Kinafa – Traditional Lebanese Sweet Breakfast / Tradisjonelle Libanesiske Søt Frokokst

A popular Lebanese breakfast dish fould on sbs.com.auKinafa – Traditional Lebanese Sweet Breakfast / Tradisjonelle Libanesiske Søt Frokokst

Kinafa is a traditional Lebanese sweet that’s popular for breakfast, mainly on Sundays. Usually the whole family gathers to enjoy this warm dish for a lazy and rich breakfast.

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Loudoun’s Apple Pudding / Loudouns Eplepudding

An 18th centure dessert recipe found on evolutionarypie.com
Loudoun’s Apple Pudding / Loudouns Eplepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs https://revolutionarypie.com writes: John Campbell Loudoun’s apple pudding recipe first caught my eye because it was written in verse. A rarity today, rhyming recipes were common in the 19th and early 20th centuries, when they were supposedly used by housewives to help them remember recipes. Loudoun’s poem, attributed to him by Kristie Lynn and Robert Pelton, authors of The Early American Cookbook, is much older, dating back to the 18th century.

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Medieval Monday – Perre

A Medieval sidedish resipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
Medieval Monday_headingPerre_post

Take green peas, and boil them in a pot; And when they are broken, draw the broth a good quantity through a strainer into a pot, And sit it on the fire; and take onions and parsley, and hew them small together, And cast them thereto; And take powder of Cinnamon and pepper and cast thereto, and let boil; And take vinegar and powder of ginger, and cast thereto; And then take Saffron and salt, a little quantity, and cast thereto; And take fair pieces of pandemaine, or else of such tender bread, and cut it in fair morsels, and cast thereto; And serve it so forth.

From Harleian MS. 4016, Volume II

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New Bedford Flounder Roll-Ups / New Bedford Flyndre Rulader

A floudre recipe found in “Seafood ‘n Seaports – a Cook’s Tour of Massachusetts” published by Massachusetts Seafood Council in 1970
New Bedford Flounder Roll-Ups / New Bedford Flyndre Rulader

Flounder is one of my favourite kind of fish. It is great boiled, baked, fried, breaded or filled and rolled up like these – Ted

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Meatloaf Fifties Style / Femtitalls Kjøttbrød

A typical dinner recipe from “God Og Billig Hverdagsmat”
(Nice And Inexpensive Everyday Food)
published  by N W Damm & Sønn in 1955

Meatloaf Fifties Style / Femtitalls Kjøttbrød

There is a delightful simplicity to the recipes in this book, completely free of all the show off vanity one finds in particularly cook books from the late eithties and early nineties.

This is straightforward everyday food presented simply and honestly, just like the Scandinavian fifites themselves. The recipe is from one of my mother’s cook books, now mine, and I’m very fond of it – Ted

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Italian Fried Fish with Sage / Italiensk Stekt Fisk med Salvie

A delicious Italian fish recipe found in “The Best of
International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984

italian fried fish with sage_p0st

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Kedgeree Fishcakes / Kedgeree Fiskekaker

A spicy dinner recipe found on goodhousekeeping.com
Kedgeree fishcakes_post

These lightly curry spiced fish cakes are inspired by a classic Indian breakfast dish and can be made a day you have plenty of time and wait ready in the freezer when time is short and dinner needs to made in a hurry.

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Medieval Monday – 15th Century Gingerbread / 1400talls Krydderkake

A spicy cake recipe found on Tunspit & Table
Medieval Monday_heading14th Century Gingerbread_post

Kim who runs ‘Tunspit & Table‘ writes: The recipe is surprisingly straight forward, considering its age. It of course doesn’t give many quantities, but you can essentially spice it to taste. As to whether you should include ginger or not, I think that it’s a matter of personal preference, or you can do as I did and add ginger to half the recipe. I haven’t tried using sanders to colour the paste but it seems to be available online, or you can substitute it with a little food colouring.

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