Mrs De Graf’s Cook Book from 1922 in PDF

Mrs De Graf’s Cook Book from 1922 in PDF

Mrs De Graf’s Cook Book

Published by
H S Crocker Co Inc
San Francisco, California
in 1922

Belle de Graf

To the many whose requests that the works of the author
be put into book form, and whose interest was the main
influence that prompted the publication of this book, a deep
feeling of thanks is extended.

To the San Francisco Chronicle and the H. S. Crocker Co., Inc.,
whose cooperation made possible the printing and distribution
of this book, sincere appreciation is offered.

Belle de Graf - signature


Mrs Belle De Graf’s cook book from 1922 can
be yours in pdf format simply by clicking
the icon below

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Traditional Norwegian Stewed Fish / Plukkfisk

A traditional Norwegian dish found on matprat.no
Traditional Norwegian Stewed Fish / Plukkfisk

Traditional food with an asumed origin from Western Norway. These days, this dish is eaten all over the country, and every “stewed fish family” have their own recipe. Some people use plain cod or stock fish instead of lightly salted cod. Some families may swear to pollock, but there is one thing they all have in common. A really tasty meal.

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Wholemeal Frankfurter Crescents / Grove Pølsehorn

A snack recipe just as perfect for picnics as for
children’s parties found on
 brodogkorn.no
Wholemeal Frankfurter Crescents / Grove Pølsehorn

These frankfurter crescents are delicious and very easy to make! Great for a hike or picknic warmed over a fire or on a charcoal grill, or as a finger food at a children’s party.

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History in a Jar -The Story of Pickles

An article by Tori Avey published on The History Kitchen in 2014

tigriscleopatraIt is rumored that they were one of Cleopatra’s prized beauty secrets. They make apperances in the Bible and in Shakespeare’s writing. Pregnant women have been known to crave them along with ice cream. Pickles have been around for thousands of years, dating as far back as 2030 BC when cucumbers from their native India were pickled in the Tigris Valley. The word “pickle” comes from the Dutch pekel or northern German pókel, meaning “salt” or Shakespeare“brine,” two very important components in the pickling process. Throughout history pickling was a necessity, as it was the best way to preserve food for a long period of time. As one of the earliest mobile foods, pickles filled the stomachs of hungry sailors and travelers, while also providing families with a source of food during the cold winter months.

Pickles are created by immersing fresh fruits or vegetables in an acidic liquid or saltwater brine until they are no longer considered raw or vulnerable to spoilage. When we think of pickles, cucumbers commonly come to mind. Pickled cucumbers are often lacto-fermented in saltwater brine. During this process lactic microbial organisms develop, which turn the naturally occurring sugars of foods into lactic acid. In turn, the environment becomes acidic quickly, making it impossible for any spoiling bacteria to multiply. Cucumber pickles can also be made with a salt and vinegar brine, a popular choice for home cooks. The brine, known as “pickle juice,” is sometimes used by athletes to treat dehydration, though it has yet to be proven as a true remedy.

pickles

Kosher dills have a unique history of their own. In The Book of Jewish Food, Claudia Roden explains that pickled vegetables were a dietary staple for Jews living in the Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Russia. The sharp flavor of pickles proved a welcome addition to the bland bread-and-potato diet of these cold weather countries. For several generations, it was an autumn custom for Ashkenazim to fill barrels with cucumbers, beets and shredded cabbage. The mixture was left to ferment in a warm place for several weeks, then relocated to cool, dark cellars. The pickles would last through the long cold winter until spring, when new crops of fresh produce were available.

New York 1900When a heavy influx of eastern European Jews arrived in New York City during the late 1800s and early 1900s, immigrants introduced kosher dill pickles to America. Cucumbers were washed, then piled in large wooden barrels along with dill, garlic, spices, kosher salt and clean water. They were left to ferment for a few weeks to several months; shorter fermenting time produced brighter green “half sours,” while longer fermentation resulted in “full sours.” Pickles were sold on pushcarts in the immigrant tenement district of New York City. Over time, Jewish-owned shops selling pickles straight out of the barrel began appearing in droves. Eventually, pickling became a profitable business within the Jewish community. Today, a plate of pickles is usually served complimentary with a meal at the best Jewish delis.

masonHome pickling was made much easier and more sanitary during the 1850s, when two essential canning tools were invented. First, a Scottish chemist by the name of James Young created paraffin wax, which helped to create a seal for food preserved in jars. A few years later, John Mason developed and patented the first Mason jar. Mason’s jars were made from a heavyweight glass that was able to tolerate the high temperatures used in canning and processing pickles.

Of course, pickles aren’t limited to the dill and cucumber variety. They can be sweet, sour, salty, hot or all of the above. Pickles can be made with cauliflower, radishes, onions, green beans, asparagus and a seemingly endless variety of other vegetables and fruits. When the English arrived in the New World, they brought their method for creating sweet pickles with vinegar, sugar and spiced syrup. Eastern Europeans introduced various forms of lacto-fermented cabbage, known as sauerkraut. The French serve tiny, spiced cornichons with heavy pâtés and pungent cheeses. In the Middle East pickles are served with every meal, from peppers to olives to lemons. Russians pickle tomatoes, among other things. Koreans have their kimchi, the Japanese pickle plums and daikon, and Italians pickle eggplants and peppers. Each area of the world has its own beloved variety of pickle.

Peanut Butter Cookies / Peanøttsmørkaker

A cookie recipe found in “Cooky Jar Favourites”
published by the Tested Recipe Institute in 1960

Peanut Butter Cookies / Peanøttsmørkaker

Peanut butter, raisins and oats should give these cookies the perfect
chewiness. Just the thing with a glass of lemonade for the children of the Norwegian post-war baby boom which I was a part back in 1960
when this book was published. Little Ted was 7 back then.

Winking smile

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Pabst-ett Frozen Peach Custard / Pabst-ett Frossen Ferskenpudding

A dessert recipe found in “Recipes the Modern Pabst-ett Way”
published by the Pabst Corporation in 1931

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Pabst-ett was a cheese prodused by Pabst brewery during Prohibition. Many breweries turned to alternative pruducts back then.  After Prohibition ended in 1933, Pabst sold the cheese business off to Kraft who continued to produce Pabst-ett cheese until at least the late 1940’s. If you want to try your hand at this recipe, use any cheese to your taste you think might go well with the rest of the recipe ingredients.

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Medieval Monday – Brawune Fryes

A 15th century pork recipe found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday - Brawune Fryes

saara_thumb11_thumbSaara who runs Let Hem Boyle writes on the blog: This blog is all about historical cooking, mainly focusing on the medieval and renaissance periods. I hope you’ll get inspired and see that cooking is fun and easy. The modernized recipes are only my suggestions, so feel free to try out and make your own! This blog and material is in English and in Finnish. Check out the upper bar of this page! You can find all the recipes there 🙂 enjoy!

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Bacon Steaks / Baconbiffer

A quick dinner recipe found in “52 Søndagsmiddager”
(52 Sunday Dinners) utgitt av Hjemmets Kokebokklubb i 1983
Bacon Steaks / Baconbiffer

I hope you don’t get too disappointed when you find out that these
steakes are made of minced beef. Norwegians have a tendency to call
large thick patties for steaks. My apologies visitors

Ted
Winking smile

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Islander Treat Salad / Karibisk Salattraktering

A salad recipe found in “Swappin’ Good Recipes Feat. Cottage Cheese” published by American Dairy Association in 1970Islander Treat Salad / Karibisk Salattraktering

Unless you were stinking rich I guess this was a salad you might have served rather seldom. Four servings of salad made from 8 freshly cooked lobster tail served with fresh pineapple was not cheap ingredients back in 1970, neither are they today.
But man, it looks absolutely delicious.

Ted
Winking smile

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DIY Sunday – Folding Porch Chairs

DIY Sunday - Folding Porch Chairs

A set of plans for a couple of really nice retro porch chairs for you here. The plans were published in the May 1952 issue of Popular Mechanics
and you can download them in pdf format by clicking the icon below

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Homemade Cajun Tortilla Chips / Hjemmelagede Cajun Tortillachips

A spicy snack recipe found on BBC Good Food
Homemade Cajun Tortilla Chips / Hjemmelagede Cajun Tortillachips

Oven bake flour tortilla into crunchy chips flavoured with traditional Louisiana spices and serve with dip.

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Classic Norwegian Griddle Cakes / Klassiske Lapper

A classic Norwegian griddle cake recipe found on godt.noClassic Norwegian Griddle Cakes / Klassiske Lapper

These griddle cakes are always popular and very quick to make. This recipe also contains little fat, which makes the the cakes suitable as everyday food.

Serve the cakes with homemade jams. And if you want to make the kids extra eager, you can sprinkle chopped chocolate on the cakes while they cook, nothing beats chocolate griddle cakes!

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Ski

Ski is a citrus soda made from real orange and lemon juices, manufactured by the Double Cola Company.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Ski

History

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - SkiCombining the powerful tastes of oranges and lemons, Double Cola Company’s citrus drink, Ski, was formulated in 1956. The soda contains natural flavorings to create a soft drink with a strong, natural citrus taste. Ski was trademarked in 1958.

Diet Ski was introduced in 1986 to enhance the sales of regular Ski.

Ten years later, in 1996, Cherry Ski was introduced giving Ski drinkers an even greater citrus drink choice.

In 2009, Ski underwent a package redesign. A new slogan was introduced, “Real Lemon. Real Orange. Real Good.” Along with the new graphics, Diet Ski was reformulated with Splenda. Cherry Ski was re-branded as Ski InfraRED.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Ski

Pork, Plum And Sage Pasties / Svinekjøtt, Plomme og Salvie Paier

A great picnic recipe found on TescoRealFood
Pork, Plum And Sage Pasties / Svinekjøtt, Plomme og Salvie Paier

The time for picnics is really back again here in Norway, this week has almost been to hot for comfort. That means it’s time to make fresh lemonade, bake pastries, make sandwiches and get the picnic baskets out of the cupboards and head for a nice park or the woods. Marvelous way to share a meal if you ask me – Ted

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English Casserole / Engelsk Gryte

A quick dinner recipe found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for
Busy People)
published Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

English Casserole / Engelsk Gryte

I’m not quite sure why the authors of the book has chosen to call this dish English Casserole, it could just as easily has been from any of the Scandinavian countries. Not that this matter much, recipes have traveled to and fro over the North Sea for more than a 1000 years so who care where it came from initially, it looks delicious – Ted

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