Go Outdoor’s 2017 Camping Cook Book in PDF

Go Outdoor’s 2017 Camping Cook Book in PDF

From the book intro

Here at GO Outdoors we’re excited to introduce you to
our second camping cookbook!

After the great response we received about the first one, we couldn’t wait to get started on a new, healthy and diet-friendly edition.

If you’re a vegetarian, a vegan, a pescatarian or you only eat gluten-free foods, you’ve no need to fear! Our selection of easy-to-cook camping recipes has come from the top camping blogger and they have plenty of experience cooking to different specifications in the great outdoors! In fact, these recipes are so delicious, you’ll want to make them at home, never mind just by the campfire.

Explore snacks, breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes and you’ll realise we’ve got all of your tastes covered right here!


Here’s another of those great free camping cookbooks
from
Go Outdoors. You can download it here simply
by clicking the icon below

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Varm Brie with Bacon / Varm Brie med Bacon

A delicious snack/lunch recipe found on gilde.noVarm Brie with Bacon / Varm Brie med Bacon

Baked brie wrapped in bacon, roasted hazlenuts, fried apple wedges,
thyme and honey sounds like a mix made in heaven if you as me – Ted

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The World’s Easiest Ice Coffee / Verdens Nemmeste Iskaffe

A simple recipe for ice coffee found on madogbolig.dk
The World’s Easiest Ice Coffee / Verdens Nemmeste Iskaffe

Here’s a brilliant recipe for the world’s easiest ice coffee with condensed milk.

There is hardly an easier way to make a delicious ice coffee than with condensed milk. The milk gives a nice creamy flavor – like in the types of ice coffee that you buy from Starbucks or Baresso. At the same time, the condensed milk sweetens the coffee nicely and you can choose how sweet you want to make your ice coffee.

Once you’ve found the blend that agrees perfectly with your taste buds, you can make yourself a delicious ice coffee with condensed milk,  at a fraction of what you usually would have to pay at the cafes.

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Cauliflower Soup with Trout and Dill / Blomkålsuppe med Ørret og Dill

A delicate and filling soup recipe found on kiwi.no
Cauliflower Soup with Trout and Dill / Blomkålsuppe med Ørret og Dill

Let the fish simmer for a few minutes in the saucepan before serving the soup garnished with dill and lemon wedges.

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Cheat’s Knickerbockers / Juksemakerens Knickerbocker

A simple take on the classic Knickerbocker
found on
BBC good food

Cheat’s Knickerbockers / Juksemakerens Knickerbocker

Why compromise on dessert, this low-fat pudding has all the taste
of a traditional knockerbocker glory.

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Breakfast Sandwich with Fried Egg / Frokostsmørbrød med Speilegg

A delicious breakfast idea found on meny.no
Breakfast Sandwich with Fried Egg / Frokostsmørbrød med Speilegg

This is a sandwich perfect for a full breakfast! Buy half-baked bread and make a sandwich of fresh bread with aioli, Provence ham, finely chopped spring onions, cherry tomatoes and toped it all with a fried egg for each. Simple and fast breakfast, but very good.

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Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome’s ‘Ketchup’ Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredient

An article by Olga Oksman posted on theguardian.com
Wednesday 26 August 2015

Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome's 'Ketchup' Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredient

Garum and other similar fish-based sauces were the ketchup of the ancient world, mass produced in factories by the Romans, and sprinkled on anything savory. They usually made several versions: a dark-colored table condiment that was high in protein, a cooking sauce similar to Thai and Vietnamese fish sauces (sometimes called liquamen by historians, though often grouped together with garum), and a milder version called muria, explains food historian Sally Grainger. The fall of the Roman empire meant the end of its mass production, but the art of the fish sauce was not lost in Italy. The modern-day version, colatura di alici, is a saltier mixture of all three sauces.

Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome's 'Ketchup' Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredient

While Italy may not be the first place that comes to mind when thinking of fish sauce, several companies on the Amalfi coast continue the ancient traditions. Today’s colatura is a clear, amber liquid made from Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome's 'Ketchup' Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredientfermented, salted anchovies and sold in tiny, elegant glass bottles. It is often described as the great-grandfather of Worcestershire sauce. “There is only a difference of a few ingredients, but colatura tastes better,” Grace Singleton, managing partner at Zingerman’s Delicatessen, tells me.

Zingerman’s, based in Michigan, started carrying the condiment around 15 years ago, when co-founding partner Ari Weinzweig found himself in the Amalfi coast town of Cetara, where it has been made for generations. After tasting it for the first time, Weinzweig knew he had to carry it in his store. It took a year to get all the labelling right for US importation, but it was worth it. Since then, the sauce has had a steady following, Weinzweig tells me.

Everyone who has tried it remembers the exact moment when colatura di alici and taste buds first met. For Matt Armendariz, who runs the food blog Matt Bites, it was in Italy, in an aioli sauce. “My mind was blown. It had this umami flavor and I asked the chef why it was so delicious, and he said he used colatura di alici. I just fell in love with it,” Armendariz fondly recalls.

Garum jugs from PompeiiThe amber sauce, which is fermented traditionally in chestnut barrels, is an inexpensive way to add depth and flavor to dishes, says Singleton. A little glass bottle will set you back on average $15, but you only need a sprinkling to bring a new dimension to food.

It is also the key to a quick and simple pasta dish popular in the Amalfi coast. Any kind of long, thin pasta is mixed with garlic, chili-infused olive oil and a little colatura di alici for an unmistakable savory rich flavor that belies its simple ingredients. Armendariz recommends sprinkling it on ripe tomatoes or putting a few drops on grilled steaks and other meats to make the flavor pop. Singleton favors using it in place of salt in dishes, since it does double duty by both salting a dish and accentuating its flavors.

Despite its fishy origins, don’t think of it as a fish sauce, says Armendariz, who refers to the flavor enhancer as a “genie in a bottle” on his blog. It’s a true secret ingredient for the modern age, taken straight out of the ancient world.


In context

Roman Garum was a fermented fish sauce used as a condiment in the cuisines of ancient Greece, Rome, and Byzantium. Liquamen was a similar preparation, and at times the two were synonymous. Although it enjoyed its greatest popularity in the Roman world, the sauce was earlier used by the Greeks.

When mixed with wine (oenogarum, a popular Byzantine sauce), vinegar, black pepper, or oil, garum enhances the flavor of a wide variety of dishes, including boiled veal and steamed mussels, even pear-and-honey soufflé. Diluted with water (hydrogarum) it was distributed to Roman legions. Pliny (d. 79) remarked in his Natural History that it could be diluted to the colour of honey wine and drunk.

You might have noticed that Liquamen was listed among the
ingredients on my Medieval Monday post a few days ago.
You can find old recipes for Garum here

http://www.coquinaria.nl/english/recipes/garum.htm

and here

http://www.pompeii-food-and-drink.org/garum.htm

Ted

Successful Canning and Preserving from 1917 in PDF

Successful Canning and Preserving from 1917 in PDF

Successfull Canning
and Preserving
by Ola Powell

a book in the
Lippincott’s Home Manuales
series

Published by
J B Lippincot Co
in 1917


This book on classic canning and preserving counting more than
400 page  can be yours simply by clicking the icon below

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Norwegian Wheat Biscuits / Hvetekjeks

A classic Norwegian  biscuit recipe  found in “Den Store Bakeboken” (The Big Baking Book) published Schibstedt in 1978Norwegian Wheat Biscuits / Hvetekjeks

Biscuits, whether made with rye, oats or wheat, are very popular
in Norway. Any biscuit with good butter and Norwegian goat cheese
will bring good childhood memories for most of us. At least for me

Ted
Winking smile

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Onion Goulash / Løkgulasj

A dinner recipe with origins in Hungary found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for Busy People) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982
Onion Goulash / Løkgulasj

Goulash (Hungarian: gulyás [ˈɡujaːʃ]) is a soup or stew of meat and vegetables, seasoned with paprika and other spices. Originating from the medieval Kingdom of Hungary, goulash is also a popular meal in Central Europe, Eastern Europe, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Scandinavia and Southern Europe.

Its origin traces back to the 9th century to stews eaten by Hungarian shepherds. Back then, the cooked and flavored meat was dried with the help of the sun and packed into bags produced from sheep’s stomachs, needing only water to make it into a meal. It is one of the national dishes of Hungary and a symbol of the country.

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Warming Ginger Soda / Heit Ingefærdrikk

A classic summer drink perfect for picnics or outdoor
evening parties found on
goodhousekeeping.co.uk
Warming Ginger Soda / Heit Ingefærdrikk

A delicious old-fashioned drink, perfect to sip at a picnic
or on a summer evening party.

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French Chocolate / Fransk Sjokolade

A classic hot beverage recipe found in “Baker’s Favourite Chocolate Recipes” published by Baker’s Chocolate in 1936French Chocolate / Fransk Sjokolade

French Chocolate is a hot chocolate, de luxe. It is especially suitable for entertaining when the serving is done by the hostess, and makes an effective, gracious ceremony of afternoon refreshments

Accompaniments for this delicious beverage should be light and  dainty. Thin bread and butter sandwiches, unsweetened wafers, or sponge drops are excellent to serve.

Let this rich, satisfying French Chocolate do the honors at your next party – a bridge luncheon, afternoon, evening, or after-theatre party.

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Alliance Jam / Alliansesyltetøy

A fancy jam recipe found on frukt.no
Alliance Jam / Alliansesyltetøy

Making jams from different varieties of berries together is always a success. Try the mix you like the best. In this jam we used red currant, raspberry and black currant.

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Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

A medieval Roman recipe found on CookIt!
Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

This recipe illustrates the Roman love of dishes that could be dipped into sauces. A vast array dishes could be served in bowls and platters. Meat would be carved into small pieces, so that each guest only picks what he needs and dips the meat into the accompanying sauces served in little bowls.

The meat would be cooked over a raised brick hearth, on top of which was a charcoal fire. The meat was placed in a pan on a tripod placed over the fire or cooked directly on a grid. Also used were frying pans (pensa), deeper pans (patella and patina), mixing bowls (mortaria) with a spout for pouring.

The recipe given here is not meant to be cooked in a modern kitchen but on an open fire or on a charcoal grill. Roman cooks judged quantities by eye so measurements are not given. Apicius provides the ingredients for the sauce, this then accompanies pan- fried meat.

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The Plum Tart from “The Light Years” / Plummeterten fra "The Light Years"

A baking recipe inspired by literature found on theguardian.com
The Plum Tart from “The Light Years” / Plummeterten fra "The Light Years"

They all had dinner – fourteen of them round the immense three-pedestal table extended to its uttermost and even then they were crammed round it. They ate four roast chickens, bread sauce, mashed potato and runner beans followed by plum tart and what the Duchy called Shape – blancmange.

From “The Light Years” by Elizabeth Jane Howard

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