Pineapple Cake / Ananaskake

A kake recipe found in “Famous Southern Baking Recipes for Better Baking” published by Snow King in 1929
Pineapple Cake / Ananaskake

Recipe by Mrs. J. E Eubank Appling, Georgia (see picture). This reripe won first prize at a district contest held in Augusta, Ga.

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Dairy-Free Marzipan Tea Cake/ Marsipantekake Uten Meieriprodukter

A cake recipe from “So Delightful -50 Dairy-Free Recipes That Are Truly So Delicious” published by So Delicious Dairy Free
Dairy-Free Marzipan Tea Cake/ Marsipantekake Uten MeieriprodukterApart from being dairy-free this cake is also soy-free.

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4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

4 cake recipes found in “Moderne Baking” (Modern Baking)
published by Freia as in 1938 to promote their baking powder

4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

Baking is strange, our breakfast, lunch and dinner habits and menus change a lot from decade to decade, but our favourite cakes recipes hardly ever change. “Moderne Baking” was published 80 years ago and still you could find these four recipes in one version or other in just about any contemporary baking cook book.

Its nice to know there are still some constants in our lives in these times of rapid changes – Ted

Winking smile

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Sunshine Cake / Solskinnskake

A quick and easy cake recipe found in “Kaker til Kaffekosen” (Coffee Time Cakes) published by Gyldendal in 1991
Sunshine Cake / Silskinnskake

Notice the word “kaffekosen” (kaffe + kos) in the title of the book in Norwegian The word “kos” is closely connected to the Norwegian word “hygge” that was adopted by the English language last year.

Both “hygge” and “kos” are a little hard to explain in English because both words are so tightly connected to the Norwegian mentality. Both words are nouns, but can also be used as verbs “hygge seg” and “kose seg” and it is the verbs that are most often used here in Norway.

Rather loosely both can be translated into ‘having a good time’ or ‘having a nice time’. Several large international surveys have shown that Norwegians are among the happiest people in the world, usually just beaten by the Danish. Our quest for having a nice time should explain a lot of that result.

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Drømmegod Rullekake / Dreamlike Roly Poly

A delicious Swiss roll recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
Drømmegod Rullekake / Dreamlike Roly Poly

Jelly Roll, Swiss Roll or Roly Poly is an old English recipe. The earliest published reference for a rolled cake spread with jelly was in the Northern Farmer, a journal published in Utica, New York, in December 1852. Called “To Make Jelly Cake”, the recipe describes a modern “jelly roll” and reads: “Bake quick and while hot spread with jelly. Roll carefully, and wrap it in a cloth. When cold cut in slices for the table.”

The terminology evolved in America for many years. From 1852 to 1877 such a dessert was called: Jelly Cake (1852), Roll Jelly Cake (1860), Swiss Roll (1872), Jelly Roll (1873), and Rolled Jelly Cake (1876). The name “Jelly Roll” was eventually adopted.

The origin of the term “Swiss roll” is unknown. The earliest British reference to a rolled cake by that name appeared on a bill of fare dated 18 June 1871, published in the 1872 book A Voyage from Southampton to Cape Town, in the Union Company’s Mail Steamer “Syria” (London). A recipe for “Swiss roll” also appeared in the U.S. that same year in The American Home Cook Book, published in Detroit, Michigan, in 1872.

Several 1880s to 1890s cookbooks from London, England, used the name Swiss roll exclusively.

The American Pastry Cook, published in Chicago in 1894, presented a basic “Jelly Roll Mixture” then listed variants made from it that included a Swiss roll, Venice roll, Paris roll, chocolate roll, jelly roll cotelettes, and decorated jelly rolls.

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Baking Powder Rolls / Bakepulver-Rundstykker

A baking powder recipe found in “Snow King’s Famous Southern Baking Recipes for Better Baking” published in 1929
Baking Powder Rolls / Bakepulver-Rundstykker

Recipe by Irene Paschall (see picture), Brush Creek, Tenn. The recipe won a prize at Woodman’s  Picnic, Brush Creek, Tenn., in 1924.

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