Medieval Monday – Gridle Bread / Takkebrød

A recipe for ale rised bread found on CookIt!
Medieval Monday – Gridle Bread / Takkebrød

Bread was part of the staple diet in Medieval times. And this is a simple risen bread which uses ale (the yeast in the ale) to make the bread rise. The ale is warmed to activate the yeast.

Many early breads and biscuits were baked on flat metal pans, much as earlier peoples had cooked on flat stones. The heat from the griddle cooks the food.

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Focaccia with Rosemary and Onion / Focaccia med Rosmarin og Løk

A bread recipe found on “The Camping Cookbook”
published by Go Outdoors in 2016

Focaccia with Rosemary and Onion / Focaccia med Rosmarin og Løk

Bread is a real food staple yet so many people buy a loaf at the store, depriving themselves of the love, the smell and the sense of satisfaction that is baking. Making bread outside is just as easy as picking it up from the supermarket. All you need is a cast iron frying pan and some foil.

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18th Century Sippet Pudding / Sippet Pudding fra det 18de Århundre

A classic breadpudding recipe fond on  recipes.history.com
18th Century Sippet Pudding / Sippet Pudding fra det 18de Århundre

Bread pudding lovers will smack their lips at this recipe. Simple but hearty, it combines basic ingredients to make a dish that is rich and satisfying. The sauce is the crowning touch.

18th Century recipe

Cut a loaf of bread as thin as possible, put a layer of it on the bottom of a deep dish, strew on some slices of marrow or butter, with a handful of currant or stoned raisins; do this until the dish is full; let the currants or raisins be on top; beat four eggs, mix them with a quart of milk that has been boiled a little and become cold, a quarter of a pound of sugar, and a grated nutmeg — pour it in, and bake in a moderate oven — eat it with wine sauce.

— Randolph, Mary –  “The Virginia Housewife”

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Breakfast Sandwich with Fried Egg / Frokostsmørbrød med Speilegg

A delicious breakfast idea found on meny.no
Breakfast Sandwich with Fried Egg / Frokostsmørbrød med Speilegg

This is a sandwich perfect for a full breakfast! Buy half-baked bread and make a sandwich of fresh bread with aioli, Provence ham, finely chopped spring onions, cherry tomatoes and toped it all with a fried egg for each. Simple and fast breakfast, but very good.

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Club Sandwich with Cod / Club Sandwich med Torsk

A fresh take on the club sandwich found in
“Torsk til Hverdag  og Fest” (Cod for Everydays and Parties)
a free E-book published by
Godfisk!
Club Sandwich with Cod / Club Sandwich med Torsk

Cod is perfect for everyday life when time is scarce, the family is hungry and you need a healthy, quick and tasty dinner.

But cod is also great as party food. Put cod on the table when family or friends get together for a nice meal and a good mood is guaranteed. With its firm white fish meat and its delicate flavor, the cod fits just perfectly both for everydays and parties.

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Medieval Monday – Pokerounce

A historic sweatmeat recipe found on Cook It!
Medieval Monday – Pokerounce

A medieval sweetmeat to be eaten at the end of a meal. Sugar was an expensive luxury so honey sweetened foods were popular. The range of imported spices used would still have made this an expensive dish. Galingale is an aromatic spice, a little like ginger, but worth using if you can get it.

This dish is not unlike modern honey dishes which you might know, such as baklava.

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Easy Pizza Bread / Enkelt Pizzabrød

A baking recipe found in “Crisco’s Good Cooking  Made Easy Cook Book” published by Procter & Gamble co in 1978Easy Pizza Bread / Enkelt Pizzabrød

I love the title of this recipe, “Easy Pizza Bread”. It makes it sound like we’ve baked this kind of bread since times immemorial and here, finally, is a simple and easy to make it. On the other hand I’ve never heard of pizza bread before now

Ted
Winking smile

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Virginia Spoon Corn Bread / Maisskjebrød Fra Virginia

A bread recipe found in “War Time Recipes”
published by Proctor & Gamble Co in 1918

Virginia Spoon Corn Bread / Maisskjebrød Fra Virginia

Spoon bread, a classic Southern side dish, is actually more like a pudding than a bread. It’s so soft, it can be served – and eaten – with a spoon.

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The Search for the Perfect Toast

An article found on British Food: A History

Hot buttered toast must be the most popular British breakfast item, whether eaten on the run to the bus stop, or served up with a full English breakfast or posh scrambled eggs and smoked salmon on a Sunday. Elizabeth David described it as a ‘peculiarly English…delicacy’.

Full English Breakfast

It is true that the wafting smell of freshly made toast combined with the sight of the slow melting of a good covering of salted butter is so comforting. Indeed, the first thing offered up to you after you’ve come round from an operation on the NHS (and I unfortunately have had many times) is tea and toast. (Digressing slightly, the first thing offered up to you after an operation in the USA is the similarly comforting cookies and milk.)

Most toast today is, of course, made from flabby processed white sliced loaf, which produces quite depressingly poor ‘wangy’ toast. Proper toast requires proper bread; bread that has gone a slightly stale. Perfect toast is in the eye of the beholder: thick, thin, crisp throughout, soft in the centre, pale, dark, a scraping of butter or lashings of it.

Chorleywood processed white sliced loaf

Making toast was a way of using up stale bread, of course, so toast shouldn’t even be required now that we have the invention of Chorleywood processed bread. It’s ironic that our love of toast means we, on the whole, now make it with a product unsuitable for making it.

It won’t surprise you that there are some very detailed descriptions in old cookbooks as to the best way for making toast.

The earliest official piece of toasting equipment was the toasting fork. Here’s the flamboyant Victorian chef Alexis Soyer’s instructions from A Shilling Cookery for the People from 1854:

Alexis SoyerHow to Toast Bread – Procure a nice square loaf that had been baked one or two days previously, then with a sharp knife cut off the bottom crust evenly, and then as many sliced you require, about a quarter of an inch in thickness. Contrive to have a clear fire: place a slice of the bread upon a toasting-fork, about an inch from one of the sides, hold it a minute before the fire, then turn it, hold it another minute, by which time the bread will be thoroughly hot, then begin to move it gradually to and fro until the whole surface has assumed a yellowish-brown colour, then turn it again, toasting the other side in the same manner; lay it then upon a hot plate, have some fresh or salt butter (which must not be too hard, as pressing it upon the roast would make it heavy),spread a piece, rather less than an ounce, over, and cut the toast into four or six pieces. You will then have toast made to perfection.

toastin plateNext rung up on the evolutionary ladder of toast-making was the invention of the toast plate, a cast iron rack that could sit in front of coal-powered range cooker.

You can buy plates that lay over a gas burner on the stove top that would achieve a flavour closest to the ones found on the coal ranges. Elizabeth David owned one (from English Bread and Yeast Cookery, 1977):

Elizabeth DavidPart of the charm of the toast produced on this device is that every piece is different, and differently marked, irregularly chequered with the marks of the grill, charred here and there, flecked with brown and gold and black.

toasting plate for gas rangeAt home, the best way to make toast is by using a grill, preferably a gas grill; it produces a much more even heat and therefore even toasting than an electric grill. I love the flecked toast that David described, but an electric grill has hot spots that produce slices well done in one patch and hardly coloured in another.

NOTE: When the toasts are done, a toast rack is an essential. Just stacking them on top of each other is simply not the done thing.

Toast rack

Banana Bread / Bananbrød

A recipe for bread found in “The Farmers Family Baking Book”
a free E-book published by the Devondale Dairy
Banana Bread / Bananbrød

Put your overripe bananas to good use and make a loaf of banana bread. You’ll love this bread’s moist texture and simple flavor. Banana bread should form a crack down the center as it bakes–a sign the baking soda is doing its job. Serve toasted with a smear of cream cheese, greek yogurt, or peanut butter and top with mixed nuts. Your kids will love it.

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Norwegian Traditional Crispbread / Knekkebrød

A traditional baking recipe found in
“Cappelens Kokebok” published in 1995
Norwegian Traditional Crispbread / Knekkebrød

In the old days when it was difficult to keep the houses free of mice and rats, Norwegians often baked crispbread with holes in the middle so they could thread them on a long pole and hang them under the roof to keep them away from the rodents.

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Corn Bread / Maisbrød

A WWI baking recpe found in “War Time Recipes” published
by  Proctor & Gamble Co in 1918
Corn Bread / Maisbrød

When the United States entered World War I in 1917 food was desperately needed to supply the European civilian and military allies. Herbert Hoover was appointed as head of the U. S. Food Administration and launched a campaign to conserve food. Americans were urged to voluntarily stretch the food supply by cutting waste, substituting plentiful for scarce ingredients and participating in the food-conservation program popularly known as “Hooverizing,” which included wheatless Mondays and Wednesdays, meatless Tuesdays, and porkless Thursdays and Saturdays.

The Food Administration sponsored a program to educate the people about nutrition and food preservation to help persuade them that eating less would not be harmful. Signs and posters proclaimed, “Food Will Win the War” and pitched what became known as the “Doctrine of the Clean Plate.” The National War Garden Commission encouraged Americans to “put the slacker land to use” by growing war gardens and to preserve by canning and drying all the food they could not use while fresh.

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Oatmeal Bread / Havrebrød

A bread recipe found in “Borden’s Eagel Brand
Book of Recipes” published by Borden’s Condenced Milk Co
in the 1930s

Oatmeal Bread / Havrebrød

The people at Borden’s Condensed Milk Co obviously think we are all superbly accomplished bakers as they didn’t bother to mention neither oven temperature nor baking time in the recipe. I can’t say I feel all that sure about my accomplisment in the field of baking so I hope I’ll find help in similar recipes elsewhere on the net.

Ted
Winking smile

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Swedish Farmhouse Bread / Brød Fra Småland

A swedish bread recipe found in “Norsk Ukeblads Store Bakebok” (Norsk Ukeblad’s Big Bakingbook)  utgitt i 1984Swedish Farmhouse Bread / Brød Fra Småland

Swedish bread tends to be a bit on the sweet side and this bread will be too. It is a matter of taste of course and bread like this will suit some kinds of spreads better than others – Ted

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Almond Health Bread / Helsebrød med Mandler

A recipe found in “Almond Recipes for the well balanced menu” published by Blue Diamond Almonds Brand in 1916
Almond-Health-Bread_thumb2

This bread may not be considered as very healty in our day and age with all that sugar and molasses, but it does at least sound very tasty

Ted
Winking smile

If you want to download this book in pdf format
you can do that
HERE

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