Tomato and Endive Salad / Tomat og Endivesalat

A recipe from “The Salad Bowl” published by BestFood in 1929
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Strawberry Fluff / Jordbær Dun

A dessert recipe found in “A Cook’s Tour with Minute Tapioca”
published by Minute Tapioca Co in 1929

Strawberry Fluff / Jordbær Dun

Tapioca (/ˌtæpɪˈoʊkə/; Portuguese pronunciation: [tapiˈɔkɐ]) is a starch extracted from cassava root (Manihot esculenta). This species is native to the northeast region of Brazil, but its use spread throughout South America. The plant was carried by Portuguese and Spanish explorers to most of the West Indies and Africa and Asia. It is a tropical, perennial shrub that is less commonly cultivated in temperate climate zones. Cassava thrives better in poor soils than many other food plants.

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Picnic Caramel Cake / Piknik Karamellkake

A baking recipe found in “Igleheart’s Cake Secrets”
published in 1928Picnic Caramel Cake / Piknik Karamellkake

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This is my post No 2.500 on this blogg!

thanks

Coconut Butterscotch Pie / Kokos- og Smørkaramellpai

A pie recipe from “Cocnut – Sun-Sweetness From The Tropics”
published by Franklin Baker Company in 1928

Coconut Butterscotch Pie / Kokos- og Smørkaramellpai

Butterscotch is a type of confectionery whose primary ingredients are brown sugar and butter, although other ingredients are part of some recipes, such as corn syrup, cream, vanilla, and salt. The earliest known recipes in the middle 19th century used treacle (molasses) in place of or in addition to sugar.

Butterscotch is similar to toffee, but for butterscotch the sugar is boiled to the soft crack stage, and not hard crack as with toffee. Butterscotch sauce, made of butterscotch and cream, is used as a topping for ice cream (particularly sundaes).

The term butterscotch is also often used more specifically of the flavour of brown sugar and butter together, even where the actual confection butterscotch is not involved, such as in butterscotch pudding.

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Maple Nut Fudge / Fudge med Lønnesirup og Nøtter

A sweet recipe found in “Condenced Milk
and its use in Good Cookery” published by
Borden’s Condenced Milk Company in 1927

Maple Nut Fudge / Fudge med Lønnesirup og Nøtter

Fudge is a type of confectionery which is made by mixing sugar, butter and milk, heating it to the soft-ball stage at 238° F (116° C), and then beating the mixture while it cools so that it acquires a smooth, creamy consistency. Fruits, nuts, chocolate, caramel, candies, and other flavors are sometimes added either inside or on top. It is often bought as a gift from a gift shop in tourist areas and attractions.

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Orange Cream Custard / Kremet Appelsinpudding

A dessert recipe found in “Each Taste a Treat –
97 Delicious Recipes”  published by
Borden’s Condenced Milk Company in 1929

Orange Cream Custard / Kremet Appelsinpudding

Another dessert based on oranges for you here, way back from
the roaring twenties this time- Ted

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Spanish Cream / Spansk Krem

A dessert recipe found in “Condenced Milk and its use
in Good Cookery” published by Borden’s Condenced
Milk Company in 1927

Spanish Cream / Spansk Krem

The recipes and instructions in these old cookbooks from the 1920s are so short and to the point that if housewives and cooks from back then had a chance to take a look in today’s cookbooks with all their explanations and pictures and what have you, they would probably thing we are all right behind the barn as they say in the Yorkshire Dales.

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New England Boiled Dinner with Cranberry Pudding / New England Kokt Middag med Tyttebærpudding

A classic dinner recipe found in “What’s New in Cookery” published by Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Co in 1928
New England Boiled Dinner with Cranberry Pudding / New England Kokt Middag med Tyttebærpudding

When Grover Cleveland took over the presidency from Chester A. Arthur in 1885, he inherited more than a new address and the nation’s problems. He came into a legacy of epicurean dining that he loathed. The former President had liked his food with its nose in the air: dits of foie gras, dots of charlotte russe; he even dandified his macaroni pie by adding oysters. Cleveland, a regular Joe of simple tastes, put up with the fancy food; but one night, catching a whiff of corned beef and cabbage being eaten by the servants, the president traded his Arthurian meal for theirs. “It was the best dinner I had had for months,” he later beamed.

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Coffee Ribbon Bavarian / Lagdelt Dessert Smaksatt med Kaffe

A dessert recipe from “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925Coffee Ribbon Bavarian / Lagdelt Dessert Smaksatt med Kaffe

Another of those desserts for adults from the book that tells you the story of coffee and gives you recipes for coffee tasting goodies.

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Buckwheat Cakes / Bokhvetepannekaker

A classic Ameican breakfast griddle cake recipe found in
“The Art of Baking Bread” published by
The Northwestern Yeast Co in 1922
Buckwheat Cakes / Bokhvetepannekaker

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a plant cultivated for its grain-like seeds and as a cover crop. To distinguish it from a related species, Fagopyrum tataricum, it is also known as common buckwheat, Japanese buckwheat and silverhull buckwheat.

Despite the name, buckwheat is not related to wheat, as it is not a grass. Instead, buckwheat is related to sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb. Because its seeds are eaten and rich in complex carbohydrates, it is referred to as a pseudocereal. The cultivation of buckwheat grain declined sharply in the 20th century with the adoption of nitrogen fertilizer that increased the productivity of other staples.

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Veal Birds / Benløse Fugler

A dinner recipe found in “What’s New in Cookery” published
by Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Co in 1928

Veal Birds / Benløse Fugler

This dish was very popular among the people of the upper echelon
in Norway in the seventies. As I’m in no way part of that crowd I’m
not sure if they still serve it or if other dishes with similar confusing
names are more in vogue in those circles to day

Ted
Winking smile
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Holiday Cake / Helligdagskake

A cake recipe found in “Coconut – Sun Sweetness From
The Tropics”  published by Franklin Baker Company in 1928

Holiday Cake / Helligdagskake

Since our National Day is only four days away here in Norway
I thought it appropriate to post a holiday cake to day so
my Norwegian visitors had time to bake it

Ted
Winking smile

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Coffee Spice Cake / Kaffe- og Krydderkake

A cake recipe found in “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925Coffee Spice Cake / Kaffe- og Krydderkake

As I mentioned the first time I posted from this book, food flavoured with coffee tends to be most popular among grown-ups. But who cares, as I concluded then, we are grown-ups aren’t we – Ted

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Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

An ice cream recipe found in “Condenced Milk and its use
in Good Cookery” published by  Borden’s Condenced Milk
Company in 1927

Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

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Russian Coffee Frappé / Russisk Kaffe Frappé

An ice coffee recipe found in “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925
Russian Coffee Frappé / Russisk Kaffe Frappé

Wikipedia: Frappé coffee (also Greek frappé or café frappé Greek: φραπές, frapés) is a Greek foam-covered iced coffee drink made from instant coffee (generally, spray-dried). Accidentally invented by a Nescafe representative named Dimitris Vakondios in 1957 in the city of Thessaloniki, it is now the most popular coffee among Greek youth and foreign tourists. It is popular in Greece, and Cyprus, especially during the summer, but has now spread to other countries. The word frappé is French and comes from the verb frapper which means to ‘strike’; in this context, however, in French, when describing a drink, the word frappé means chilled, as with ice cubes in a shaker. The frappé has become a hallmark of post-war outdoor Greek coffee culture.

Since this Russian recipe made with real brewed coffee is from 1925
I guess Mr Nescafe Representative must have simply pretended
to invent the frappé coffee after having stolen it from the Russians
in order to push his useless instant coffee

Ted
Winking smile

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