Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

A no-bake chocolate cake recipe found in “The Chocolate Book”
by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

Sometimes it’s nice to make a cake that needs no baking, just an overnight stay in the refrigerator. This is such a chocolate cake, full of crunchy and sweet goodies.

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4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

4 cake recipes found in “Moderne Baking” (Modern Baking)
published by Freia as in 1938 to promote their baking powder

4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

Baking is strange, our breakfast, lunch and dinner habits and menus change a lot from decade to decade, but our favourite cakes recipes hardly ever change. “Moderne Baking” was published 80 years ago and still you could find these four recipes in one version or other in just about any contemporary baking cook book.

Its nice to know there are still some constants in our lives in these times of rapid changes – Ted

Winking smile

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Sunshine Cake / Solskinnskake

A quick and easy cake recipe found in “Kaker til Kaffekosen” (Coffee Time Cakes) published by Gyldendal in 1991
Sunshine Cake / Silskinnskake

Notice the word “kaffekosen” (kaffe + kos) in the title of the book in Norwegian The word “kos” is closely connected to the Norwegian word “hygge” that was adopted by the English language last year.

Both “hygge” and “kos” are a little hard to explain in English because both words are so tightly connected to the Norwegian mentality. Both words are nouns, but can also be used as verbs “hygge seg” and “kose seg” and it is the verbs that are most often used here in Norway.

Rather loosely both can be translated into ‘having a good time’ or ‘having a nice time’. Several large international surveys have shown that Norwegians are among the happiest people in the world, usually just beaten by the Danish. Our quest for having a nice time should explain a lot of that result.

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Earl Grey Chocolates / Earl Grey Sjokolader

A delicious chocolate recipe found on epicurus.comEarl Grey Chocolates_post

Tasty, sultry and sinfully good, Earl Grey Chocolates provide a delicious snack – a morsel of love. The tea ganache is smooth
and luscious.

This one is for you Ingrid ❤

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Chocolate Frosted Devil’s Cake / Sjokoladekake Med Sjokoladeglasur

A chocolate cake recipe from a Baker’s Chocolate ad
published in 1933
1933_baker's chocolate_post

“It looks delicious, doesen’t it” asks the Baker Chocolate Girl “… This beautiful Devil’s Food? And it is, I promise you! … with it’s soft, generous topping of  cremy-smooth Chocolate Frosting.”Of course it is chocolate … Real, genuine Baker’s Chocolate … that gives the marvelous, rich flavour you want … a truly satisfying flavour that you simply cannot get in any other way.”

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Kist and Chocolate Soldier

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday

The Citrus Products Company was founded in 1919 in Chicago, Illinois. Two of their products, Kist and Chocolate Soldier* are familiar brands of The Citrus Company.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday

Soda & Soft Drink SaturdayLike most soft drink companies, they experimented with different flavors to try and find their niche in the market. Kist was bottled in a wide range of flavors like orange, ginger ale, lemon and grape, and became very popular. They also offered a complete range of bottle sizes including seven ounce, ten ounce and twelve ounce, and also two family sizes.

*Chocolate Soldier

By 1958 Kist was being bottled by franchised bottlers in every state.  In addition to Kist, Citrus Products constantly pushed another product to franchised bottlers that was called Chocolate Soldier. Chocolate Soldier,  a chocolate milk type beverage, grew steadily in sales volume, with the help of the parent company, by providing bottlers with sales and advertising materials. Probably the only thing that stands out in the advertising of Chocolate Soldier is some signs which show a soldier standing at attention

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday

*There was once an unfathomable array of chocolate drinks and chocolate sodas. What happened? Today Yoo-hoo remains, but its competition has fallen on the beverage battlefield. Take Chocolate Soldier, for example, which could not win the soft drink wars despite its nifty name and cute packaging.

 In Context 1:

The Chocolate Soldier (German title: Der tapfere Soldat or Der Praliné-Soldat) is an operetta composed in 1908 by Oscar Straus (1870–1954) based on George Bernard Shaw’s 1894 play, Arms and the Man. The German language libretto is by Rudolf Bernauer and Leopold Jacobson. It premiered on 14 November 1908 at the Theater an der Wien.

Chocolate Soldier

English versions were successful on Broadway and in London, beginning in 1909. The first film adaptation was in 1915. The 1941 film of the same name enlists much of Straus’s music but is otherwise unrelated, using a plot based on Ferenc Molnár’s play Testőr.

In Context 2:

Chocolate Soldier is an expression referring to a good-looking but useless warrior. The term originates as a derogatory label for a soldier who would not fight but would look good in a uniform, shortened from ‘Chocolate Cream Soldier’. It appears in that form in the 1897 book Soldier of Fortune by Richard Harding Davis.

Chocolate Orange Pots / Sjokolade og Appelsinformer

A dessert recipe found in “The Chocolate Book”
by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Chocolate Orange Pots / Sjokolade og Appelsinformer

Chocolate and orange is a delicious combination. The orange adds a bit of freshness to a chocolate dessert that otherwise might seem a little too heavy.

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Chocolate Pots de Creme / Sjokolade Pots de Creme

A classic French dessert recipe found on epicurus.com
Chocolate Pots de Creme_post

Simply extraordinary, Chocolate Pots de Crême may be served in a variety of containers. As individual portions, they’re perfect for entertaining and easy for family sweets. These go perfectly with a nice after dinner liqueur.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 28

The Christmas Recipes – Part 28

Danish Cream Truffles / Flødetrøfler

Danish Cream Truffles / Flødetrøfler

Norwegian Silver Cake / Sølvkake

Norwegian Silver Cake / Sølvkake

The Christmas Recipes – Part 27

The Christmas Recipes – Part 27

Candied Clementine Slices / Kandiserte Klementinskiver

Candied Clementine Slices / Kandiserte Klementinskiver

Oat Macaroons / Havremakroner

Oat Macaroons / Havremakroner

The Christmas Recipes – Part 24

The Christmas Recipes – Part 24

Delfia Cake / Delfiakake

Delfia Cake / Delfiakake

Enchanted Pebbles / Forheksede Småstein

Enchanted Pebbles / Forheksede Småstein

Easy Martha Washington Chocolate Candy / Enkle Martha Washington Sjokolade kuler

A historic candy recipe found at recipelion.com
Easy Martha Washington Chocolate Candy_post

A holiday tradition for many families, Martha Washington’s candy is a treat that’s easy to make and even more delicious to eat. This particular recipe for No-Bake Martha Washington Candy features just a few choice ingredients, making it even simpler to prepare.

Martha WashingtonMartha Washington (née Dandridge; June 13 [O.S. June 2] 1731– May 22, 1802) was the wife of George Washington, the first president of the United States. Although the title was not coined until after her death, Martha Washington is considered to be the first First Lady of the United States. During her lifetime she was often referred to as “Lady Washington”

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 20

The Christmas Recipes – Part 20

Chocolate Truffles On 3 Ingredients / Sjokoladetrøfler På 3 Ingredienser

Chocolate Truffles On 3 Ingredients / Sjokoladetrøfler På 3 Ingredienser

Orange Soup With Pannacotta / Appelsinsuppe Med Pannacotta

Orange Soup With Pannacotta /
Appelsinsuppe Med Pannacotta

Almond and Cherry Chocolate Creams / Mandel og Kirsebær Sjokolade Konfekt

A candy recipe found in “Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes” published by Baker’s Chocolate in 1909
Almond and Cherry Chocolate Creams / Mandel og Kirsebær Sjokolade Konfekt

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The History of KitKat

kitKat_08Use of the name Kit Kat or Kit Cat for a type of food goes back to the 18th century, when mutton pies known as a Kit-Kat were served at meetings of the political Kit-Cat Club in London.

The origins of what is now known as the Kit Kat brand go back to 1911, when Rowntree’s, a confectionery company based in York in the United Kingdom, trademarked the terms Kit Cat and Kit Kat. Although the terms were not immediately used, the first conception of the Kit Kat appeared in the 1920s, when Rowntree launched a brand of boxed chocolates entitled Kit Cat. This continued into the 1930s, when Rowntree’s shifted focus and production onto its Black Magic and Dairy Box brands. With the promotion of alternative kitKat_02products the Kit Cat brand decreased and was eventually discontinued. The original four-finger bar was developed after a worker at Rowntree’s York Factory put a suggestion in a recommendation box for a snack that “a man could take to work in his pack”. The bar launched on 29 August 1935, under the title of Rowntree’s Chocolate Crisp (priced at 2d), and was sold in London and throughout Southern England.

kitKat_05The product’s official title of Rowntree’s Chocolate Crisp was renamed Kit Kat Chocolate Crisp in 1937, the same year that Kit Kat began to incorporate “Break” into its recognisable advertising strategy. The colour scheme and first flavour variation to the brand came in 1942, owing to World War II, when food shortages prompted an alteration in the recipe. The flavour of Kit Kat was changed to dark chocolate; the packaging abandoned its Chocolate Crisp title, and was adorned in blue.[5] After the war the title was altered to Kit Kat and resumed its original milk recipe and red packaging.

kitKat_03Following on from its success in the United Kingdom, in the 1940s Kit Kat was exported to Canada, South Africa, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand. In 1958, Donald Gilles, the executive at JWT Orland, created the iconic advertising line “Have a Break, Have a Kit Kat”. The brand further expanded in the 1970s when Rowntree created a new distribution factory in Germany to meet European demand, and established agreements to distribute the brand in the USA and Japan through the Hershey and Fujiya companies, respectively. In June 1988 Nestlé acquired Kit Kat through the purchase of Rowntree’s. This gave Nestlé global control over the brand, except in the US, and production and distribution increased with new facilities in Japan and additional manufacturing operations set up in Malaysia, India and China.[2]

The Hershey Company has a licence to produce Kit Kat bars in the United States which dates from 1970, when Hershey executed a licensing agreement with Rowntree. Nestlé, which has a substantial kitKat_04presence in the US, had to honour the licensing agreement when it bought Rowntree in 1988 which allowed Hershey to retain the Kit Kat licence so long as Hershey was not sold. As Kit Kat is one of Hershey’s top five brands in the US market, the Kit Kat licence was a key factor in Hershey’s failed attempt to attract a serious buyer in 2002.

Variants in the traditional chocolate bar first appeared in 1996 when Kit Kat Orange, the first flavour variant, was introduced in the United Kingdom. Its success was followed by several varieties including mint and caramel, and in 1999 Kit Kat Chunky was launched and received favourably by international consumers. Variations on the traditional Kit Kat have continued to develop throughout the 2000s. In 2000, Nestlé acquired Fujiya’s share of the brand in Japan, and also expanded its marketplace in Japan, Russia, Turkey, and Venezuela, in addition to kitKat_01markets in Eastern and Central Europe. Throughout the decade Kit Kat has introduced dozens of flavours and line extensions within specific consumer markets, and celebrated its 75th anniversary on 10 October 2009.

The traditional bar has four fingers which each measure approximately 1 centimetre (0.4 in) by 9 centimetres (3.5 in). A two-finger bar was launched in the 1930s, and has remained the company’s best-selling biscuit brand ever since. The 1999 Kit Kat Chunky (known as Big Kat and Kit Kat Extra Crispy in the US) has one large finger approximately 2.5 centimetres (1 in) wide. Kit Kat bars contain varying numbers of fingers depending on the market, ranging from the half-finger sized Kit Kat Petit in Japan, to the three-fingered variants in Arabia, to the twelve-finger family-size bars in Australia and France. Kit Kat bars are sold individually and in bags, boxes and multi-packs. In Ireland, France, the UK and America Nestlé also produces a Kit Kat ice cream, and in Australia and Malaysia, Kit Kat Drumsticks.

In 2010, a new £5 million manufacturing line was opened by Nestlé in York. This will produce more than a billion Kit Kat bars each year.

kitKat_06

Text from Wikipedia