Split Pea & Ham Soup / Gul Ertesuppe med Skinke

A recipe for a warming, filling soup found on oxo.co.ukSplit Pea & Ham Soup / Gul Ertesuppe med SkinkeSplit Pea & Ham Soup / Gul Ertesuppe med Skinke

This recipe is English, but it might just as well have been Norwegian. I’ve eaten many a bowl of soup like this in my childhood and I stil make it ever so often. You might safely say it is one of my favourite soups – Ted

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Gulyás-Soup / Gulyás-Suppe

A classic Hungarian soup recipe found in “Berømte Retter”
(Famoud Dishes) published by Ernst G Mortensens Forlag in 1970
Gulyás-Soup / Gulyás-Suppe

Goulash (Hungarian: gulyás [ˈɡujaːʃ]) is a soup or stew of meat and vegetables, seasoned with paprika and other spices. Originating from the medieval Kingdom of Hungary, goulash is also a popular meal in Central Europe, Eastern Europe, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Scandinavia and Southern Europe.

Its origin traces back to the 9th century to stews eaten by Hungarian shepherds. Back then, the cooked and flavored meat was dried with the help of the sun and packed into bags produced from sheep’s stomachs, needing only water to make it into a meal. It is one of the national dishes of Hungary and a symbol of the country.

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Boiled Beef with Dill Sauce / Kokt Oksekjøtt med Dillsaus

A dinner recipe with herbs found in “Alt om Urter” (All About Hebs) published by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1982
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Dill sauces both cold and hot ones are very popular in Scandinavia, particularly in Sweden and can be used with most sorts of meat. Hot it is particularly delicious with lamb and cold yoghurt or sour cream based ones with any sort of shellfish.

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Meat Soup with Oatmeal / Kjøttsuppe med Havregryn

A delicious hearty meat soup recipe found on matprat.no
the soup councilMeat Soup with Oatmeal / Kjøttsuppe med Havregryn

A delicious, hearty soup with game meat or beef for cold autumn and winter evenings. The soup can advantageously be made a day in advance so the flavors can develop.

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Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

A classic salad recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980

Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

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Lucien OlivierThe original version of the salad was invented in the 1860s by a cook of Belgian origin, Lucien Olivier, the chef of the Hermitage, one of Moscow’s most celebrated restaurants. Olivier’s salad quickly became immensely popular with Hermitage regulars, and became the restaurant’s signature dish.

The HermitageThe exact recipe — particularly that of the dressing — was a jealously guarded secret, but it is known that the salad contained grouse, veal tongue, caviar, lettuce, crayfish tails, capers, and smoked duck, although it is possible that the recipe was varied seasonally. The original Olivier dressing was a type of mayonnaise, made with French wine vinegar, mustard, and Provençal olive oil; its exact recipe, however, remains unknown.

At the turn of the 20th century, one of Olivier’s sous-chefs, Ivan Ivanov, attempted to steal the recipe. While preparing the dressing one evening in solitude, as was his custom, Olivier was suddenly called away on some emergency. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Ivanov sneaked into Olivier’s private kitchen and observed his mise en place, which allowed him to make reasonable assumptions about the recipe of Olivier’s famed dressing.

Ivanov then left Olivier’s employ and went to work as a chef for Moskva, a somewhat inferior restaurant, where he began to serve a suspiciously similar salad under the name “capital salad” (Russian: столичный, tr. stolichny). It was reported by the gourmands of the time, however, that the dressing on the stolichny salad was of a lower quality than Olivier’s, meaning that it was “missing something.”

Later, Ivanov sold the recipe for the salad to various publishing houses, which further contributed to its popularization. Due to the closure of the Hermitage restaurant in 1905, and the Olivier family’s subsequent departure from Russia, the salad could now be referred to as “Olivier.”

One of the first printed recipes for Olivier salad, by Aleksandrova, appearing in 1894, called for half a hazel grouse, two potatoes, one small cucumber (or a large cornichon), 3-4 lettuce leaves, 3 large crayfish tails, 1/4 cup cubed aspic, 1 teaspoon of capers, 3–5 olives, and 1 12 tablespoon Provençal dressing (mayonnaise).

As often happens with gourmet recipes which become popular, the ingredients that were rare, expensive, seasonal, or difficult to prepare were gradually replaced with cheaper and more readily available foods.

Frikassé On Smoked Pork Knuckle / Frikassé På Røkt Svineknoke

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
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This traditional Norwegian dish is incredibly delicious winter food! Pork knuckle is very easy to prepare and if you cook the knuckle the night before you’ll use max 20 minutes to cook this delicious dinner.

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Crab and Prawn Pasty / Britisk Pasty Med Krabbe Og Reker

A traditional pasty recipe with a modern twist
found on
about.com/food/
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A traditional pasty recipe will invariably contain meat but a delicious alternative is a Crab and Prawn Pasty. This pasty recipe is light yet very nutritious with such a lovely filling. Buy fresh crab meat when possible, if not, tinned white crab meat is also excellent.

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Fried Trout With Cucumber Salad And Crème Fraîche Sauce / Stekt Fjellørret Med Agurksalat Og Crème Fraîchesaus

A great dish full of sweet memories found on alleoppskrifter.no
Fried Trout With Cucumber Salad And Crème Fraîche Sauce / Stekt Fjellørret Med Agurksalat Og Crème Fraîchesaus

I grew up on this dish, with sour cream sauce, not crème fraîche sauce though. No one knew what crème fraîche was round this neck of the woods back in the fifties and early sixties.

Both my mom and dad was eager anglers, so they headed for the montains every autumn and retured with trout enough to last us till well into the early summer. My granny, one of the bats ;-), came to take care of my sister and me while they were away – Ted

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Baker’s Chicken / Bakerens Kylling

A recipe found in “Fjørfe på Menyen” (Poultry on thr Menu)
published by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1984
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Chicken is great and this recipe seems both simple and delicious. The bakers obviously handle poultry with the same panache as they do bread – Ted 😉

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Lamb Casserole with Root Vegetables / Lammegryte med Røtter

A autumn dinner recipe found in “Cappelens Kokebok”
(Cappelen’s Cook Book) published in 1991
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This is a traditional Norwegian autumn dish. Together with “Mutton in Cabbage” it was served after the lambs were slaughtered in the autumn.

Around this time of the year the grocers here in Norway fill up with lambs meat particularly suite for these two dishes so, yes, the tradition is fortunately still alive – Ted

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1940s – Beef Bourguignon / Beuf Bourguignon

A classic mid-century recipe found at goodhousekeeping.com
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Portrait - Elizabeth DavidAfter the war, celebrated cookery writer Elizabeth David heralded a new, imported cooking culture, popularising French classics such as this beef bourguignon. The dish became popular in Britain in the 1940s. This version is bulked up with vegetables, much as stews would have been at the time due to the rationing.

I can clearly see when studying my collection of old cook books that Scandinavia followed suit about five years later. A remarked interest in Continental cooking, particular French began around 1950 – Ted

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Lightly Salted Cod with Bacon / Lettsaltet Torsk med Bacon

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found on matprat.nolettsaltet torsk med bacon_post

Salted cod reawakens fond childhood memories for many Norwegians, me as well. Along with homemade mashed potatoes, fried bacon and carrots, this is traditional Norwegian food at its best – Ted

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New England Boiled Dinner / Kokt Salt Kjøtt fra New England

A classic recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen Cook Book” published by Marshall Cavendish Ltd in 1980
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traditional badge americanThis easy-to-prepare, one-pot meal is based on freshly-cooked, home-made salt beef and cabbage plus all the root vegetables you have at hand. Serve it with freshly-cooked beetroots, sliced and sprinkled with vinegar.

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Fish Balls with Shrimp Sauce / Fiskeboller med Rekesaus

A recipe from “God Mat fra Sjøen – Gyldendals Store Fiskekokebok” (Great Food from the Sea – Gyldendal’s
Big Seafood Cook Book) published in 1984

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000_fiskeboller_crThis dish was staple on the dinner table when I was a kid and I loved it. Now  a days you never hear anyone mentioning it. I walk by tins of the classic ‘Vesterålen Fiskeboller’ almost everyday at my local grocers, but I never buy one, so I guess I’m like the rest of us Norwegians. Fish balls are not fancy enough any more.

And that’s a pity, because the dish I post recipes for here is actually stil a very tasty dish. But it is for homemade fish balls and homemade always taste better than stuff picked out of a tin of course –Ted 😉

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Cabbage Roulettes with White Sauce / Kålruletter med Hvit Saus

A traditional dinner recipe from “Gode, Gamle Oppskrifter” (Good, Old Recipes) by Ingrid Espelid Hovig published by Gyldendal in 1991
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This is tasty food for young and old. Cabbage roulettes are at their best made with summer cabbage or freshly harvested winter cabbage. Cabbage stored throughout the winter often gets a bit chewy. Leaf of Chinese cabbage can also be used. As filling for cabbage rolls you can use the same farce as for meatball, but make the farce a little looser. Shop bought meat farce has a nice consistency and is easy to use.

Cabbage roulettes has a long tradition as Sunday dinner here in Norway.

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