Coffee And Molasses Dream Bars / Drømmekaker med Kaffe og Mørk Sirup

A flashback from the thirties found at lostrecipesfound.com
Coffee And Molasses Dream Bars / Drømmekaker med Kaffe og Mørk Sirup

These bars are richly flavored with molasses, strong coffee and a generous portion of ground cloves. They’re adapted from a recipe originally published 33 years ago in a community cookbook from Ladies Aid at Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church in South Milwaukee. Slather the coffee icing on while the bars are still warm.

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Herb Bread / Urtebrød

A fancy bread recipe found in “Gjærbakst” (Yeast Bakery)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979

Herb Bread / Urtebrød

Baking bread where the dough has been given a pattern by rising in a basket or baking them in pans, clay bowls or clay flower pots makes a nice change from standard bread baking.These herb bread are baked in clay pots, and may even be served at the table in the pots.

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Slab Bread / Hellebrød

A recipe for Stone Age bread gound on nrk.no
headingSlab Bread / Hellebrød

Why not bake your own bread when you’re camping? Baking bread on a slab of stone is bread baking Stone Age style. If you really want to create authentic northern European Stone Age bread replace the wheat grains and wheat flour in the recipe with rye grain and rye flour. The wheat had not come this far north at that time. And skip the salt and taste the bread with wild herbs that would have grown here then, for example, yarrow or nettles.

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Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

A no-bake chocolate cake recipe found in “The Chocolate Book”
by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

Sometimes it’s nice to make a cake that needs no baking, just an overnight stay in the refrigerator. This is such a chocolate cake, full of crunchy and sweet goodies.

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4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

4 cake recipes found in “Moderne Baking” (Modern Baking)
published by Freia as in 1938 to promote their baking powder

4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

Baking is strange, our breakfast, lunch and dinner habits and menus change a lot from decade to decade, but our favourite cakes recipes hardly ever change. “Moderne Baking” was published 80 years ago and still you could find these four recipes in one version or other in just about any contemporary baking cook book.

Its nice to know there are still some constants in our lives in these times of rapid changes – Ted

Winking smile

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Sunshine Cake / Solskinnskake

A quick and easy cake recipe found in “Kaker til Kaffekosen” (Coffee Time Cakes) published by Gyldendal in 1991
Sunshine Cake / Silskinnskake

Notice the word “kaffekosen” (kaffe + kos) in the title of the book in Norwegian The word “kos” is closely connected to the Norwegian word “hygge” that was adopted by the English language last year.

Both “hygge” and “kos” are a little hard to explain in English because both words are so tightly connected to the Norwegian mentality. Both words are nouns, but can also be used as verbs “hygge seg” and “kose seg” and it is the verbs that are most often used here in Norway.

Rather loosely both can be translated into ‘having a good time’ or ‘having a nice time’. Several large international surveys have shown that Norwegians are among the happiest people in the world, usually just beaten by the Danish. Our quest for having a nice time should explain a lot of that result.

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Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

A classic Scndinavian waffle recipe found on aperitif.no
Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

Waffle Day on 25 March is a Swedish invention, and why it is celebrated rests on a misunderstanding. The day is the same as “Vårfruedag” – the day Virgin Mary learns that she is with child. “Vårfruedag” turned over time into “Vaffeldag” (Waffle Day) in Sweden but also here in Norway, it was customary to celebrate “Vårfruedag” with cakes.

Although we feel an ownership to waffles here in Scandinavia, similar cakes are eaten most places in the world. They can be round or square, thick or thin – the heart-shaped waffles is however typical of Scandinavia. The first electric waffle iron was designed by General Electric and entered the market in 1911.

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Drømmegod Rullekake / Dreamlike Roly Poly

A delicious Swiss roll recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
Drømmegod Rullekake / Dreamlike Roly Poly

Jelly Roll, Swiss Roll or Roly Poly is an old English recipe. The earliest published reference for a rolled cake spread with jelly was in the Northern Farmer, a journal published in Utica, New York, in December 1852. Called “To Make Jelly Cake”, the recipe describes a modern “jelly roll” and reads: “Bake quick and while hot spread with jelly. Roll carefully, and wrap it in a cloth. When cold cut in slices for the table.”

The terminology evolved in America for many years. From 1852 to 1877 such a dessert was called: Jelly Cake (1852), Roll Jelly Cake (1860), Swiss Roll (1872), Jelly Roll (1873), and Rolled Jelly Cake (1876). The name “Jelly Roll” was eventually adopted.

The origin of the term “Swiss roll” is unknown. The earliest British reference to a rolled cake by that name appeared on a bill of fare dated 18 June 1871, published in the 1872 book A Voyage from Southampton to Cape Town, in the Union Company’s Mail Steamer “Syria” (London). A recipe for “Swiss roll” also appeared in the U.S. that same year in The American Home Cook Book, published in Detroit, Michigan, in 1872.

Several 1880s to 1890s cookbooks from London, England, used the name Swiss roll exclusively.

The American Pastry Cook, published in Chicago in 1894, presented a basic “Jelly Roll Mixture” then listed variants made from it that included a Swiss roll, Venice roll, Paris roll, chocolate roll, jelly roll cotelettes, and decorated jelly rolls.

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Bee Stings / Bistikk

A traditional Norwegian cake recipe found in “Gjærbakst”
(Yeast Baking) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979

Bee Stings / Bistikk

Please don’t ask me how a cake can end up with a name like Bee Sting. I can’t imagine anyone finding anything remotely positive with getting a bee sting yet the cake is absolutely delicious. It’s a strange world is all I can say – Ted 😉

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St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A classic British pierecipe foung on BBCgoodfood
St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A very British version of Key lime pie – an indulgent, creamy pai with tangy oranges and lemons.

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Gáhkko – Sami Bread / Samisk Brød

A traditional Sami bread recipe found on mytaste.no
headingGáhkko – Sami Bread / Samisk Brød

Gáhkko is a traditional Sami flat bread /bread that has a faint taste of anise. Excellent, and delicious as an accessory for stews and soups, and gorgeous with any kind of cheese. There are countless recipes and ways to bake it, but the best way and what gives the bread the best flavour is to fry them in a dry frying pan on the campfire. It works just as fine to bake this bread on a griddle or in an oven as well. Some sami bakers  make them them large, some make them small.

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Orange Flower Macaroons / Appelsinblomst makroner

An interwar years cake recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Orange Flower Macaroons / Appelsinblomst makroner

In the interwar years, the Afternoon Tea had dwindled down to ‘at homes’ with guests, but it remained popular.  More or less intricate cakes and sandwiches were served with freshly brewed tea.

This recipe is particularly is easy to make. Some period recipes are quite tricky and don’t always work. This one is very forgiving and therefore it’s a good one for an inexperienced cook.

Macaroon is the English translation from the French word “Macarone”. Most have almonds as their principal ingredient, but you can also have coconut macaroons too. All are delicious!

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Empire Biscuits / Empir Kjeks

A classic Scottish biscuit recipe found on allrecipes.com
Empire Biscuits / Empir Kjeks

This shortbread cookie is a traditional Scottish recipe. These are round cookies sandwiched with jam and topped off with a delicious icing and a cherry.

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White Batter Bread / Loff Bakt Med Røre

A bread recipe found in “The Fleischmann Treasury
of Yeast Baking” published in 1962

White Batter Bread / Loff Bakt Med Røre

I know white bread is not considered the healthiest of pastries, but you got to admit it tastes great. A fresh cup of Assam and a decent blue cheese on fresh white bread. That’s a little piece of everyday magic, if you ask me – Ted  😉

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Oat Bread / Havrebød

A great bread recipe found on spar.no
Oat Bread / Havrebød

Oats are sweet, earthy-flavored grains. They are low in fat and cholesterol free. They are also easily digested and provide a great source of protein. Oats have almost no gluten so flour made from oats needs to be mixed with white or whole wheat flour for yeast breads. The more oats you use, the denser and more crumbly your bread will be.

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