DIY Sunday – Build a Teardrop Camper

DIY Sunday - Build a Teardrop Camper

A streamlined home on wheels that’s light and easily towed; has a double-berth and complete kitchenette.

Getting away from it all doesn’t mean giving up the comforts of home, for with this compact camp trailer you bring them right along with you. As it’s only a fraction of the size and weight of a full-grown trailer, you can take this 10-ft. tourer wherever a car will go. And when you reach some ideal spot beside a lake or stream, up goes the hood over the kitchenette and in a matter of minutes there’s an appetizing meal cooking away on the pullout stove.

Let’s be honest, it lacks some of the comforts of a a modern camper, but who cares. This is retro camping at its best. Download the plans and set to work and you’ll have this nifty teardrop ready for the summer holiday. Hit the icon below and download these plans published in Mechanix Illustrated in September 1947 now.

pdf symbol

Advertisements

Cucumber (and Mint) Sandwiches / Agurk (og Mynte) Sandwich

An inter-war years sandwich recipe found on CookIt
Cucumber (and Mint) Sandwiches / Agurk (og Mynte) Sandwich

Cucumber sandwiches were often served as part of a formal afternoon tea. They had been very fashionable for the upper classes in the Edwardian era and had now become part of ordinary people’s afternoon tea.

Lyon’s Corner Houses were a popular place for people to go and have tea, scones and sandwiches. This recipe comes from a former employee of Lyons, Mrs Olive Bloomfield.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge british_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Scottish Heather Honey Sponge / Skotsk Lynghonningpudding

A traditional Scottish dessert recipe found on BBC Food
Scottish Heather Honey Sponge / Skotsk Lynghonningpudding

There’s nothing to compare to the light, fluffy texture of a steamed sponge pudding. Golden syrup is a classic addition, of course, but you will love this version, which makes the most of the fragrant flavour of Scottish heather honey. Any other well-flavoured honey will work well too.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge scottish_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday–Sun Drop

sun drop_01

Sun Drop, also marketed as Sundrop, is a citrus-flavored soda produced by Dr Pepper Snapple Group. It has a yellowish-green color imparted by Yellow 5. Among soft drinks, it is known for its high caffeine content (63 mg per 12 oz can, 9 mg higher than a 12 oz can of Mountain Dew, but not as much as Vault with 70.5 mg per 12 oz can). Orange juice is an ingredient in the drink, and remaining pulp matter from the orange juice provides some of the soft drink’s taste and appearance.

History

sun drop_02Sun Drop was developed in Missouri, by Charles Lazier, a salesman of beverage concentrates. While riding around town in the family car, Lazier quickly scribbled a recipe for a new soft drink on a small piece of paper which he handed to his son, Charles Jr. The younger Lazier worked as a lab technician at his father’s plant, and soon began work on the formula. Two years later, Sun Drop Cola debuted at the American Bottlers of Carbonated Beverages Conference in Washington, D.C. The Sun Drop formula was patented on April 15, 1930.

sun drop_04The drink was marketed in several Southern states under names such as “Sundrop Golden Cola” or “Golden Girl Cola.” The brand was acquired and standardized by Crush International in 1970. Crush International was purchased by Procter & Gamble in 1980, which sold its soft drinks holdings to Cadbury Schweppes plc in 1989. Cadbury Schweppes plc demerged in 2008, with its beverages unit becoming Dr Pepper Snapple Group, which currently produces Sun Drop.

Prior to the sale to Cadbury Schweppes, Procter & Gamble introduced several new Sun Drop flavors in 1985, including a reformulated Diet Sun Drop brand using aspartame instead of saccharin. A third brand, Cherry-Lemon Sun Drop, was introduced that same year. In February 2002, the brand introduced Caffeine-Free Sun Drop to the portfolio after the company received numerous requests from loyal consumers for a caffeine-free version of their favorite citrus soft drink. A diet variant of Cherry Lemon Sun Drop was introduced 2014.

sun drop_03

Sun Drop has maintained popularity in many parts of the southern United States, especially in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina and parts of the Midwest, including Wisconsin and western Minnesota. sun drop_05Similar to other regional drinks with a cult following, fans outside bottling areas have been known to pay large amounts to have the drink shipped to them. Families have sent it to U.S. soldiers serving in Afghanistan.

Sun Drop is the official drink of the nationally recognized “Fancy Farm Picnic” in Fancy Farm, Kentucky.

In the 1980s and early 1990s, the drink was promoted in the American South by NASCAR Winston Cup driver Dale Earnhardt.

Carolina Beverage Corp. bought Sun Drop Bottling Co. of Concord effective December 1, 2016. The Concord, North Carolina plant closed.

Text from Wikipedia

Country-Style Pancakes / Landsens Pannekaker

A farmhouse recipe found in “The Blue Bonnet Margarine Book
of Creative Cookery” published by Standard Brands in 1970

Country-Style Pancakes / Landsens Pannekaker

This doesn’t look much like what goes for pancakes in Scandinavia. On the other hand, they look quite like both “sveler” og “tjukklefse” and both are just as delicious as Scandinavian pancakes – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge american000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Oatmeal Bread / Havrebrød

A bread recipe found in “Borden’s Eagel Brand
Book of Recipes” published by Borden’s Condenced Milk Co
in the 1930s

Oatmeal Bread / Havrebrød

The people at Borden’s Condensed Milk Co obviously think we are all superbly accomplished bakers as they didn’t bother to mention neither oven temperature nor baking time in the recipe. I can’t say I feel all that sure about my accomplisment in the field of baking so I hope I’ll find help in similar recipes elsewhere on the net.

Ted
Winking smile

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_046000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

“Out of the strong came forth sweetness…” The Storty of Lyle’s Golden Syrup

Lyle's Golden Syrup_05

The story of golden syrup starts in 1881when the Scottish businessman Abram Lyle set up a sugar-refinery in London on the Thames with his five sons, processing sugar cane into sugar loaves. In those days, sugar was bought in large tapering mounds that had to be Lyle's Golden Syrup_07pounded or grated by hand at home. One byproduct of the process was a thick, gloopy syrup that with a little more refining through charcoal was very delicious. So he sold it to his workers from large barrels (Lyle was originally a cooper) and the syrup quickly was anointed with the nickname “Goldy”. Soon, Goldy became popular outside of his workforce and everyone wanted some. Just two years later, in 1883, Lyle’s Golden Syrup was born.

It is the tin the golden syrup that comes in that is the icon of both British cookery and Victorian entrepreneurship. Famously, on the front is a drawing of a dead lion peppered with swarming bees. Abram Lyle was a very pious man, and used the story of Samson in the book of Judges in Old Testament as the inspiration for the design. Quite a while before his fateful haircut, Samson got attacked by a lion which, through His power, Samson was able to rip open, killing it. Later he sees that bees have built a hive within its carcass and he takes some honey to his family and friends and they have a feast. He didn’t tell them about the lion and had them guess how he came about all the honey, presenting them with the poser:

And he said unto them, Out of the eater came forth meat, and out of the strong came forth sweetness. And they could not in three days expound the riddle.

Judges 14:14

Tins were first produced in 1884 and unbelievably have not changed at all in their design since. In fact, the recipe for the syrup has never changed either – making Lyle’s Golden Syrup the oldest brand in the world. “You’d be mad to mess with Lyle's Golden Syrup_06Goldie.” The only slight change is to the weights written on the tin: gone are the “1 lb” and “2 lb” marks, their replacement being the “454 g” and “907 g” marks, to keep in line with EU rulings. Another change occurred during the Second World War when, because of tin shortages, Lyle had to make the ‘tins’ from cardboard instead.

For over 125 years, it has been indispensable – it was even taken on Captain Scott’s fateful trek to the Antarctic. He wrote a letter to the Lyle family:

“Your Golden Syrup has been in daily use in this hut throughout the winter, and has been much appreciated by all members of the expedition.”

Lyle's Golden Syrup_03Lyle's Golden Syrup_04

In 1950, the Lyle Company brought out a second iconic product: Lyle’s Black Treacle. It is very similar to molasses, though it is considerably thicker and stronger tasting. For any recipes that ask for black treacle, you can substitute molasses instead with no problems.

Lyle's Golden Syrup_02

In the American classic The Fannie Farmer Cookbook, there is a recipe for Cornish Treacle Tart (which is actually made from Golden Syrup). In that recipe it asks for three-quarters of a cup of dark corn syrup. Do not on no account ever, ever, substitute golden syrup for corn syrup. The two are incomparable. So, I urge the American public: if you use a recipe that asks for Golden Syrup and you cannot get hold of any, don’t bother making it. Do you hear me? Good, then we understand each other. Amazon’s grocery section stocks it, so you can always get it online.

Lyle's Golden Syrup_01

Lyle’s Golden Syrup and Black Treacle are part of so many wonderful recipes, it would be crazy listing them all, but here are some of the most important or interesting ones.

Treacle tart
Flapjacks
Pancakes
Treacle sponge pudding
Mrs Beeton’s rolled treacle pudding
Golden syrup cake
Aunt Nelly’s pudding
Malt loaf
Jamaican ginger cake
Parkin
Ma Buttery’s crunch
Bonfire toffee
Christmas cake

Click the thumbnail below
to find a lot of these recies

Lyle thumb

Article found on britishfoodhistory.wordpress.com

Campfire Cooking – Blueberry Pizza / Blåbærpizza

A different and exciting pizza recipe found on
Dagbladet Mat
Campfire Cooking – Blueberry Pizza / Blåbærpizza

In the autumn blueberries can be enjoyed in many ways, and this pizza with blueberries, honey and blue cheese is an exciting variation that tastes amazingly good!

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge campfire000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

A 17th century pie recipe found on historyextra.com
Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates marlborough pie – a tasty pie that travelled to America in the 17th century.

Sam writes: English chef Robert May created this apple custard pie when compiling dishes for his 1660 recipe book The Accomplisht Cook.

As the English established colonies in the New World during the 17th century, settlers took the pie recipe with them. Since the 19th century it has become a favourite dessert in the US during holidays such as Thanksgiving.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Slow Roasted Greek Chicken with Crumbled Feta, Lemon and Olives / Langsomtstekt Gresk Kylling med Smuldret Feta, Sitron og Oliven

A recipe found in “The Dairy Kitchen Cookbook” a free E-book
published by Dairy Australia
Slow Roasted Greek Chicken with Crumbled Feta, Lemon and Olives / Langsomtstekt Gresk Kylling med Smuldret Feta, Sitron og Oliven

Greek cuisine is a Mediterranean cuisine. Contemporary Greek cookery makes wide use of vegetables, olive oil, grains, fish, wine, and meat (white and red, including lamb, poultry, rabbit and pork). Other important ingredients include olives, cheese, eggplant (aubergine), zucchini (courgette), lemon juice, vegetables, herbs, bread and yoghurt. The most commonly used grain is wheat; barley is also used. Common dessert ingredients include nuts, honey, fruits, and filo pastry.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge ethnic speciality_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Oriental Turkey Soup / Orientalsk Kalkunsuppe

An Asian inspired soup recipe found on
“The Quick & Eary  Armour Cookbook” published by 
the Benjamin Company in 1980

Oriental Turkey Soup / Orientalsk Kalkunsuppe

I can’t help spotting gherkins on the picture even though it is not mentioned in the recipe so the choice is yours, trust the picture or the recipe. In my opinion you can never go wrong with gherkins, I simply love the stuff

Ted
Winking smile

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge soup_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

An ice cream recipe found in “Condenced Milk and its use
in Good Cookery” published by  Borden’s Condenced Milk
Company in 1927

Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge dessert_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Cinnamon Coffee Cake / Kaffekake med Kanel

A cake recipe found in “A Sampler of Modern Sour Cream
Recipes” published by American Dairy Association in 1970

Cinnamon Coffee Cake / Kaffekake med Kanel

Cinnamon (/ˈsɪnəmən/ sin-ə-mən) is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used in both sweet and savoury foods. The term “cinnamon” also refers to its mid-brown colour.

Cinnamomum verum is sometimes considered to be “true cinnamon“, but most cinnamon in international commerce is derived from related species, also referred to as “cassia” to distinguish them from “true cinnamon”.

Cinnamon is the name for perhaps a dozen species of trees and the commercial spice products that some of them produce. All are members of the genus Cinnamomum in the family Lauraceae. Only a few Cinnamomum species are grown commercially for spice.

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_160000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

“The International Cook Book” by Alexander Filippini

“The International Cook Book” by Alexander Filippini

The International Cook Book

By
Alexander Filippini

published in 1911

Alexander Filippini

Alexander Filippini
Formerly of Delmonico’s, and Travelling Inspector of
the International Mercantile Marine Company.
Author of “The Table”

Over 3,300 Recipes gathered from all over the World, including
many never before published in English. With complete menus
of the three meals for every day in the year.

You can download this book in pdf format
by clicking the icon below

pdf symbol

Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

A delicious cake recipe found in “Mine Lekreste Kaker”
(My Sweetest Cakes) published by Teknisk Forlag in 1994

Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

Maybe not the most traditional of buns, at least not seen with Norwegian eyes, but who cares they look absolutely delicious.

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_077000_norway_recipe_marker_ny