Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

An ice cream recipe found in “Condenced Milk and its use
in Good Cookery” published by  Borden’s Condenced Milk
Company in 1927

Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

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Chocolate Blanc Mange / Sjokolade Blanc Mange

A recipe with a long history found on “One Hundred Tested
Recipe”  published by Carnation in 1921
Chocolate Blanc Mange / Sjokolade Blanc Mange

Blanc mange (/bləˈmɒnʒ/ or /bləˈmɑːndʒ/, from French blanc-manger French pronunciation: ​[blɑ̃mɑ̃ʒe]) is a sweet dessert commonly made with milk or cream and sugar thickened with gelatin, cornstarch or Irish moss (a source of carrageenan), and often flavoured with almonds.

It is usually set in a mould and served cold. Although traditionally white, blancmanges are frequently given alternative colours. Some similar desserts are Bavarian cream, panna cotta, annin tofu, the Turkish muhallebi, and haupia.

The historical blancmange originated some time in the Middle Ages and usually consisted of capon or chicken, milk or almond milk, rice and sugar and was considered to be an ideal food for the sick. Tavuk göğsü is a sweet contemporary Turkish pudding made with shredded chicken, similar to the medieval European dish.

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Dark-Chocolate Cherry Truffles / Mørk Sjokolade- og Kirsebærtrøfler

Yet another grown-up sweets recipe found on chatelaine.com
Dark-Chocolate Cherry Truffles / Mørk Sjokolade- og Kirsebærtrøfler

These tempting truffles add an eye-catching flourish to the dessert table, and with their sweet cherry centre, they’ll disappear in no time.

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Chocolate Plunge / Sjokolade Dip

A hot chocolate dip recipe found on an ad for
Karo and Baker’s published in 1987

Chocolate Plunge / Sjokolade Dip

Indulge in a little hot chocolate, syrup and cream dip during Easter and rescue your conscience by dipping nothing but fresh fruit

Ted
Winking smile

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Tourtière de Crème Grand Mernier

A grand cake recipe found in “The Grand Grand Marnier Cookbook” by James Beard published in 1970
Tourtière de Crème Grand Mernier

“I’m sure that most of us have enjoyed Grand Marnier after many a fine meal. But it’s a shame that we don’t enjoy it so often in our meals. I find Grand Mamier excellent for adding a little extra ‘grandeur’. I hope that you will enjoy my Grand Recipes as much as I enjoyed creating them” – James Beard

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All-Chocolate Boston Cream Pie & Chocolate Pots de Creme / Boston Sjokoladekrempai & Sjokolade Pot de Creme

Chocolate cake and dessert recipes found in “Hershey’s Make it Chocolate!” published by Hershey in 1987
All-Chocolate Boston Cream Pie & Chocolate Pots de Creme / Boston Sjokoladekrempai & Sjokolade Pot de Creme

A real chocolate orgy for you here dear visitor.Chocolate pie with chocolate fill and chocolate glaze and a classic french chocolate dessert to top it all – Ted

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Chocolate Layer Cake / Lagkake med Sjokoladeglasur

En kakeoppskrift funnet i “Igleheart’s Cake Secrets” publisert
av Igleheart Flour in 1928

Chocolate Layer Cake / Lagkake med Sjokoladeglasur

Dette er andre gang jeg poster fra denne gamle Igleheart kokeboka og igjen blir jeg slått av hvor lite baking og baketradisjoner har endret seg over årene sammenlignet med annen mat. Vi synes å ville ha kaker slik de alltid har vært. Kanskje fordi kaker bringe så gode minner fra barndommen vår – Ted

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Butterscotch Cream Dessert Cake / Dessertkake med Karamellkrem

A delicious cake recipe found in “Baker’s Favorite
Chocolate Recipes” published in 1943
Butterscotch Cream Dessert Cake / Dessertkake med Karamellkrem

This book has a lot of great illustration in down toned colours that really caught my attention. I have not tried to brighten up the colours, just given them a little more depth as they probably would have lost some over the last close to 75 years – Ted

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Spiced Hot Chocolate / Krydret Varm Sjokolade

A hot beverage recipe from the 17th century found on historyextra.comSpiced Hot Chocolate / Krydret Varm Sjokolade

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates spiced hot chocolate – a chocolate treat enjoyed by kings and queens.

Sam writes: Hot chocolate has always been one of my favourite drinks but I have often wondered when the drink was first consumed in Britain.

I was surprised to find out that chocolate itself arrived in England in the 1600s, with evidence of it being drunk at the court of Charles I – before it was deemed a sinful pleasure by Oliver Cromwell, and banned.

This recipe is based on the drink served at the English court during the 17th and 18th centuries and the spices make it smell – and taste – wonderful. It’s also very simple to make. The drink is very rich – you won’t need a big portion – but since chocolate was believed to have medicinal properties well into the mid-18th century, you can see it as a relatively guilt-free treat!

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Chocolate Sponge anno 1927 / Sjokoladepudding anno 1927

A classic chocolate dessert found in “Knox Gelatine – Dainty Desserts  – Candies – Salads” published in 1927
Chocolate Sponge_post

I mentioned in the previous post that I loved thin pancakes, but to be honest, I’m sort of a all round dessert kind of guy. So you might already have guessed, I love chocolate desserts too

Ted
Winking smile

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A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

An article by Mary Miley Theobald at history.orgA Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

Some historians think that chocolate drinking spread from England to its North American colonies, but it seems more likely that it came directly in ships that plied the trade routes from the West Indies to the major colonial ports of Boston, Philadelphia, New York, and Newport, Rhode Island. Whatever the route, chocolate arrived in English North America at about the same time it arrived in England. It was available as chocolate nuts, as shells, and in processed “chocolate cakes,” lumps of grated powder and sugar ready to be stirred into boiling water, mixed with whatever ingredients one preferred, and frothed with the little hand mill.

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

Those who bought the cacao seed had to roast and grind the chocolate themselves or, more likely, have their servants or slaves do the tedious job. Those who, like Martha Washington, purchased the cacao shells, steeped them in hot water to make a thin chocolaty drink that was easier on the stomach than oily chocolate.

According to Jim Gay, most chocolate was processed in the northern colonies, in New England, Philadelphia, and New York. It was sold in its various forms in general stores and grocers’ shops. In pre-Revolutionary Williamsburg, unsweetened chocolate went for about two shillings sixpence per pound, slightly more than a free unskilled laborer or sailor earned in a day. Obviously, few of those men drank chocolate. Prices fell, however, and by the nineteenth century, it had become cheap enough to be given to slaves.

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya
Nobilities drinking chocolate in Mrs White’s Chocolate House in London.

Its perceived medicinal value made chocolate a natural product for apothecary shops. It was considered nourishing for the sick as well as an aid to digestion and was believed to promote longevity, help lung ailments, energize the body, cure hangovers, suppress coughs, and, as mentioned, stimulate the libido. For that reason, the Virginia A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails YaAlmanac of 1770 cautioned women against it, warning “the fair sex to be in a particular manner careful how they meddle with romances, chocolate, novels, and the like,” especially in the spring, as those were all “inflamers” and “very dangerous.”

“This was very much ignored,” Jim Gay says. “Women were the main consumers of chocolate. Children were denied chocolate because it was a stimulant.” But it was this sexy reputation that caused chocolate to become associated with love, Valentine’s Day, sinful pleasures, and decadence.

Ben Franklin recommended chocolate as a cure for smallpox in Poor Richard’s Almanac of 1761; Doctor Benjamin Rush did the same in his A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Yamedical texts. Thomas Jefferson thought chocolate would overtake tea and coffee as the American beverage of choice. In a letter of November 27, 1785, to John Adams he wrote, “The superiority of chocolate, both for health and nourishment, will soon give it the preference over tea and coffee in America which it has in Spain.” In this he was mistaken. Chocolate drinking would soon decline in favor of chocolate eating.

By the late eighteenth century, a very few, very wealthy Americans were eating chocolate as food. Not the creamy sort of milk chocolate candy bars we know today—those would not exist until the nineteenth century—this rather gritty chocolate was shaved and cooked into puddings, pies, and tarts and served as a side dish at dinner. It was also mixed into creams and ice creams and almond-shaped candies and served at the finest tables as part of the dessert course.

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

North America’s first cookbook, printed in 1742 in Williamsburg by William Parks, publisher of the Virginia Gazette, contained but one chocolate recipe: “chocolate almonds.” The list of ingredients included A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Yano almonds; the word merely reflected the shape of the chocolate, which was mixed with sugar, orange flower water, and a binder. Today we might call it a chocolate drop.

Gay’s research turned up other Virginia chocolate recipes in manuscript form, sometimes written by an unknown housewife. One of these mixes sugar, chocolate, and almonds, then directs the cook to use cochineal to color them red, saffron for yellow, “Stone blew” for blue, and “the Juice of Spinage” for green. Gay calls this “the eighteenth-century ancestor of M&Ms.”

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails YaChocolate did not really become a food until the middle of the nineteenth century. The pivotal date was 1828, when a Dutchman, Casparus Van Houten, invented a machine for manufacturing powdered low-fat cocoa. Chocolate beverages became easier and cheaper to make, leading to what some have called the democratization of chocolate.

A Cup of Hot Chocolate, S’Good for What Ails Ya

In 1847, an English chocolate maker that had been in business almost a hundred years, J. S. Fry and Sons, developed the first molded chocolate bar. A Swiss, Henri Nestlé, figured out in 1867 how to make powdered milk by evaporation, and another Swiss, Daniel Peter, came up with the idea of blending Nestlé’s powdered milk with chocolate in 1879. The milk chocolate candy bar was on its way.

Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

A no-bake chocolate cake recipe found in “The Chocolate Book”
by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

Sometimes it’s nice to make a cake that needs no baking, just an overnight stay in the refrigerator. This is such a chocolate cake, full of crunchy and sweet goodies.

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4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

4 cake recipes found in “Moderne Baking” (Modern Baking)
published by Freia as in 1938 to promote their baking powder

4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

Baking is strange, our breakfast, lunch and dinner habits and menus change a lot from decade to decade, but our favourite cakes recipes hardly ever change. “Moderne Baking” was published 80 years ago and still you could find these four recipes in one version or other in just about any contemporary baking cook book.

Its nice to know there are still some constants in our lives in these times of rapid changes – Ted

Winking smile

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Sunshine Cake / Solskinnskake

A quick and easy cake recipe found in “Kaker til Kaffekosen” (Coffee Time Cakes) published by Gyldendal in 1991
Sunshine Cake / Silskinnskake

Notice the word “kaffekosen” (kaffe + kos) in the title of the book in Norwegian The word “kos” is closely connected to the Norwegian word “hygge” that was adopted by the English language last year.

Both “hygge” and “kos” are a little hard to explain in English because both words are so tightly connected to the Norwegian mentality. Both words are nouns, but can also be used as verbs “hygge seg” and “kose seg” and it is the verbs that are most often used here in Norway.

Rather loosely both can be translated into ‘having a good time’ or ‘having a nice time’. Several large international surveys have shown that Norwegians are among the happiest people in the world, usually just beaten by the Danish. Our quest for having a nice time should explain a lot of that result.

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Earl Grey Chocolates / Earl Grey Sjokolader

A delicious chocolate recipe found on epicurus.comEarl Grey Chocolates_post

Tasty, sultry and sinfully good, Earl Grey Chocolates provide a delicious snack – a morsel of love. The tea ganache is smooth
and luscious.

This one is for you Ingrid ❤

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