and several other places. The book gives no clue to where this recipe comes from but an educated guess might place it in Northern Africa

Ted
Winking smile

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A Brief History of Vanilla

A Brief History of Vanilla

Vanilla is the only fruit-bearing member of the orchid family and is native to central Mexico. The ancient Totonac Indians of Mexico were A Brief History of Vanillathe first to learn to use the fruit of the Tlilxochitl vine, vanilla pods. After their defeat by the Aztecs, they were forced to relinquish control of the exotic fruit.

The Aztecs were, in turn, defeated by the Spanish, who returned home with the precious vanilla beans – which were for many years, enjoyed only by the nobility and the very rich. Eventually, the use of vanilla, while still quite expensive, became widespread throughout Europe.

Thomas Jefferson is credited with introducing vanilla to the United States in the late 1700s. While serving as Ambassador to France, he learned the use of vanilla beans, and when he returned to the A Brief History of VanillaUnited States, brought vanilla beans with him.

Today, vanilla beans are grown in several distinct regions of the world. This produces vanilla beans with unique regional characteristics and attributes, each particularly suited to different uses.

Madagascar, the world’s largest producer of vanilla beans, is the source of the famed Madagascar Bourbon vanilla and still produces the world’s finest and most consistent vanilla. (Incidentally, the term “Bourbon” has nothing to do with the liquor produced in Kentucky – but rather, derives its name from the old name for Madagascar – the Bourbon Islands.)

Madagascar Bourbon vanilla is considered to be the highest quality pure vanilla available, typified by a creamy, sweet, smooth, mellow flavor. Madagascar Bourbon Vanilla is known for its “staying power”, which makes it especially suited to pairing with rich foods.

A Brief History of Vanilla

Mexico, where vanilla originated, now produces only a small percentage of the harvest. Mexican vanilla beans, grown by skilled producers that carefully harvest and cure every pod. It’s this process that produces Mexican vanilla of exceptionally high quality and flavor.

Spicy Mexican vanilla is known by its creamy flavor that complements dishes that contain chocolate, cinnamon and other warm spices. A teaspoon or so of Mexican vanilla in tomato sauces or with citrus can also help reduce acidity.

A Brief History of VanillaThe last of the four major vanilla-producing regions is Tahiti. Tahitian vanilla, grown from a different genus of vanilla orchid (Vanilla Tahitensis Moore), is flowery, fruity and smooth.

Long a favorite of professional bakers and pastry chefs, Tahitian vanilla is known for its aromatic, fruity, cherry, anise-like flavor profile. Tahitian Pure Vanilla has a particular affinity to fruity flavors such as fruited yogurts, sorbets and fruit toppings.

Text from earthy.com

Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

An eighteen centure sickbed recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Modern custard recipes usually call for vanilla, but that wasn’t used in America in colonial times. Thomas Jefferson first brought vanilla beans back from France in the 1890s, and as Richard Sax noted in Classic Home Desserts, vanilla extract wasn’t widely available until the mid-19th century. Eighteenth-century custards were flavored with wine or brandy, tea, or spices. I added nutmeg to Simmons’s recipe since it seemed so bland — but I guess that was sort of the point.

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Mozzarella Sticks / Mozzarella Staver

A great Italian inspired snack recipe found on saveur.com
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Test kitchen director Farideh Sadeghin at Saveur likes to use Italian bread crumbs to bread her mozzarella, but you could use panko if you were so inclined. Double breading insures that the outside gets nice and crispy while the inside cheese has time to melt when frying. These freeze well, so keep them in your freezer and pull them out to defrost before frying whenever you feel like.

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The History of Pineapples

The History of Pineapples

It is not a pine nor an apple, and it is not native to Hawaii. However, since it was first canned and became a major crop there, we associate pineapple with Hawaii and the tastes of the islands. It has wonderful tenderizing enzymes and goes especially well with pork as well as, seafood, and sweet-and-sour dishes. Of course, there are always plenty of dessert recipes using pineapple.

Pineapple History

The History of PineapplesAnanas comosus is the botanical name of the fruit we know as the pineapple.

Native to South America, it was named for its resemblance to a pine cone. The term pineapple (or pinappel in Middle English) did not appear in English print until around 1664.

Christopher Columbus is credited with discovering the pineapple on the island of Guadeloupe in 1493, although the fruit had long been grown in South America. He called it piña de Indes meaning “pine of the Indians.”

The History of PineapplesSouth American Guarani Indians cultivated pineapples for food. They called it nanã, meaning “excellent fruit.”

Another explorer, Magellan, is credited with finding pineapples in Brazil in 1519, and by 1555, the luscious fruit was being exported with gusto to England. It soon spread to India, Asia, and the West Indies.

When George Washington tasted pineapple in 1751 in Barbados, he declared it his favorite tropical fruit. Although the pineapple thrived in Florida, it was still a rarity for most Americans.

Captain James Cook later introduced the pineapple to Hawaii circa 1770.

However, commercial cultivation did not begin until the 1880s when steamships made transporting the perishable fruit viable.

The History of Pineapples

In 1903, James Drummond Dole began canning pineapple, making it easily accessible worldwide. Production stepped up dramatically when a new machine automated the skinning and coring of the fruit.

The Dole Hawaiian Pineapple Company was a booming business by 1921, making pineapple Hawaii’s largest crop and industry.

Today, Hawaii produces only ten percent of the world’s pineapple crops. Other countries contributing to the pineapple industry include Mexico, Honduras, Dominican Republic, Philippines, Thailand, Costa Rica, China, and Asia.

The History of Pineapples

Pineapple is the third most canned fruit behind applesauce and peaches.

Text from thespruce.com

Pineapple Cake / Ananaskake

A kake recipe found in “Famous Southern Baking Recipes for Better Baking” published by Snow King in 1929
Pineapple Cake / Ananaskake

Recipe by Mrs. J. E Eubank Appling, Georgia (see picture). This reripe won first prize at a district contest held in Augusta, Ga.

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Spiced Hot Chocolate / Krydret Varm Sjokolade

A hot beverage recipe from the 17th century found on historyextra.comSpiced Hot Chocolate / Krydret Varm Sjokolade

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates spiced hot chocolate – a chocolate treat enjoyed by kings and queens.

Sam writes: Hot chocolate has always been one of my favourite drinks but I have often wondered when the drink was first consumed in Britain.

I was surprised to find out that chocolate itself arrived in England in the 1600s, with evidence of it being drunk at the court of Charles I – before it was deemed a sinful pleasure by Oliver Cromwell, and banned.

This recipe is based on the drink served at the English court during the 17th and 18th centuries and the spices make it smell – and taste – wonderful. It’s also very simple to make. The drink is very rich – you won’t need a big portion – but since chocolate was believed to have medicinal properties well into the mid-18th century, you can see it as a relatively guilt-free treat!

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Medieval Monday–Dried Apples / Tørkede Epler

A Medieval fruit preserving method found on cookit.e2bn.org 
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Dried apple rings were popular in the 16th century, as a way of storing fruit to last for the winter. Dried fruit could be soaked and used in puddings and sauces as needed.These keep very well and still make a nice healthy snack.
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