Buns From Suldal in Southern Norway / Suldalsboller

An traditional bun recipe found on jaerbladet.no
Buns From Suldal in Southern Norway / Suldalsboller000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

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Norwegian Cinnamon Buns – Basic Recipe / Kanelboller Grunnoppskrift

A recipe for classic cinnamon buns found on melk.no
Norwegian Cinnamon Buns – Basic Recipe / Kanelboller Grunnoppskrift

Cinnamon buns or cinnamon swirls – a loved treat has many names. One thing is for sure: Fresh baked cinnamon buns are among the most delicious things you can sink your teeth into.

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Apricot Buns / Aprikosboller

A recipe for filled buns found in “Norske Ukeblads Store Bakebok” (Norsk Ukeblad’s Big Baking Book) published in1984
Apricot Buns / Aprikosboller

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Traditional Norwegian Suldal’s Buns / Tradisjonelle Suldalsboller

A traditional bun recipe from Suldal in Southern Norway
found in Jærbladet’s
recipe pages

Traditional Norwegian Suldal’s Buns / Tradisjonelle Suldalsboller

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Cheese Buns / Osteboller

A delicious cheesy bun recipe found on godt.no
Cheese Buns / Osteboller

These cheese buns are made with three types of cheese: they are filled with a nice piece of mozzarella and then sprinkled with grated cheddar and parmesan. The great flavor also comes from the fact that the dough for the cheese buns contains both butter, olive oil, salt and garlic powder. In addition, the buns should be brushed with a mixture of melted butter, garlic powder and fresh oregano after baking.

Mmm-m-m, as you see, these buns are flavourful stuff, the taste is amazing! Serve the cheese buns while they are still hot and fresh, with the cheese inside still soft and delicious.

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Norwegian Sunshine Buns / Solskinnsboller

A bun recipe found in “Den Store Bakeboken”
(The Big Baking Book) published by Schibstedt in 1978
Norwegian Sunshine Buns / Solskinnsboller

In Northern Norway, these are usually called just “Solboller”
(Sun Buns) and they are eaten  at the end of the dark winter
to celebrate that the sun has returned.

You might have seen other recipes for Norwegian
Sunshine Buns, there is a multitude of them
out there. I’ve even posted at least one earlier – Ted

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Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

A classic Norwegian bun recipe found on tine.no
Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

Nothing tastes better than fresh yeast bakery. It does not have to be a special occasion, these buns can be enjoyed fresh any day or you can freeze them and serve them should you get unexpected guests. You get about 20 buns from this recipe.

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Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

A delicious cake recipe found in “Mine Lekreste Kaker”
(My Sweetest Cakes) published by Teknisk Forlag in 1994

Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

Maybe not the most traditional of buns, at least not seen with Norwegian eyes, but who cares they look absolutely delicious.

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Earl Grey Teacakes / Earl Grey Teboller

A delicious bun recipe found on bbcgoodfood.com
Earl Grey Teacakes / Earl Grey Teboller

Fruit buns flavoured with aromatic tea and orange to be served toasted with lashings of butter.

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Bath Buns / Bath Boller

A 17th century bun recipe found on telegraph.co.uk
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Rich Bath buns with a sweet sugar glaze were a favourite of Jane Austen – though apparently it was easy to over-do it.

From a recipe from Mrs Raffald’s “The Experienced English Housekeeper” published in 1769. Mrs Raffald tells us to “send them in hot for breakfast”, which sounds rather indigestible for these rich, buttery buns, and may have been why, when Jane was staying with a rather mean aunt, she joked to Cassandra that she would make herself an inexpensive guest by “disordering my stomach with Bath buns”.

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Pineapple Pastels / Ananas Pasteller

A delicious filled bun recipe found on sbs.com.auPineapple pastels_sbs-com-au_post

Hailing from the northern Philippine island of Camiguin, these soft, golden brioche buns are filled with a rich and sweet pineapple-flavoured custard.

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Lobster Lunch / Hummer Lunsj

A fancy lunch recipe found on godt.no
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This is simply a small lobster sandwich. It’s nice fresh bread stuffed with homemade lobster salad; You use good quality hot dog buns or halved baguettes and a fully cooked lobster.

The most complicated part of this dish is to clean the boiled lobster; if you have not done this before, it is quite amazing how much fumbling it might take to get it done  😉

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The History of Hot Dogs

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To most of us, hot dogs are intrinsically linked with the USA and baseball, but as with many foods, where they end up being the most popular doesn’t necessarily prove their origins.

What is a Hot Dog?

hotdog_03In most parts of the world, the term “hot dog” refers to a cooked, smoled, or cured sausage served in 0a soft long roll with or without relishes. The type of sausage is of some importance in order to call what you’re eating a  “hot dog”.  They are usually frankfurters, also known as Franks, Wieners, Weenies, Dachshunds, Wiener Würstchen, or Frankfurter Würstel.  Also, the bread in which the frankfurter is sold should be a long roll so that the sausage is (mostly) encased in the bread.

Now, some may disagree with the above definition, preferring to refer to just the sausage as a hot dog, however if that were the case then certainly, they were not invented in the USA .

hotdog_06Although the Frankfurter is thought to get its name from Frankfurt in Germany, there are also claims that the sausage known as a “dachshund” or “little-dog” was created in the late 1600’s by Johann Georghehner in Coburg, Germany. However, Frankfurt defends their claim, so much so that in 1987 its  500th birthday was celebrated in Frankfurt.

To muddy the waters even further, Vienna (Wien) in Austria also lays claim to the invention,  using the term “wiener” to prove Vienna as the birthplace of the sausage.

Who Invented the Hot Dog

hotdog_02Assuming our definition of what a hot dog is is accepted, the term “hot dog” was first coined in 1901 at the New York Polo Grounds. The story goes that on a cold day in April,  a man called Harry Stevens was losing money trying to sell ice cream and ice cold soda so he sent his staff out to buy  all the dachshund sausages they could find, together with an equal number of rolls and began selling them  from hotdog_05portable hot water tanks with the hawkers attracting customers by shouting  “Get your dachshund sausages while they’re red hot!”

A sports cartoonist called Tad Dorgan upon hearing the sellers,  drew a cartoon of dachschund sausages in rolls barking like dogs and as he wasn’t sure of the spelling of “dachshund” he just put in the caption “hot dog!”  The cartoon was a hit and the term “hot dog” was born.

hotdog_07The hot dog in a long bun as it is today,  is attributed to a Bavarian concessionaire, Anton Feuchtwanger who introduced it   in 1904 during the St. Louis “Louisiana Purchase Exposition”.  The story goes that he initially loaned white gloves to his customers to hold his hot sausages however, when most of the gloves weren’t returned,  his brother-in-law who was a baker,  made up long soft rolls to hold the sausages.

So, depending on your definition of what a hot dog is, it’s either definitely American or of indeterminate origin.

Pistachio Buns / Pistasjeboller

A great recipe for filled buns found on tine.no
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Imagine fresh, hot and juicy buns. Now, imagine also that you fill them with a lovely, sweet filling flavoured with pistachios. Lovely, huh? Now your those thoughts can become reality with this recipe for some fantastic delicious pistachio buns. Enjoy – Ted 🙂

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Mahamri – Swahili Coconut Buns / Swahili Kokosboller

An East African speciality found on about.com/food/Mahamri - Swahili Coconut Buns_aboutfood_post

traditional badge ethnic speciality_flatMahamri are a sweetly spiced East African coconut doughnut. There is a great level of confusion concerning what mahamri really are, and whether they are in essence the same as mandazi. In fact, when it all boils down to the technicalities of fried dough, they are essentially the same as mandazi.

The difference is that they have added fragrant spices, or coconut or both of these at times. After all, fried dough is fried dough whether it is spiced, salted or plain. Yet, the nuances are to be respected.

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