Apple, Lemon and Ricotta Pancakes / Eple, Sitron og Ricotta Pannekaker

A fresh acidic breakfast recipe found on “Healthy Recipes with Dairy Food” a free e-book published by Dairy AustraliaApple, Lemon and Ricotta Pancakes / Eple, Sitron og Ricotta Pannekaker

Kickstart the day with these refreshing acidic pancakes topped with fresh fruits and a lemon-ricotta cream. With a few cups of Assam this should easily keep you going till lunchtime.

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Granola Pancakes with Bacon / Müslipannekaker med Bacon

A delicious breakfast recipe found on gilde.no
Granola Pancakes with Bacon / Müslipannekaker med Bacon

Pancakes for breakfast gets even better with bacon. The combination of sweet and salty is unbeatable.

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Jane Austen’s Black Butter Jam / Jane Austens Smørbare Syltetøy

A simple but delicious jam recipe found on Bite From The Past
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The Girl who runs Bite From The Past writes: I have been dying to make this ever since I spotted it in The Jane Austen Cookbook by Maggie Black and Deirdre LeFaye.

This is the easiest jam you’ll ever make in your life-and it makes good use of leftover pieces of fruit. It’s funny to me that the instructions state this is a jam for children-probably because it’s a mixed up combination of fruit. I think it’s a wonderful addition to any biscuit or bread at tea time.

In this batch, I used strawberries, two apples that were starting to shrivel, and a couple of really ripe pears. Peel the skins off the apples and pears. You can also use peaches or plums-just be sure to blanche them first to remove the skin.

I did not can these – although you can to preserve them longer. I merely put mine in canning jars and set them in the very back of my refrigerator, where they lasted for several months!

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Mutton Mince Pie / Pai med Kjøttdeig av Lam

A savoury pie recipe found on bonappetit.com
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A sweet-and-savory main course adapted from “The English Huswife” by Gervase Markham published i 1615.

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Lyle’s Berry Delicious Cheesecake Picnic Puds / Lyle’s Deilige Bær og Ostekake Piknikkrukker

A great picnic idea found on lylesgoldensyrup.comLyle's berry delicious cheesecake picnic puds_post

Simple to make – and even easier to eat! These gorgeous picnic desserts are fresh, fruity and delicious.

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Jane Austen’s Flummery

A dessert recipe inspired by Jane Austen’s novels
found in historyextra.com
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Whether it’s breakfast at Northanger Abbey, tea and cake at Mansfield Park, or one of Mrs Bennet’s dinners to impress, food is an important theme in Jane Austen’s novels. And now, Austen fans can recreate the dishes featured in the author’s works, thanks to new book “Dinner with Mr Darcy” by Pen Vogler

Flummery is a white jelly, which was set in elegant molds or as shapes in clear jelly. Its delicate, creamy taste goes particularly well with rhubarb, strawberries, and raspberries. A modern version would be to add the puréed fruit to the ingredients, taking away the same volume of water.

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Pancake Cake / Pannekakekake

A delicious Norwegian recipe found in “Cappelens Kokebok”
(Cappelen’s Kook Book) published in 1991
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There are many ways to serve pancakes.
This is one of the nicest ones – Ted

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Queen Jam / Dronningsyltetøy

A classic Norwegian jam recipe found in “Sylting og Dypfrysing”
(Jam Making and Deep-freezing) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981

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Back in the fifties and sixties when I was a kid most families around where we lived headed for the mountains or the woodlands to pick berries as soon as they were ripe. My family picked raspberries, lingonberries,coudberries and blueberries every year and my mom would make jams and jellies. Strawberries and apples were bought around the same time and and they ended up as jams and jellies too.

Anyone who have tasted homemade conserves like these know that they beat the shop bought stuff by a mile – Ted

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Home Made Norwegian Cordials

I’ve posted a lot of different porridge recipes on this blog and what we usually drink with these porridge here is a drink made from either shop bought or homemade cordials. Every Norwegian grocer will have a wide range of cordials for sale.

In my childhhod, back in the fifties and sixties this was a usual drink for kids for any kind of meal really, sodas was just for special occations back then and home made cordials was quite common.

saftThese cordials could be made from a lot of different berries or fruits; plums, cherries, rhubarb, black currants, red currants, blueberries, raspberries and strawberries and more seldom cranberries or combinations of several of these. And most homes had a special kind of pan for making cordials, a lot still have and make cordials every autumn.

Both blueberry and black currant cordials served as a hot toddy are still believed to have a healing effect on the common cold. And when I was a kid one could buy hot black currant toddy at any given winter sport arrangement. And in my childhood all boys and girls were well behaved if promised “saft og boller” – cold drinks made with cordials and fresh buns.

Cordials have other uses than drink of course, they are great for making sorbets, dessert sauces, adding taste to home made ice cream and cakes. Besides they make a very good basis for liqueurs if you are short of time.

Cordial Pan

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The cordial pan is stacked like this; (1) at the bottom, (2) on top of that with (3) inside of that and (4) on the top. Steam from water boiling in (1) reaches the berries and fruit through the holes in (3) and raw cordial drips down into (2) and can be poured out via (5) which can be closed and open as needed.

What you get out of the cordial pan is called “råsaft” (raw cordial) and can be frozen for further use. To make real cordial you have to cook the raw cordial with sugar and a little wine acid. Both sugar and wine acid will work as conserving agents and will make the cordial keep for ages.

Homemade Strawberry Jam / Hjemmelaget Jordbærsyltetøy

A simple straightforward Norwegian recipe for
strawberry jam found on frukt.no

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Homemade is usually the best, and so it is with strawberry jam too. What’s better than waffles, French toast or fresh bread with homemade strawberry jam?

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Rote Grütze – German Fruit Pudding / Tysk Bærpudding

A German dessert speciality found on expatica.com
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This red fruit pudding is a popular dessert in the North. It’s made from black and red currants, raspberries and sometimes strawberries or cherries, which are cooked in their juice and thickened with a little potato starch or cornflour. It’s served with cream, vanilla sauce or milk.

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Crepes Appleton

A dessert recipe from a special 17th of May menu
found on godt.no
 
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This recipe is a part of a 17th of May (Norway’s National day) menu inspired by King Olav’s favorite dishes.

Crepes Appleton got its name from Appleton House where King Olav was born. And maybe these small and airy “pancakes” were a sweet childhood memory for the  King? Crepe Appleton is still served at family gatherings there and is so popular a dessert that it might be served twice during the same meal.

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1950’s Dessert Porriges & Compotes / Dessertgrøter og Kompotter fra Femtitallet

A recipe from “God Og Billig Hverdagsmat” (Nice And Inexpensive Food) published by N W Damm & Sønn in 1955
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I grew up on desserts like these, Ready made desserts was scarse on the ground in the first 2 post-WWII dacades in Norway and what was available was both lacking in taste and quality. Besides making most of these is hardly more time consuming than opening some packages and mix and heat the content – Ted

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Tipsy Laird Trifle / Den Småfulle Lordens Trifle

A classic Scottish trifle found on britishfood.about.com522_tipsy_laird_triffle_post

Tipsy Laird is the Scottish trifle dessert served on Burns Night. It is essentially the same as Trifle, the pudding that has graced British tables for centuries but with whisky not sherry, and Scottish raspberries.

Jelly may not always be used but no Trifle is complete without custard. This version is quick and easy to make using ready-made custard or make with custard powder following the packet instructions.

Use Scottish raspberries if you can for complete authenticity. For an even richer dessert, finish the trifle by grating dark or white chocolate over.

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Recipe posted at:
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Moonlight Pudding / Måneskinnspudding

A classic Norwegian dessert with historic connections
found on detsoteliv.no
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This was actually the favourite dessert of Norway’s great composer, Edvard Grieg. Grieg had his last big party under the chandeliers at Engebret Café in Oslo in 1906, the year before he died. On Engebret Café’s website you can read that “at this party real turtle soup, moonlight pudding and sweet Champagne was served”.

By this one should understands that “Moonlight Pudding” was regarded as a luxurious dessert in the past, and that means it is well worth bringing it back on the menu.

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Recipe posted at:
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