Swedish Cabbage Casserole / Svensk Kålgryta

A classic Swedish dinner recipe found on godmat.org
Swedish Cabbage Casserole / Svensk Kålgryta

A real autumn dish that is both cheap and easy to prepare. Very  simple to convert to cabbage soup by increasing the spice, broth and water volume. If you have the time,  shape the minced meat into small meatballs.

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Winter Salad / Vintersalat

A salad recipe found in “Mat for Alle” (Food for Everyone)
Published by Tiden Norske Forlag in 1985
Winter Salad / Vintersalat

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Winter Stew / Vintergryte

A filling stew found in “Lammekjøtt” (Lamb)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981

Winter Stew / Vintergryte

Root vegetables, cabbage, onion and lamb and hot spices. With rice as an accessory, this becomes a vitamin bomb when you need it most.

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Traditional Norwegian Barley Soup / Grynsodd

A classic Norwegian farmhouse recipe found in
“Gode, Gamle Oppskrifter” (Delicious Old Recipes)
published by Gyldendal in 1991

Traditional Norwegian Barley Soup / Grynsodd

A tempting soup with plenty of rutabaga, carrot, cabbage and potatoes. And with small pieces of meat as “spice”.

If you use vegetable broth instead of beef broth in this soup, it will make first-rate vegetarian food. The combination of whole barley, vegetables and potatoes is perfect. Serve it with bread and you have a full meal.

If you want the soup thicker, more like a stew, you just add a little more barley and more potatoes and vegetables.

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Traditional Swedish Cabbage Soup / Tradisjonell Skånsk Kålsuppe

A traditional recipe from Sweden’s southernmost landscape found in “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance) published by Cappelen in 1991

Traditional Swedish Cabbage Soup / Tradisjonell Skånsk Kålsuppe

Nordic cookbook history was written in 1974. That year a bunch of Swedish foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, Carl Butler’s Cookbook. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato sauce and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of herbal spices and garlic it can be found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and paté on our tables.

For all Scandinavians who like me love that cook book it took 17 years before we could hurry to the book shops to buy the continuance. It was simply called “Carl Butler’s Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance). This recipe is from that book – Ted

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Russian Borsht / Russisk Borsht

A classic Russian dish found in “New Fashion Plates for Your Menu” published by Planters Edible Oil Co in 1932Russian Borsht / Russisk Borsht

Borsjtsj is a traditional dish in Eastern Europe, consisting of a vegetable soup, where the main ingredient usually is beetroot, while the other ingredients may vary. It is assumed that it originally originates from Ukraine.

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A Short History of Sauerkraut

The History of Sauerkraut
Contemporary Chinese sour cabbage

Although sauerkraut – German for “sour cabbage” – is thought of as a German invention, Chinese laborers building the Great Wall of China over 2,000 years ago ate it as standard fare. Chinese sauerkraut, made from shredded cabbage fermented in rice wine.

Most likely it was brought to Europe 1000 years later by Gengis Kahn after plundering China.

The History of Sauerkraut
Gengis Kahn

Although in Germany instead of using the wine they dry cured it by sprinkling salt on the shredded cabbage. The water is then drawn out of the cabbage to make the juice that you see that accompanies the kraut.

The History of Sauerkraut
Typical German dish with sauerkraut

The History of SauerkrautThe Dutch, who were great sea-fearing traders used sauerkraut on their ships as it did not need refrigeration and helped prevent scurvy.

Today’s sauerkraut is made by combining shredded cabbage, salt and sometimes spices, and allowing the mixture to ferment. It can be purchased in jars and cans in supermarkets. Fresh sauerkraut is sold in delicatessens and in plastic bags in a supermarket’s refrigerated section. The History of SauerkrautIt should be rinsed before being used in casseroles, as a side dish and even on sandwiches like the famous Reuben Sandwich. Sauerkraut is an excellent source of vitamin C as well as of some of the B vitamins.

There is a theory that the Tartars introduced the acid cabbage from the Orient into eastern Europe, and from there kraut went to Germany, Alsace-Lorraine, and France.

Chinese Style Steamed Halibut with Cabbage / Kokt Kveite på Kinesisk Vis

A Chinese style lunch recipe found in “Internasjonale Retter med Norsk Fisk” (International dishes with Norwegian Fish) published
by Wennergren – Cappelen in 1987

Chinese Style Steamed Halibut with Cabbage / Kokt Kveite på Kinesisk Vis

A Chinese steamer like the one on the picture is a great addition to any kitchen and can be used to steam just about anything. Rise, fish,
vegetables, shelfish, you name it. If you haven’t already got one,
go get one.

Ted
Winking smile

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Homemade Stewed Cabbage / Hjemmelaget Stuet Kål

A classic Norwegian side dish recipe found on frukt.no
Homemade Stewed Cabbage / Hjemmelaget Stuet Kål

Stewed cabbage is a classic Norwegian side dish that you easily make yourself. It is usually served with meat balls, dinner sausages and any sort of smoked meat.

You can buy packages of half finished stewed cabbage (cooked, dried cabbage flakes and the dry ingredients for the sauce) at most grocers here in Norway, but the result is nothing compared with what you get if you cook stewed cabbage from scratch yourself.

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Bindae Duk – Korean Mung Pancakes / Koreanske Mungbønnepannekaker

A Korean pancake recipe found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise”
(A Culinary Voyage) published by Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987

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Small, crispy fried pancakes made of ground mung beans with diced ham and kim chee is a tasty appetizer served with flavorings such as chilisauce and soy sauce. They can be eaten both hot and cold.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 23

The Christmas Recipes – Part 23

Reindeer Steak With Baked Red Cabbage & Parsnip Purée / Reinsdyrstek Med Ovnsbakt Rødkål & Pastinakkpuré

Reindeer Steak With Baked Red Cabbage & Parsnip Purée / Reinsdyrstek Med Ovnsbakt Rødkål & Pastinakkpuré

Anise Toffees / Aniskarameller

Anise Toffees / Aniskarameller

Danish Pork Roast with Browned Potatoes / Dansk Svinestek med Brunede Poteter

A classic Danish dinner recipe found in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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If you’ve never tried to brown potatoes like the Danish do you’re
in for a real treat. They are absolutely delicious.

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Cured Ham with Summer Cabbage / Spekeskinke med Sommerkål

A classic Norwegian summer dinner found on matprat.no
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Cured meats for dinner has long-standing traditions in Norway. Along with potatoes, cabbage, scrambled eggs or other nice vegetables, it leaves you both satisfied and happy.

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Traditional Irish Bacon, Cabbage, and Parsley Sauce / Tradisjonell Irsk Bacon, Kål og Persillesaus

A classic Irish dish found on marthastewart.com610_Traditional Irish Bacon, Cabbage, and Parsley Sauce_post

Irish bacon with cabbage is the original, quintessential St. Patrick’s Day dish. This version, which includes a mouthwatering parsley sauce, is from “Forgotten Skills of Cooking” by Darina Allen.

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Old Fashioned Chocolate Fudge / Gammeldags Amerikansk Sjokoladefudge

A sweet recipe found in “Hershey Favourite Recipes”
published in 1937
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Origin of Fudge

traditional badge americanAmerican-style fudge (containing chocolate) is found in a letter written by Emelyn Battersby Hartridge, a student at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. She wrote that her schoolmate’s cousin made fudge in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1886 and sold it for 40 cents a pound. Hartridge obtained the fudge recipe and, in 1888, made 30 lb (14 kg) of fudge for the Vassar College Senior Auction. This Vassar fudge recipe became quite popular at the school for years to come.

000_fudgeWord of this popular confectionery spread to other women’s colleges. For example, Wellesley College and Smith College have their own versions of a fudge recipe dating from the late 19th or early 20th century.

In the late 19th century, shops on Mackinac Island in Michigan began to produce similar products for summer vacationers. Fudge is still produced in some of the original shops on Mackinac Island and the surrounding area. Mackinac Island Fudge ice cream, a vanilla ice cream with chunks of fudge blended in, is also very common in this region and across the United States.