“The International Cook Book” by Alexander Filippini

“The International Cook Book” by Alexander Filippini

The International Cook Book

By
Alexander Filippini

published in 1911

Alexander Filippini

Alexander Filippini
Formerly of Delmonico’s, and Travelling Inspector of
the International Mercantile Marine Company.
Author of “The Table”

Over 3,300 Recipes gathered from all over the World, including
many never before published in English. With complete menus
of the three meals for every day in the year.

You can download this book in pdf format
by clicking the icon below

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Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

A delicious cake recipe found in “Mine Lekreste Kaker”
(My Sweetest Cakes) published by Teknisk Forlag in 1994

Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

Maybe not the most traditional of buns, at least not seen with Norwegian eyes, but who cares they look absolutely delicious.

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Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

A delicious snack recipe found in “Lær Mer om Sopp” (Learn More
About Mushrooms ) published by BAMA gruppen in 1982

Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

Edible mushrooms are the fleshy and edible fruit bodies of several species of macrofungi (fungi which bear fruiting structures that are large enough to be seen with the naked eye). They can appear either below ground (hypogeous) or above ground (epigeous) where they may be picked by hand. Edibility may be defined by criteria that include absence of poisonous effects on humans and desirable taste and aroma.

Edible mushrooms are consumed for their nutritional value and they are occasionally consumed for their supposed medicinal value. Mushrooms consumed by those practicing folk medicine are known as medicinal mushrooms. While hallucinogenic mushrooms (e.g. psilocybin mushrooms) are occasionally consumed for recreational or religious purposes, they can produce severe nausea and disorientation, and are therefore not commonly considered edible mushrooms.

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Russian Coffee Frappé / Russisk Kaffe Frappé

An ice coffee recipe found in “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925
Russian Coffee Frappé / Russisk Kaffe Frappé

Wikipedia: Frappé coffee (also Greek frappé or café frappé Greek: φραπές, frapés) is a Greek foam-covered iced coffee drink made from instant coffee (generally, spray-dried). Accidentally invented by a Nescafe representative named Dimitris Vakondios in 1957 in the city of Thessaloniki, it is now the most popular coffee among Greek youth and foreign tourists. It is popular in Greece, and Cyprus, especially during the summer, but has now spread to other countries. The word frappé is French and comes from the verb frapper which means to ‘strike’; in this context, however, in French, when describing a drink, the word frappé means chilled, as with ice cubes in a shaker. The frappé has become a hallmark of post-war outdoor Greek coffee culture.

Since this Russian recipe made with real brewed coffee is from 1925
I guess Mr Nescafe Representative must have simply pretended
to invent the frappé coffee after having stolen it from the Russians
in order to push his useless instant coffee

Ted
Winking smile

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Karin’s Soft Syrup Cookies / Karins Myke Sirupskaker

A classic Swedis cookie recipe found in  “Cappelens Kokebok”
(Cappelen’s Cook Book) published in 1995
Karin’s Soft Syrup Cookies / Karins Myke Sirupskaker

Ill_01_thumb[36]Karin was the Swedish artist Carl Larsson’s wife. The recipe is assigned to this cookbook by Karin’s and Carls’s grandson. Today, the syrup cookies are baked every Christmas in Larsson’s home Sundborn in Dalarna. The cakes should be quite tough. You keep the toughness by storing the cakes in plastic bags together with a piece of bread.

Potash (potassium carbonate) can be purchased at the pharmacies, but can be substituted with baking powder  or baking soda.

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Eat Like an Egyptian

An article by Stephanie Butler publised on
history.com october 2013
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Archeological discoveries have told us much about how ancient Egyptians worshiped, celebrated and mourned. But these scientific finds have also provided tantalizing clues about how–and what–this complex civilization ate. From grains like emmer and kamut to cloudy beer and honey-basted gazelle, this week’s Hungry History focuses on the meals of ancient Egypt.

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Bread and beer were the two staples of the Egyptian diet. Everyone from the highest priest to the lowliest laborer would eat these two foods every day, although the quality of the foods for the priest would undoubtedly be higher. The main grain cultivated in Egypt was emmer. Better known today as farro, emmer happens to be a fairly well balanced source of nutrition: it’s higher in minerals and fiber than similar grains. Breads and porridge were made from the grain, as well as a specially devised product that modern-day archeologists call “beer bread.”

Eat Like an Egyptian_02Beer bread was made from dough that used more yeast than normal breads, and it was baked at a temperature that didn’t kill off the yeast cultures. Brewers crumbled the bread into vats and let it ferment naturally in water. This yielded a thick and cloudy brew that would probably disgust our modern palates. But it was also nourishing and healthy, and filled in many nutritive deficiencies of the lower-class diet.

But ancient Egyptians did not survive on carbohydrates alone: Hunters could capture a variety of wild game, including hippos, gazelles, cranes as well as smaller species such as hedgehogs. Fish were caught, then salted and preserved; in fact fish curing was so important to Egyptians that only temple officials were allowed to do it. Honey was prized as a sweetener, as were dates, raisins and other dried fruits. Wild vegetables abounded, like celery, papyrus stalks and onions.

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Although no recipes from the times remain, we have a fair idea of how the Egyptians prepared their food thanks to dioramas and other objects left in tombs. Laborers ate two meals a day: a morning meal of bread, beer and often onions, and a more hearty dinner with boiled vegetables, meat and more bread and beer. Nobles ate well, with vegetables, meat and grains at every meal, plus wine and dairy products like butter and cheese. Priests and royalty ate even better. Tombs detail meals of honey-roasted wild gazelle, spit-roasted ducks, pomegranates and a berry-like fruit called jujubes with honey cakes for dessert. To top it all off, servant girls would circulate with jugs of wine to refill empty glasses: the perfect end to an Egyptian banquet.

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Medieval Monday – Almond Milk / Mandelmelk

A staple medieval recipe found on mediumaevum.tumblr.com
Medieval Monday - Almond Milk / Mandelmelk

Almond milk was a staple of the medieval kitchen. It was used in a wide variety of dishes as a substitute for milk or cream, especially on “fish days”, when the church placed restrictions on what foods could be eaten (the most prominent of which were the days during lent). Fortunately, almond milk is quick and easy to make.

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Hen Fricassé / Hønsefrikassé

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found in “Fjærkre”
(Poultry) published by the Hjemmet’s Kokebokklubb in 1882
Hen Fricassé / Hønsefrikassé

Thanks to the devoted efforts of a host in a consumer program on Norwegian television, we can finally get hens in the stores again here and I can finally make one of my childhood’s big dinner favorites, hen fricassé. To make the dish with chicken will never, ever be the same – Ted

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Teurdada Biase – Malaysian Family Omelet / Malaysisk Famileomelett

A spicy Asian omelet recipe found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise” (Asia – A Culinary Voyage) published by
Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987
Teurdada Biase – Malaysian Family Omelet / Malaysisk Famileomelett

This thin omelette with lots of spring onions and red and green chili is a popular little dish in the Malaysian cuisine and is often served with different main courses.

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DIY Sunday – English Punt

English Punt

As we all know, summer is right around the corner here on the Northern Hemisphere so what could be better to start up with in the workshop than building a classic English Punt. The perfect vessel for quiet rivers and shallow ponds. Plans in pdf can be downloaded by clicking the icon below

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Baked Cup Custard / Ovnsbakt Vaniljepudding

A dessert recipe found in “Borden’s Evaporated Milk Book
of Recipes” published by Borden’s Condenced Milk Company
in the 1930s

Baked Cup Custard / Ovnsbakt Vaniljepudding

A delicious baked dessert sweetened with sugar, maple syrup or honey.

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Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

A suffle recipe found in “10 Inspirerende Oppskrifter
med Jarlsberg” (10 Inspiring Recipes with Jarlsberg)
published by
 Tine
Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

Jarlsberg (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈjɑːɭsˈbærɡ]; English /ˈjɑːrlzbɜːrɡ/) is a mild cow’s-milk cheese with large regular holes, that originates from Jarlsberg, Norway. Although it originated in Norway, it is also produced in Ohio and Ireland under licenses from Norwegian dairy producers.

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Soda & Soft Drink – Sanpellegrino Aranciata

Soda & Soft Drink - Sanpellegrino Aranciata

Sanpellegrino AranciataHomemade, delicious and thirst-quenching aranciata is an all-Italian tradition. With this inspiration, Sanpellegrino has produced a genuine and authentic beverage since 1932: Sanpellegrino Aranciata, which is prepared with high-quality ingredients selected with care. Keeping the same inspiration, now Sanpellegrino offers a wide range of delicious citrus-based beverages.

1899
The Sanpellegrino Company is founded as a public company and is listed on the Milan Stock Exchange.1906

The magnificent Liberty-style Grand Hotel and Casino of San Pellegrino are inaugurated.

1908
S.Pellegrino sparkling mineral water’s distribution network is far reaching, stretching well beyond Europe.1924

Ezio Granelli, an Industrial chemist, becomes owner of Sanpellegrino. A true entrepreneur, Ezio Granelli soundly believed in innovation, research and development, and he willingly espoused the new concept of a natural and refreshing product like Aranciata.

1932
Ezio Granelli introduces Sanpellegrino Aranciata to the public at the Fiera Campionaria in Milan and become a huge success

1949
In celebration of the Company’s 50th birthday, Aranciata Amara – the bitter version of Aranciata – is launched.

1950
Limonata, Chinotto and other beverages, all part of the range of Sanpellegrino Sparkling Fruit Beverages, are introduced on the market as natural and refreshing beverages.

1976
The all-aluminium can version of the Sanpellegrino Sparkling Fruit Beverages is first introduced to the public.

2001
Aranciata Rossa – the blood orange version of Aranciata – appears on the shelf alongside the other Sanpellegrino Sparkling Fruit Beverages.

2013
Sanpellegrino Sparkling Fruit Beverages launch two new tasty products: Melograno e Arancia and Clementina.

2014
Two new mixed flavors of the Sanpellegrino Sparkling Fruit Beverages are presented: Limone e Menta and Ficodindia e Arancia.

Text from sanpellegrinofruitbeverages.com

Mushrooms in Tart Shells / Sopp i Terteskjell

A lunch recipe found in “Alt om Urter” (All About Herbs) published by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1885sopp i terteskjell_post_thumb[2]_thumb

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Caramel Pudding / Karamellpudding

A dessert recipe found in “Condenced Milk and
its use in Good Cookery” published by
Borden’s Condenced Milk Company in 1927

Caramel Pudding / Karamellpudding

A nifty way to make caramel pudding, but it takes two and a half hour. On the other hand there is hardly any work involved at all. Just checking the water level in the saucepan from time to time.

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