Norwegian Sunshine Buns / Solskinnsboller

A bun recipe found in “Den Store Bakeboken”
(The Big Baking Book) published by Schibstedt in 1978
Norwegian Sunshine Buns / Solskinnsboller

In Northern Norway, these are usually called just “Solboller”
(Sun Buns) and they are eaten  at the end of the dark winter
to celebrate that the sun has returned.

You might have seen other recipes for Norwegian
Sunshine Buns, there is a multitude of them
out there. I’ve even posted at least one earlier – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge norwegian_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Advertisements

Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

A classic Norwegian bun recipe found on tine.no
Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

Nothing tastes better than fresh yeast bakery. It does not have to be a special occasion, these buns can be enjoyed fresh any day or you can freeze them and serve them should you get unexpected guests. You get about 20 buns from this recipe.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge norwegian_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

A delicious cake recipe found in “Mine Lekreste Kaker”
(My Sweetest Cakes) published by Teknisk Forlag in 1994

Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

Maybe not the most traditional of buns, at least not seen with Norwegian eyes, but who cares they look absolutely delicious.

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_077000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Earl Grey Teacakes / Earl Grey Teboller

A delicious bun recipe found on bbcgoodfood.com
Earl Grey Teacakes / Earl Grey Teboller

Fruit buns flavoured with aromatic tea and orange to be served toasted with lashings of butter.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Bath Buns / Bath Boller

A 17th century bun recipe found on telegraph.co.uk
bath buns_telegraph_post

Rich Bath buns with a sweet sugar glaze were a favourite of Jane Austen – though apparently it was easy to over-do it.

From a recipe from Mrs Raffald’s “The Experienced English Housekeeper” published in 1769. Mrs Raffald tells us to “send them in hot for breakfast”, which sounds rather indigestible for these rich, buttery buns, and may have been why, when Jane was staying with a rather mean aunt, she joked to Cassandra that she would make herself an inexpensive guest by “disordering my stomach with Bath buns”.

000_recipe_eng  traditional badge literature  000_recipe_nor

Pineapple Pastels / Ananas Pasteller

A delicious filled bun recipe found on sbs.com.auPineapple pastels_sbs-com-au_post

Hailing from the northern Philippine island of Camiguin, these soft, golden brioche buns are filled with a rich and sweet pineapple-flavoured custard.

000_recipe_eng  traditional badge ethnic speciality_flat  000_recipe_nor

Lobster Lunch / Hummer Lunsj

A fancy lunch recipe found on godt.no
lobster roll_godt_post

This is simply a small lobster sandwich. It’s nice fresh bread stuffed with homemade lobster salad; You use good quality hot dog buns or halved baguettes and a fully cooked lobster.

The most complicated part of this dish is to clean the boiled lobster; if you have not done this before, it is quite amazing how much fumbling it might take to get it done  😉

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

The History of Hot Dogs

hotdog_01

To most of us, hot dogs are intrinsically linked with the USA and baseball, but as with many foods, where they end up being the most popular doesn’t necessarily prove their origins.

What is a Hot Dog?

hotdog_03In most parts of the world, the term “hot dog” refers to a cooked, smoled, or cured sausage served in 0a soft long roll with or without relishes. The type of sausage is of some importance in order to call what you’re eating a  “hot dog”.  They are usually frankfurters, also known as Franks, Wieners, Weenies, Dachshunds, Wiener Würstchen, or Frankfurter Würstel.  Also, the bread in which the frankfurter is sold should be a long roll so that the sausage is (mostly) encased in the bread.

Now, some may disagree with the above definition, preferring to refer to just the sausage as a hot dog, however if that were the case then certainly, they were not invented in the USA .

hotdog_06Although the Frankfurter is thought to get its name from Frankfurt in Germany, there are also claims that the sausage known as a “dachshund” or “little-dog” was created in the late 1600’s by Johann Georghehner in Coburg, Germany. However, Frankfurt defends their claim, so much so that in 1987 its  500th birthday was celebrated in Frankfurt.

To muddy the waters even further, Vienna (Wien) in Austria also lays claim to the invention,  using the term “wiener” to prove Vienna as the birthplace of the sausage.

Who Invented the Hot Dog

hotdog_02Assuming our definition of what a hot dog is is accepted, the term “hot dog” was first coined in 1901 at the New York Polo Grounds. The story goes that on a cold day in April,  a man called Harry Stevens was losing money trying to sell ice cream and ice cold soda so he sent his staff out to buy  all the dachshund sausages they could find, together with an equal number of rolls and began selling them  from hotdog_05portable hot water tanks with the hawkers attracting customers by shouting  “Get your dachshund sausages while they’re red hot!”

A sports cartoonist called Tad Dorgan upon hearing the sellers,  drew a cartoon of dachschund sausages in rolls barking like dogs and as he wasn’t sure of the spelling of “dachshund” he just put in the caption “hot dog!”  The cartoon was a hit and the term “hot dog” was born.

hotdog_07The hot dog in a long bun as it is today,  is attributed to a Bavarian concessionaire, Anton Feuchtwanger who introduced it   in 1904 during the St. Louis “Louisiana Purchase Exposition”.  The story goes that he initially loaned white gloves to his customers to hold his hot sausages however, when most of the gloves weren’t returned,  his brother-in-law who was a baker,  made up long soft rolls to hold the sausages.

So, depending on your definition of what a hot dog is, it’s either definitely American or of indeterminate origin.

Pistachio Buns / Pistasjeboller

A great recipe for filled buns found on tine.no
228_Pistasjeboller_post

Imagine fresh, hot and juicy buns. Now, imagine also that you fill them with a lovely, sweet filling flavoured with pistachios. Lovely, huh? Now your those thoughts can become reality with this recipe for some fantastic delicious pistachio buns. Enjoy – Ted 🙂

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

Mahamri – Swahili Coconut Buns / Swahili Kokosboller

An East African speciality found on about.com/food/Mahamri - Swahili Coconut Buns_aboutfood_post

traditional badge ethnic speciality_flatMahamri are a sweetly spiced East African coconut doughnut. There is a great level of confusion concerning what mahamri really are, and whether they are in essence the same as mandazi. In fact, when it all boils down to the technicalities of fried dough, they are essentially the same as mandazi.

The difference is that they have added fragrant spices, or coconut or both of these at times. After all, fried dough is fried dough whether it is spiced, salted or plain. Yet, the nuances are to be respected.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

The Chelsea Bun House

The Bun House in Chelsea

The old Chelsea Bun House was a shop in Chelsea which sold buns in the 18th century. It was famous for its Chelsea bun and also did a great trade in hot cross buns at Easter. It was patronised by royalty such as Kings George II, George III and their family.

History

The Bun House i Chelsea - Interior

It was on Jew’s Row, by Grosvenor Row, on the main road from Pimlico to Chelsea, near Ranelagh Gardens. It seems to have started business early in the 18th century as Jonathan Swift wrote in his journal to Stella on 28 April 1711:

Jonathan Swift by Charles Jervas - detailA fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns sold here in our town; was it not Rare Chelsea buns? I bought one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not like it, as the man said, &c.

Over a hundred years later, Sir Richard Phillips wrote in A Morning’s Walk from London to Kew:

Sir Richard PhillipsBefore me appeared the shops so famed for Chelsea buns, which, for above thirty years, I have never passed without filling my pockets. In the original of these shops, for even of Chelsea buns there are counterfeits, are preserved mementos of domestic events, in the first half of the past century. The bottle-conjuror is exhibited in a toy of his own age; portraits are also displayed of Duke William and other noted personages; a model of a British soldier, in the stiff costume of the same age; and some grotto-works, serve to indicate the taste of a former owner, and were perhaps intended to rival the neighbouring exhibition at Don Saltero’s. These buns have afforded a competency, and even wealth; to four generations of the same family; and it is singular, that their delicate flavour, lightness and richness, have never been successfully imitated. The present proprietor told me, with exultation, that George the Second had often been a customer of the shop; that the present King, when Prince George, and often during his reign, had stopped and purchased his buns; and that the Queen, and all the Princes and Princesses, had been among his occasional customers.

The family to which he referred was the Hand family who had succeeded David Loudon as proprietors. Richard Hand was known as “Captain Bun”. His wife, Mrs. Hand, ran the business after his death. QueenCaroline - 1820Queen Caroline, who had brought her children there, presented Mrs. Hand with a silver mug containing five guineas. Upon her death, her son ran the business and he also supplied butter to local customers. When he died too, his older brother took over. He was a retired soldier — a poor knight of Windsor — and, like his brother, was eccentric. There were no more Hands so, on his death in 1839, the property reverted to the Crown and the contents were auctioned off.

Easter

The Bun House in ChelseaOn Good Friday, it was a tradition for the working classes, such as servants and apprentices, to buy a hot cross bun. The Greenwich Fair was the most well-known Easter fair in London, but great crowds would also assemble on the Five Fields — an open space which was subsequently developed as Eaton and Belgrave Squares to form Belgravia. The bun house would open for business as early as three or four in the morning and the crowds would press on it so fiercely that buns would only be sold through openings in the shutters. Constables were required to keep good order and, in 1792, the crowd was so great that Mrs Hand made a public announcement that there would be no sales of hot cross buns in the following year,

Royal Bun House, Chelsea, Good Friday

No Cross Buns.

Mrs. Hand respectfully informs her friends and the public, that in consequence of the great concourse of people which assembled before her house at a very early hour, on the morning of Good Friday last, by which her neighbours (with whom she has always lived in friendship and repute) have been much alarmed and annoyed; it having also been intimated, that to encourage or countenance a tumultuous assembly at this particular period might be attended with consequences more serious than have hitherto been apprehended; desirous, therefore, of testifying her regard and obedience to those laws by which she is happily protected, she is determined, though much to her loss, not to sell Cross Buns on that day to any person whatever, but Chelsea buns as usual.

This restraint did not last and so, on its final Good Friday of 1839, the bun house sold almost quarter of a million hot cross buns.

Chelsea Buns / Chelsea Boller

A classic baking recipefoomd in Good Housekeeping’s
“Cookery Book” published in 1976

chelsea buns_post

traditional badge british_flatThe Chelsea bun is a type of currant bun that was first created in the 18th century at the Bun House in Chelsea, an establishment favoured by Hanoverian royalty, which was demolished in 1839.

The bun is made of a rich yeast dough flavoured with lemon peel, cinnamon or mixed spice. Prior to being rolled into a square spiral shape the dough is spread with a mixture of currants, brown sugar and butter. The process of making this bun is very similar to that involved in producing the cinnamon roll. After being cooked traditionally the chelsea bun is glazed with cold water and honey. It is glazed while still hot so the water evaporates and leaves the honey, making the bun much sweeter.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

Kapuziner Puffs / Kapuzinere

A recipe for some delicious small Danish puffs found in
the international food encyclopedia “Menu” published by
Lademann in 1976

kapuzinere_post

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_dan

Saffron Buns with Custard / Safranboller med Vaniljekrem

A delicious juicy bun recipe found on godt.no
Safranboller med vaniljekrem_godt_post

Yeast baking with saffron looks great and smells wonderful and is certainly not reserved just for “lussekatter” the traditionally Scandinavian cakes made for Saint Lucy’s Day. Here you got big round saffron buns filled with custard. The taste of saffron and vanilla goes very well together, so this is a very successful combination.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

What A Spread / For En Oppdekking

A series of recipes from an ad for Fleichmann’s Yeast
published in Catelaine magazine in 1958
bread_Chatelaine mag_fleishmanns yeast_1958_post

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor