Vegetable Pottage / Grønnsakssuppe

A everyday soup recipe for ordinary people
found on
cookit.e2bn.org
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People have eaten a lot of soup throughout the ages, ever since they had made the first cooking pots that would withstand heat. In Tudor times, it was still the main part of an ordinary person’s diet. It was basically a vegetable soup, flavoured with herbs and thickened with oats. 

Ordinary people would not have been able to afford much meat, so they would rely on this soup as their staple diet together with bread and cheese. Occasionally meat bones or fish would be added when available.

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Frikassé On Smoked Pork Knuckle / Frikassé På Røkt Svineknoke

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
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This traditional Norwegian dish is incredibly delicious winter food! Pork knuckle is very easy to prepare and if you cook the knuckle the night before you’ll use max 20 minutes to cook this delicious dinner.

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Felfel Bil Roz – Egyptian Stuffed Peppers / Egyptiske Fylte Paprika

A classic Egyptian recipe from “God Mat Fra Hele Verden” (Delicious Food From All The World) published by Schibsted in 1971
Felfel Bil Roz – Egyptian Stuffed Peppers / Egyptiske Fylte Paprika

Stuffed vegetables are known from throughout the Balkans and most other places in the Middle East. Here’s the Egyptian version.

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Rice Ring With Curry Fish / Risrand med Karry-fisk

 A spicy fish dish recipe found in “Ris & Pasta” (Rice & Pasta)
published by Lademann in 1978
Rice Ring With Curry Fish / Risrand med Karry-fisk
It may look Indian, but it is as Danish as a freshly baked pastry  😉

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Settlers’ Casserole / Nybyggergryte

A dinner recipe found in “Gryteretter” (Casseroles)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979

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Pork Knuckle with Mashed Rutabaga / Svinekoke med Kålrotstappe

A classic Norwegian dinner recipe found in “Gode Gamle Oppskrifter” (Good Old Recipes) published by Gyldendal in 1991
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This classic Norwegian dish is typical what the English would call cottage cooking. It’s made from an inexpensive but very tasty piece of meat and an inexpensive vegetable. Besides in the old days anyone with a bit of land would grow their own rutbaga.

Pork knuckle is often just called knuckles in Norway. Others again call them ham knuckles. But all the names mean the same thing, the short piece between the ham and the trotters.

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Medieval Monday – Savoury Rice Pudding / Velsmakende Rispudding

A rice recipe from 1390 found on theguardian.com
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Rice might be commonplace today, but once it was an expensive import found only on the tables of kings. This dish – unlike its modern cousin – is unsweetened and cooked with beef broth

Cookery writer Dorothy Hartley wrote in Food in England (1954) that “East End women make a rice pudding using broth … when cooked it is finished under the joint of Mutton.” This is very similar to the “Ryse of Flesh” recipe found in The Forme of Cury (1390):

Take Ryse and waishe hem clene. And do hem in erthen pot with gode broth and lat hem seeþ wel. Afterward take Almaund mylke and do þer to. And colour it wiþ safroun an salt, an messe forth.

The Forme of Cury, ed. Samual Pegge, c.1390

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Mussel Brose / Blåskjellsuppe

A classic Scotish mussel soup recipe found in
“The Cooking of The British Isles” published in 1970

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Mussel Brose or Mussel Broth is a regional dish of Scotland. The word ‘Brose’ was used to mean a thick broth or old-fashioned potage. In Scotland the most common thickener was oatmeal. 

Scotland has very famous mussel beds, producing some of the finest mussels in the world, and if you can source fresh mussels from Scotland they will be wonderful in this broth.

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Cold Hen with Herb Dressing / Kald Høne med Urtedressing

A great cold summer dish found in “Alt om Urter”
(all About Herbs) published by Den Norske Bokklubb in 1985
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A delightful dish for people with a herb garden, a henhouse and hippie tendencies. I’ve had my share of dishes like this back in the late seventies early eighties when the smallholding dream hit my generation in full force. It did not last, they soon missed the latte and the sushi and headed back for the bright lights and the big city and became yuppies instead. Typical of the Scandinavian baby boom generation born in the fifties and early sixties, always searching for something else – Ted  😉

Note: My rambling comments are no critic of the dish itself, it is absolutely delicious. Besides, who am I to talk, I’m part of that baby boom generation myself  😀

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Bacon Chicken / Baconkylling

A chicken recipe found in “Fjærkre” (Poultry) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

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In my eyes. bacon and chicken is as close to a match made
in heaven as you can get – Ted 😉

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Oxtail Soup from Belgium / Oksehalesuppe fra Belgia

A classic recipe found in “Supper og Sauser” (Soups and Sauces)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

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Oxtail (occasionally spelled ox tail or ox-tail) is the culinary name for the tail of cattle. Formerly, it referred only to the tail of an ox or steer, a castrated male. An oxtail typically weighs 2 to 4 lbs. (1–1.8 kg) and is skinned and cut into short lengths for sale.

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The History of Bovril

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000_bovril_08Bovril is the trademarked name of a thick, salty meat extract, developed in the 1870s by John Lawson Johnston. It is sold in a distinctive, bulbous jar. Bovril is made in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire; owned and distributed by Unilever UK.

Bovril can be made into a drink by diluting with hot water, or less commonly, with milk. It can be used as a flavouring for soups, stews or porridge, or spread on bread, especially on toast in a similar fashion to Marmite and Vegemite.

History

In 1870, in the Franco-Prussian War, Napoleon III ordered one million cans of beef to feed his troops. The task of providing all this beef went to a Scotsman living in Canada named John Lawson Johnston. Large quantities of beef were available across the British Dominions and South America, but its transport and storage were problematic. Therefore, Johnston created a product known as ‘Johnston’s Fluid Beef’, later called Bovril, to meet the needs of Napoleon III. By 1888, over 3,000 UK public houses, grocers and dispensing chemists were selling Bovril. In 1889, the Bovril Company was formed.

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Bovril continued to function as a “war food” in World War I and was frequently mentioned in the 1930 account “Not So Quiet… Stepdaughters of War” by Helen Zenna Smith (Evadne Price). One 000_bovril_04account from the book describes it being prepared for the casualties at Mons where “the orderlies were just beginning to make Bovril for the wounded, when the bearers and ambulance wagons were shelled as they were bringing the wounded into the hospital”.

A thermos of beef tea was the favoured way to fend off the chill of winter matches for generations of British football enthusiasts; to this day, Bovril dissolved in hot water is sold in stadiums all over the United Kingdom. Bovril beef tea was the main warm drink that Ernest Shackleton’s team had to drink when they were marooned on Elephant Island during the Endurance Expedition.

000_bovril_06When John Lawson Johnston died, his son George Lawson Johnston inherited and took over the Bovril business. In 1929, George Lawson Johnston was created Baron Luke, of Pavenham, in the county of Bedford.

Bovril’s instant beef stock was launched in 1966 and its “King of Beef” range of instant flavours for stews, casseroles and gravy in 1971. In 1971, Cavenham Foods acquired the Bovril Company but then sold most of its dairies and South American operations to finance further take-overs. The brand is now owned by Unilever.

Bovril holds the unusual position of having been advertised with a Pope. An advertising campaign of the early 20th century in Britain depicted Pope Leo XIII seated on his throne, bearing a mug of Bovril. The campaign slogan read: The Two Infallible Powers – The Pope & Bovril (See picture #2 at the top of the post).

Cultural significance

Since its invention, Bovril has become an icon of British culture. It is commonly associated with football culture, since during the winter British football fans (mainly in local league level or division two) in stadium terraces often drink it from thermoses (or disposable cups in Scotland, where thermoses are banned from football stadiums).’

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During a 2011 episode of Top Gear, James May drank from an urn of Bovril while driving a snowplough in Norway and commented: “We all know that when it’s snowing and it’s cold you have Bovril. That’s a rule of life.” Bovril reappeared in another episode of Top Gear in the form of Jeremy Clarkson’s V8 Food Blender, wherein it was used to make a “Man’s V8 Smoothie” complete with raw beef and brick.

Text from Wikipedia

A Roman Fish Soup / En Romersk Fiskesuppe

A recipe from “Fra canard à l’orange til ris à la Carte”
a book in the “Gourmet – om god vin og festelig mad”
series published in 1978
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This recipe is obviously based on an old one from Roman times and is pretty freely interpreted. I can see several types of seafood in the picture that is not mentioned in the recipe, for instance squid and shrimps so I guess it is a type of use what you got kind of fish soup which seems reasonably enough. Most seafood is delicious anyway – Ted

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Boneless Birds / Benløse fugle

A classic Scandinavian meat dish found on familiejournal.dk544_benløse fugler_post

Boneless Birds is a classic meat dish you will find in different variations all over Scandinavia. The dish once called “The poor man’s bird” has unfortunately fallen out of fashion and is seldom on people’s menus to day. This rather luxurious version of the dish is Danish.

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Recipe posted at:
FoodieFridays_buttonpurebloglove_smallfiestafriday

Burning Love / Brennende Kjærlighet

A nice variation on mashed potatoes found on frukt.no246_brennende kjærlighet_post

Burning love consists of mashed potato with grated cheese and broth, served with roasted mushroom, bacon, leeks and chives. Quick, easy and very, very good!

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Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds Tuesday[4]TuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday[4]