Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

A 17th century pie recipe found on historyextra.com
Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates marlborough pie – a tasty pie that travelled to America in the 17th century.

Sam writes: English chef Robert May created this apple custard pie when compiling dishes for his 1660 recipe book The Accomplisht Cook.

As the English established colonies in the New World during the 17th century, settlers took the pie recipe with them. Since the 19th century it has become a favourite dessert in the US during holidays such as Thanksgiving.

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Spiced Hot Chocolate / Krydret Varm Sjokolade

A hot beverage recipe from the 17th century found on historyextra.comSpiced Hot Chocolate / Krydret Varm Sjokolade

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates spiced hot chocolate – a chocolate treat enjoyed by kings and queens.

Sam writes: Hot chocolate has always been one of my favourite drinks but I have often wondered when the drink was first consumed in Britain.

I was surprised to find out that chocolate itself arrived in England in the 1600s, with evidence of it being drunk at the court of Charles I – before it was deemed a sinful pleasure by Oliver Cromwell, and banned.

This recipe is based on the drink served at the English court during the 17th and 18th centuries and the spices make it smell – and taste – wonderful. It’s also very simple to make. The drink is very rich – you won’t need a big portion – but since chocolate was believed to have medicinal properties well into the mid-18th century, you can see it as a relatively guilt-free treat!

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Apple Pandowdy / Eple Pandowdy

A 17th Century dessert recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Apple Pandowdy / Eple Pandowdy

The girl who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: According to John Mariani in “The Dictionary of American Food and Drink”, pandowdy was first mentioned in print in 1805. The dessert turned up decades later in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Blithedale Romance” (1852):

“Hollingsworth [would] fill my plate from the great dish of
pan-dowdy.”

In the meantime, it was supposedly a favorite of Abigail and John Adams, although a recipe I saw attributed to Abigail has a pastry-dough crust, not a biscuit topping. Which is a true pandowdy? I don’t think anyone really knows for sure.

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Martha Washington’s “Excellent Cherry Bounce” / Martha Washingtons "Utmerkede Kirsebær Bounce"

A historic cherry liqueur recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Cherry Bounce_post

The girl who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Bounce is made from sour cherries, sugar, and liquor such as brandy, rum, or whiskey. Martha’s recipe, which was found in her papers although not in her handwriting, called for brandy. This drink was one of George’s favorites. He even took it along on journeys — on a trip west in 1784, in search of a commercial waterway from the Atlantic to the Mississippi Valley, he packed canteens of Madeira, port, and bounce.

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Jane Austen’s Black Butter Jam / Jane Austens Smørbare Syltetøy

A simple but delicious jam recipe found on Bite From The Past
Jane Austens Black Butter Jam_post

The Girl who runs Bite From The Past writes: I have been dying to make this ever since I spotted it in The Jane Austen Cookbook by Maggie Black and Deirdre LeFaye.

This is the easiest jam you’ll ever make in your life-and it makes good use of leftover pieces of fruit. It’s funny to me that the instructions state this is a jam for children-probably because it’s a mixed up combination of fruit. I think it’s a wonderful addition to any biscuit or bread at tea time.

In this batch, I used strawberries, two apples that were starting to shrivel, and a couple of really ripe pears. Peel the skins off the apples and pears. You can also use peaches or plums-just be sure to blanche them first to remove the skin.

I did not can these – although you can to preserve them longer. I merely put mine in canning jars and set them in the very back of my refrigerator, where they lasted for several months!

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1700s Mushroom Ketchup / 1700talls Soppketchup

An exiting recipe found onWorld Turn’d Upside Down
a blog you would not want to miss if you are at
all interested in historic recipes

1700s Mushroom Ketchup_post

Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down‘ writes: Mushroom ketchup was something I’ve been wanting to make for a long time. I love the fact that this was a common sauce so different from the ketchup we use today. In the early 1700s, ketchup was introduced to English explorers by the people of Singapore and Malaysia. Originally a sauce for fish, ketchup was made out of walnuts, oysters or mushrooms and was similar to soy sauce. The English expanded the use of the sauce and it became popular for fish and meat dishes.

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Bath Buns / Bath Boller

A 17th century bun recipe found on telegraph.co.uk
bath buns_telegraph_post

Rich Bath buns with a sweet sugar glaze were a favourite of Jane Austen – though apparently it was easy to over-do it.

From a recipe from Mrs Raffald’s “The Experienced English Housekeeper” published in 1769. Mrs Raffald tells us to “send them in hot for breakfast”, which sounds rather indigestible for these rich, buttery buns, and may have been why, when Jane was staying with a rather mean aunt, she joked to Cassandra that she would make herself an inexpensive guest by “disordering my stomach with Bath buns”.

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Old-Fashioned Gingersnaps / Gammeldagse Ingefærkjeks

An old spicy cookie recipe found on bhg.com
Old-Fashioned Gingersnaps_post

Gingersnaps, also called ginger biscuits, are a type of cookie. The name comes from the fact these cookies traditionally are very crispy and make a snapping sound when eaten. Gingersnaps are a derivation of gingerbread and were invented hundreds of years ago. People in colonial times enjoyed these cookies, both in European countries and in America.

Origins

Ginger is derived from the ginger root and is native to parts of South Asia; historians believe it was first cultivated in India. Ginger was prized for its valuable effects on health and imported for its medicinal uses before it was utilized for cooking purposes. Ginger found its way to ancient Rome, then to Africa and the Caribbean. In medieval times, ginger was imported to Europe in preserved form to be used in baking treats such as cakes and cookies.

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Jane Austen’s Flummery

A dessert recipe inspired by Jane Austen’s novels
found in historyextra.com
Jane Austen recipes _Dinner with Mr Darcy - Flummery_post

Whether it’s breakfast at Northanger Abbey, tea and cake at Mansfield Park, or one of Mrs Bennet’s dinners to impress, food is an important theme in Jane Austen’s novels. And now, Austen fans can recreate the dishes featured in the author’s works, thanks to new book “Dinner with Mr Darcy” by Pen Vogler

Flummery is a white jelly, which was set in elegant molds or as shapes in clear jelly. Its delicate, creamy taste goes particularly well with rhubarb, strawberries, and raspberries. A modern version would be to add the puréed fruit to the ingredients, taking away the same volume of water.

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1796 Honey Cake / 1796 Honning Kake

A more than 200 years old recipe found on savoringthepast.net
a must for anyone interested in historic food
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This honey cake recipe is from Amelia Simmons’ 1796 cookbook, “American Cookery”. It is probably what we would think of as gingerbread today.

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Colonial Hot Buttered Rum / Varm Rom Med Smør fra Kolonitiden

A classic hot beverage found on allrecipes.comColonial Hot Buttered Rum_post

This is the real thing – an authentic Colonial recipe except.. You will swear you are drinking a cinnamon roll, and then it hits you! Very tasty and a family favorite (Among the grown-ups that is 😉 ).

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Martha Washington’s Great Cake / Martha Washingtons Store Kake

A cake recipe from George Washington’s Virginia home
found on
Revolutionarypie.com
Martha Washington’s Great Cake_post

Karen HammondsKaren Hammonds who runs revolutionarpie writes: When I read about Martha Washington’s Great Cake, I wondered whether it was called that because it was really good or really large. I think the name was meant to describe its size — to give you an idea of just how big it was, here is Martha’s recipe:

Take 40 eggs and divide the whites from the yolks and beat them to a froth. Then work 4 pounds of butter to a cream and put the whites of eggs to it a Spoon full at a time till it is well work’d. Then put 4 pounds of sugar finely powdered to it in the same manner then put in the Yolks of eggs and 5 pounds of flour and 5 pounds of fruit. 2 hours will bake it. Add to it half an ounce of mace and nutmeg half a pint of wine and some fresh brandy.

Martha Washington’This cake was prepared at Mount Vernon, the Washingtons’ Virginia home, during the Christmas season and for other special occasions. I’ve seen references to Martha baking it herself, but according to the book Dining with the Washingtons, cooking was ordinarily done by servants. Martha did supervise meal planning and the kitchen closely, however, and Washington family lore had it that she made some dishes herself. I like to think she baked George a cake once in a while.

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