Pork Chops Provençale / Koteletter Provençale

A French dinner recipe found in “52 Søndagsmiddager” (52 Sunday Dinners) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1983koteletter provencale_post

There is something homely and nice about pork chops. In all the changing food fashions that I’ve seen up through my life pork chops have been just like denims, impossible to kill by the people who like to tell us what we should eat or wear – Ted  😉

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French Veal Chops with Calvados / Fransk Kalvekoteletter med Calvados

A great dinner recipe from “The Best of International Cooking”
published by Hamlyn in 1984

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In context: Apple orchards and brewers are mentioned as far back as the 8th century by Charlemagne. The first known Norman distillation was carried out by “Lord” de Gouberville in 1553, and the guild for cider distillation was created about 50 years later in 1606. In the 17th century, the traditional cider farms expanded, but taxation and prohibition of cider brandies were enforced elsewhere than Brittany, Maine, and Normandy.

calvados posterThe area called “Calvados” was created after the French Revolution, but eau de vie de cidre was already called calvados in common usage. In the 19th century, output increased with industrial distillation and the working class fashion for café-calva. When a phylloxera outbreak in the last quarter of the 19th century devastated the vineyards of France and Europe, calvados experienced a “golden age”.

During World War I, cider brandy was requisitioned for use in armaments due to its alcohol content. The appellation contrôlée regulations officially gave calvados a protected name in 1942.

After the war, many cider houses and distilleries were reconstructed, mainly in the Pays d’Auge. Many of the traditional farmhouse structures were replaced by modern agriculture with high output. The Calvados appellation system was revised in 1984 and 1996. Pommeau got its recognition in 1991; in 1997, an appellation for Domfront with 30% pears was created.

Old-School Pork Chops with Apples and Sage / Gammeldagse Svinekoteletter med Epler og Salvie

A great pork recipe found on jamieoliver.com
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Jamie Oliver’s take on a delicious British classic.

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Pork Chops with Honey and Herbs / Svinekoteletter med Honning og Urter

A dinner recipe found in “Alt Om Urter” (All About Herbs)
published by Ekstrabokklubben in 1985

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Marinated Lamb Chops with Green Butter / Marinerte Lammekoteletter med Grønt Smør

A delicious dinner recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980
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Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

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Berliner Chops / Berliner-Koteletter

A recipe from “Husmorens Store Kokebok”
(The Housewife’s Big Cook Book) published in 1964

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This seems like as nice a recipe one could want even though the one in care of setting the text seems to be a bit confuced about whether the main ingredient is pork chops or simply slices of pork. But as always, I never change the text I scan from my old cook books. I simply scan the text, run the text image through ocr scanning and check it to see if the ocr has misinterpreted some of the letters – Ted

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Autumn Chops / Høstkoteletter

A very nice pork chop recipe found in “Svinekjøtt” (Pork) published by Hjemmets Bokklubb in 1981
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Pork chops is something I don’t think I’ll ever tire of. It was one of my favourites as a kid and I still appreciate a nice pork chop recipe. As I’m also fond of mushrooms of any kind and chanterelles in particular, besides shallots this recipe suits me perfectly – Ted

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