Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

A no-bake chocolate cake recipe found in “The Chocolate Book”
by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

Sometimes it’s nice to make a cake that needs no baking, just an overnight stay in the refrigerator. This is such a chocolate cake, full of crunchy and sweet goodies.

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St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A classic British pierecipe foung on BBCgoodfood
St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A very British version of Key lime pie – an indulgent, creamy pai with tangy oranges and lemons.

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Apple Pandowdy / Eple Pandowdy

A 17th Century dessert recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Apple Pandowdy / Eple Pandowdy

The girl who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: According to John Mariani in “The Dictionary of American Food and Drink”, pandowdy was first mentioned in print in 1805. The dessert turned up decades later in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Blithedale Romance” (1852):

“Hollingsworth [would] fill my plate from the great dish of
pan-dowdy.”

In the meantime, it was supposedly a favorite of Abigail and John Adams, although a recipe I saw attributed to Abigail has a pastry-dough crust, not a biscuit topping. Which is a true pandowdy? I don’t think anyone really knows for sure.

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Empire Biscuits / Empir Kjeks

A classic Scottish biscuit recipe found on allrecipes.com
Empire Biscuits / Empir Kjeks

This shortbread cookie is a traditional Scottish recipe. These are round cookies sandwiched with jam and topped off with a delicious icing and a cherry.

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Grandma’s Oat Biscuits / Bestemors Havrekjeks

A classic Norwegian biscuit  recipe found on
furkunnjmat.no via alleoppskrifter.no
Grandma’s Oat Biscuits / Bestemors Havrekjeks

Oat biscuits have been staple food in Norway for ages and someone’s granny obviously made some pretty nice ones as this recipe ended up on one of Norway’s most popular recipe sites – Ted

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18th Century Ship’s Bisket / 1800talls Skipskjeks

Authentic ships bisket recipe found on savouringthepast.net
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Jas Townsend who runs savouringthepast.net writes: This Ship’s Bisket is known by many names. Most of the time it was called just bisket, sometimes it was called hard bisket or brown bisket, sea bisket and ship’s bread. Now many today might want to call it hard tack, but hard tack is really a 19th century term that was popularized during the American civil war.

These 18th century biskets are not like today’s buttery flaky version that we serve along with sausage gravy for breakfast. These biskets were not made to be enjoyed; they were made out of necessity.

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Ship’s captains faced a continual challenge of having enough food on board to feed a large crew for a long journey. Food spoilage was really his greatest concern. Fresh bread rapidly became moldy on long trips and stored flour would go rancid and bug ridden, so hard bisket was really born out of necessity.

It was a means of food preservation. If it was prepared and stored properly it would last for a year or more. In addition to preservation, the bisket form also helped in portability and in dividing the rations when it came time. Soldiers and sailors typically got one pound of bread a day and biskets were usually about four ounces so when it came time to distribute them, each sailor or soldier would get four biskets.

Biskets from London were considered to be the highest quality. They were the most resistant to mold and insects. They were really the standard by which all the other bisket maker’s aspired to, but not all biskets were the same quality.

Old-Fashioned Gingersnaps / Gammeldagse Ingefærkjeks

An old spicy cookie recipe found on bhg.com
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Gingersnaps, also called ginger biscuits, are a type of cookie. The name comes from the fact these cookies traditionally are very crispy and make a snapping sound when eaten. Gingersnaps are a derivation of gingerbread and were invented hundreds of years ago. People in colonial times enjoyed these cookies, both in European countries and in America.

Origins

Ginger is derived from the ginger root and is native to parts of South Asia; historians believe it was first cultivated in India. Ginger was prized for its valuable effects on health and imported for its medicinal uses before it was utilized for cooking purposes. Ginger found its way to ancient Rome, then to Africa and the Caribbean. In medieval times, ginger was imported to Europe in preserved form to be used in baking treats such as cakes and cookies.

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Quaker Bonnet Biscuits / Quaker Kyse Kjeks

A traditional biscuit recipe found on bhg.com
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These hat-shaped biscuits will remind you of tender yeast rolls. Serve them with hot soup or a crisp, cool salad.

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Crispy Cheese Biscuits / Sprø Ostekjeks

A sharp tasty biscuit recipe found on tine.no
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These biscuits are a natural part of any cheese party and they tastes delicious with salads and soup. With both matured edam and cayenne they have a sharp and delicious taste.

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Easter Biscuits / Påskekjeks

A delicious biscuit recipe found in
“Robert Carrier’s Kitchen Cook Book”
published in 1980

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Afternoon Tea Spiced Biscuits / Krydret Ettermiddagste Kjeks

A classic afternoontea recipe found on realfood.tesco.comAfternoon tea spiced tea biscuits_realfood-tesco_post

Afternoon tea is a light meal typically eaten between 4 pm and 6 pm. Observance of the custom originated amongst the wealthy classes in England in the 1840s. Anna Maria Russell, Duchess of Bedford, is widely credited as transforming afternoon tea in England into a late-afternoon meal whilst visiting Belvoir Castle. By the end of the nineteenth century, afternoon tea developed to its current form and was observed by both the upper and middle classes. It had become ubiquitous, even in the isolated village in the fictionalised memoir Lark Rise to Candleford, where a cottager lays out what she calls a “visitor’s tea” for their landlady: “the table was laid… there were the best tea things with a fat pink rose on the side of each cup; hearts of lettuce, thin bread and butter, and the crisp little cakes that had been baked in readiness that morning.”

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Karlsbad Cake / Karlsbadkake

A recipe from “The Best of International Cooking”
published by Hamlyn in 1984

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In context:
Two centuries ago, when the United States was putting together a government of the people, European aristocrats, in their gilded world, were flocking to the “pearl” of the international spas at Carlsbad and discovering a new pastry phenomenon The Original Carlsbad Oblaten. It quickly became the favorite treat of continental high society.

000_Carlsbad OblatenThe wafer’s delicate crispness and subtle almond flavor proved to be a taste sensation in itself and a flavor complement to ice cream, fruit, coffee, tea, or milk. Its savor found favor as an elegant counterpoint to champagne, wine or liqueurs.

The wafers themselves are a compliment to their birthplace. Each one bears a relief design of the famous Carlsbad geyser, discovered in 1349 by no less a personage than Roman Emperor and Bohemian (Czech) King, Charles IV. The town was named in his honor; Carlsbad translates to “Carl’s Bath”.

For 200 years The Original Carlsbad Oblaten recipe has been a jealously guarded secret, held closely by one family in each generation.

The ingredients are all natural and all the same as when the Carlsbad Oblaten was first perfected. Two thin wafer rounds, exactly 17.5 centimeters across, fused and filled with a delicate confection of pounded almonds, unsalted butter, powdered sugar, and natural flavorings. No preservatives are used or needed.

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The Original Carlsbad Oblaten remains a dessert delicacy whose flavor is as singular and distinctive as its history.

Coffee Charlotte / Kaffe Charlotte

A classic cake recipe found in the Danish International Food Encyclopedia “Menu” published by Lademann in 1976
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A charlotte is a type of dessert or trifle that can be served hot or cold. It can also be known as an “ice-box cake”. Bread, sponge cake or biscuits/cookies are used to line a mold, which is then filled with a fruit puree or custard. It can also be made using layers of breadcrumbs.

Classically, stale bread dipped in butter was used as the lining, but sponge cake or ladyfingers may be used today. The filling may be covered with a thin layer of similarly flavoured gelatin.

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Oat Biscuits / Havrekjeks

A traditional Norwegian biscuit recipe found on dinmat.no299_havrekjeks_post

It is a pity that these biscuits are almost only being made for Christmas here in Norway. It is absolutely delicious and tastes great with Norwegian goat cheese or any other cheese of your choice along with a nice cup of tea.

By the way, this recipe was also my guest post at Butter, Basil & Breadcumbs’s  Cookie Monday back in early February – Ted

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Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds Tuesday[4]TuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday[4]

Strawberry Dessert With Pimms No 1 / Jordbærdessert Med Pimms No 1

A spicy dessert recipe found on mytaste.no668_Jordbærdessert med Pimms No 1_post

The strawberries are really surprisingly good when they are marinate in the British summer drink Pimm’s No 1. If you don’t have Pimm’s it works fine with any other slightly fruity liquor as well.

Pickled ginger is used in many Asian dishes and provides an additional exciting touch to it all. And it is totally delicious to add a little crunchy biscuits. Recommended!

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Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds Tuesday[4]TuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday[4]