Calzone al Prosciutto Cotto Affumicato – Calzone with Ham and Apples / Calzone med Skinke og Eple

A calzone from ”Pizza” a book in the “Kjøkkenbiblioteket”  (Kitchen Library) series published by Aventura Forlag in 1992.
Calzone al Prosciutto Cotto Affumicato

This recipe originates from the Alto Adige region in northern Italy. Feel free to substitute ham with other types of pork. But do not cut out horseradish, it brings out a lot of flavor from the meat and apples. One variation is to form the calzone with an open top.

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Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

A classic Scndinavian waffle recipe found on aperitif.no
Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

Waffle Day on 25 March is a Swedish invention, and why it is celebrated rests on a misunderstanding. The day is the same as “Vårfruedag” – the day Virgin Mary learns that she is with child. “Vårfruedag” turned over time into “Vaffeldag” (Waffle Day) in Sweden but also here in Norway, it was customary to celebrate “Vårfruedag” with cakes.

Although we feel an ownership to waffles here in Scandinavia, similar cakes are eaten most places in the world. They can be round or square, thick or thin – the heart-shaped waffles is however typical of Scandinavia. The first electric waffle iron was designed by General Electric and entered the market in 1911.

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WWII Homity Pie / WWII Homity Pai

A pie recipe from The Second World War  found on historyextra.com
WWII Homity Pie / WWII Homity Pai

No one knows where the name for Homity Pie originates from but the dish was popular with land girls during the Second World War. As well as unrationed items, the recipe also includes rationed foods like cheese, eggs and butter – the original recipe would have used these frugally. Nowadays we don’t have to be so sparing with the cheese and butter, which only make it even tastier.

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates homity pie – a hearty, vegetarian dish popular during the Second World War.

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In Contex

The Land Girls

The Women’s Land Army (WLA) was a British civilian organisation created during the First and Second World Wars so women could work in agriculture, replacing men called up to the military. Women who worked for the WLA were commonly known as Land Girls. The name Women’s Land Army was also used in the United States for an organisation formally called the Woman’s Land Army of America.

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In effect the Land Army operated to place women with farms that needed workers, the farmers being their employers.

Second World War

As the prospect of war became increasingly likely, the government wanted to increase the amount of food grown within Britain. In order to grow more food, more help was needed on the farms and so the government started the Women’s Land Army in June 1939.

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The majority of the Land Girls already lived in the countryside but more than a third came from London and the industrial cities of the north of England.

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In the Second World War, though under the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, it was given an honorary head – Lady Gertrude Denman. At first it asked for volunteers. This was supplemented by conscription, so that by 1944 it had over 80,000 members. The WLA lasted until its official disbandment on 21 October 1949.

Land girls were also formed to supply New Zealand’s agriculture during the war. City girls from the age of 17 and up were sent to assist on sheep, cattle, dairy, orchard and poultry properties.

In popular culture

The Women’s Land Army was the subject of:

Apple Pandowdy / Eple Pandowdy

A 17th Century dessert recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Apple Pandowdy / Eple Pandowdy

The girl who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: According to John Mariani in “The Dictionary of American Food and Drink”, pandowdy was first mentioned in print in 1805. The dessert turned up decades later in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Blithedale Romance” (1852):

“Hollingsworth [would] fill my plate from the great dish of
pan-dowdy.”

In the meantime, it was supposedly a favorite of Abigail and John Adams, although a recipe I saw attributed to Abigail has a pastry-dough crust, not a biscuit topping. Which is a true pandowdy? I don’t think anyone really knows for sure.

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Karriboller Og Kokosris / Curry Meatballs And Coconut Rice

A contemporary Norwegian dinner recipe found on rema.no
Karriboller Og Kokosris / Curry Meatballs And Coconut Rice

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Rema 1000 – A part of Norwegian grocers history

It began with the pursuit of a retail concept that was different than the traditional corner store. On a study trip to Germany in 1977 representatives of the Reitan Group were  impressed by the German discount chain ALDI’s implemented simplicity. When Odd Reitan opened the first REMA grocers February 15th, 1979 at Bromstad in Trondheim it was an ALDI imitation.

The initial phase

In the initial phase the selection was limited to 500-600 articles, but this range was too narrow to be profitable. The store in Mo i Rana, which opened the following year, therefore increased the range of products to 1,000 articles. This was a great success and was continued in the three stores which from then went by the name REMA. It also led to the name of the chain being changed to Rema 1000 – an abbreviation for Reitan Food, 1000 articles.

Expansion

The REMA 1000 concept has over the years been developed and improved, and the range of articles has changed in step with the times and customers’ shopping habits. But the Reitan Group still work by the same original philosophy.

Today

The Reitan family are among the richest people in Norway and not long ago people like that had a social conscience. But not in our day and age, The Reitan Group has recently changed their beer distribution routines to increase their earnings even more and it is already begining to cost people their jobs at local breweries. Mack Brewery in Tromsø announced today that they are forced to let 35 people go.

Cambridge Market Sandwich / Sandwich Fra Cambridge Markedet

A great British sandwich recipe  found on food52.com
Cambridge Market Sandwich / Sandwich Fra Cambridge Markedet

How many times have you eaten blue cheese and apples and in how many combinations and yet never thought of putting them together in a sandwich. In Cambridge you can get them  wrapped in brown paper, and eat them on a bench outside of King’s College while the choir practiced for an upcoming concert and the students rushed around in their robes.

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Apple Pork / Epleflesk

A Swedish dinner recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Skaninavisk Press as in 1977

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This is an old and popular dish in Sweden, but for Mrs. Newlywed, it might just be a première. (Top text of the recipe)

Isn’t it strange that even at the end a seventies there was no discussion about who belonged in the kitchen, it was the lady of the house – Ted  😉

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Liqueur Pancakes / Likørpannekaker

A classic dessert recipe found in “Desserter” (Desserts)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981

Liqueur Pancakes / Likørpannekaker

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Apple, Vodka and Ginger Beer Cocktail / Eple, Vodka og Ingefærøl Cocktail

A refreshing cocktail recipe, family friendly to taste
found on
Tesco Real Food
Apple, Vodka and Ginger Beer Cocktail / Eple, Vodka og Ingefærøl Cocktail

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Apple Pancake / Eplepannekake

A dessert omelette recipe found in “Med Bær og Frukt”
(With Fruit and Berries) published by
Hjemmets kokebokklubb in 1982

Apple Pancake / Eplepannekake

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Cornwall Toast / Cornwalltoast

A delicious toast recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Skaninavisk Press as in 1977

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Dorset Apple Cake / Dorset Eplekake

A classic English kake recipe found on bbcgoodfood.com
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A rustic bake with chunks of sweet fruit and a crunchy
demerara sugar topping.

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Old-School Pork Chops with Apples and Sage / Gammeldagse Svinekoteletter med Epler og Salvie

A great pork recipe found on jamieoliver.com
Old-school pork chops with apples and sage_post

Jamie Oliver’s take on a delicious British classic.

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Apples and Yams / Epler og Yams

A recipe from “Are You Hungry Tonight?” published in 1992apples and jams_post

Ask anybody south of the Mason-Dixon line to talk about side dishes and yams always come up. This variation on the usual theme brings together two of the King’s favorites.

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Yam is the common name for some plant species in the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae) that form edible tubers.

yamsThese are perennial herbaceous vines cultivated for the consumption of their starchy tubers in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean and Oceania. There are many cultivars of yam. Although some varieties of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) are also called yam in parts of the United States and Canada, sweet potato is not part of the family Dioscoreaceae but belongs in the unrelated morning glory family Convolvulaceae.

Yams are monocots, related to lilies and grasses. Native to Africa and Asia, yam tubers vary in size from that of a small potato to over 60 kg (130 lb). There are over 600 varieties of yams and 95 percent of these crops are grown in Africa.

The differences between true yam and sweet potato “yam”

Yams are a monocot (a plant having one embryonic seed leaf) and from the Dioscoreaceae family. Sweet Potatoes are a dicot (a plant having two embryonic seed leaves) and are from the Convolvulaceae family. Therefore, they are about as distantly related as two flowering plants can be. Culinarily, yams are starchier and drier than sweet potatoes. The table below lists some differences between yam and sweet potato.

Medieval Monday – Fake Fish / Falsk Fisk

A virtuous lent oriented recipe found on historyextra.com
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In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates fake fish – a medieval apple pie for Lent.

In the Middle Ages, people were instructed not to eat meat during Lent. Yet the ban didn’t apply to fish – in fact, Dutch gourmets enjoyed serving up ‘fish’ dishes so much that they devised this fish-shaped apple pie. With no animal products, it’s every bit as virtuous as it is delicious.

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