The History of Hot Dogs

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To most of us, hot dogs are intrinsically linked with the USA and baseball, but as with many foods, where they end up being the most popular doesn’t necessarily prove their origins.

What is a Hot Dog?

hotdog_03In most parts of the world, the term “hot dog” refers to a cooked, smoled, or cured sausage served in 0a soft long roll with or without relishes. The type of sausage is of some importance in order to call what you’re eating a  “hot dog”.  They are usually frankfurters, also known as Franks, Wieners, Weenies, Dachshunds, Wiener Würstchen, or Frankfurter Würstel.  Also, the bread in which the frankfurter is sold should be a long roll so that the sausage is (mostly) encased in the bread.

Now, some may disagree with the above definition, preferring to refer to just the sausage as a hot dog, however if that were the case then certainly, they were not invented in the USA .

hotdog_06Although the Frankfurter is thought to get its name from Frankfurt in Germany, there are also claims that the sausage known as a “dachshund” or “little-dog” was created in the late 1600’s by Johann Georghehner in Coburg, Germany. However, Frankfurt defends their claim, so much so that in 1987 its  500th birthday was celebrated in Frankfurt.

To muddy the waters even further, Vienna (Wien) in Austria also lays claim to the invention,  using the term “wiener” to prove Vienna as the birthplace of the sausage.

Who Invented the Hot Dog

hotdog_02Assuming our definition of what a hot dog is is accepted, the term “hot dog” was first coined in 1901 at the New York Polo Grounds. The story goes that on a cold day in April,  a man called Harry Stevens was losing money trying to sell ice cream and ice cold soda so he sent his staff out to buy  all the dachshund sausages they could find, together with an equal number of rolls and began selling them  from hotdog_05portable hot water tanks with the hawkers attracting customers by shouting  “Get your dachshund sausages while they’re red hot!”

A sports cartoonist called Tad Dorgan upon hearing the sellers,  drew a cartoon of dachschund sausages in rolls barking like dogs and as he wasn’t sure of the spelling of “dachshund” he just put in the caption “hot dog!”  The cartoon was a hit and the term “hot dog” was born.

hotdog_07The hot dog in a long bun as it is today,  is attributed to a Bavarian concessionaire, Anton Feuchtwanger who introduced it   in 1904 during the St. Louis “Louisiana Purchase Exposition”.  The story goes that he initially loaned white gloves to his customers to hold his hot sausages however, when most of the gloves weren’t returned,  his brother-in-law who was a baker,  made up long soft rolls to hold the sausages.

So, depending on your definition of what a hot dog is, it’s either definitely American or of indeterminate origin.

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How to Make ‘Sun-Dried’ Tomatoes…in the Oven! / Hvordan Lage ‘Soltørkede’ Tomater… i Ovnen!

A great ’how to’ recipe found on about.com/food/How to Make 'Sun-Dried' Tomatoes...in the Oven!_italianfood.about_post

Drying is a traditional Italian way to preserve an abundance of ripe summer tomatoes so that they can be enjoyed throughout the rest of the year, particularly in the southern Italian regions of Calabria and Puglia.

The store-bought sun-dried tomatoes I had tasted were a bit leathery and tough, with not much flavor. They seemed like a faded, desiccated memory of a tomato, rather than a fragrant, intensified taste of summer days. Homemade sun-dried tomatoes are another thing entirely: fragrant and chewy but not tough, with complex, concentrated tomato flavor and a slight sweetness.

Although it’s not difficult, the trouble with making them at home is that many of us do not have the abundant outdoor space required, or the time, or perhaps we lack consistent, strong sunshine, or live in highly polluted cities or bug-infested areas where perhaps drying food outdoors is not the best idea.

The solution? You can easily dry them in your oven.

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A Short History of Worcestershire Sauce

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Worcestershire sauce has its roots in India, but was actually created by accident in its namesake town of Worcester, England in 1835. As the story goes, Lord Marcus Sandy had returned home to England to retire after successfully governing Bengal, India for many years. He so worcestershire_sauce_03missed his favorite Indian sauce that he commissioned drug store owners John Lea and William Perrins to come up with a reasonable facsimile.

The original intent of the chemists was to keep some of the batch to sell in the store, but the fish and vegetable mixture had such a strong odor that they decided otherwise and stored it in the cellar. It lay forgotten for two years, until it was rediscovered during a clean-up mission. The batch had aged into a wonderfully flavored sauce which was bottled and quickly became a hot item with customers.

worcestershire_sauce_01Lea and Perrins successfully branched out by convincing stewards on British passenger ships to include it on their dining table set-ups.

It soon became a British staple, primarily as a steak sauce, and further emigrated worldwide. The guarded recipe basically remains the same. However, the advertising no longer purports to “make your hair grow beautiful.”

Text from about.com

Austrian Kaiser-Smarrn / Østerrikske Kaiser-Smarrn

A classic dessert recipe found in
“God Mat Fra Hele Verden” (Nice Food From All Over the World)
published  by Schibsted in 1971
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traditional badge dessert_flatSchmarrn, a sort of finer pancakes, is known not only in Austria but also in Southern Germany and Bohemia.The name Kaiser schmarrn would presumably allude that this recipe is extra fine and therefore meriting an extra fine name.

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Ketchup History

Ketchup is America’s favorite condiment, being found in 97 percent of kitchens. Studies show tomato ketchup can also be a powerful tool in the fight against cancer and heart disease. You might be surprised to learn that ketchup is not limited to plain tomato varieties.

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The word ketchup is derived from the Chinese ke-tsiap, a pickled fish sauce. It made its way to Malaysia where it became kechap and ketjap in Indonesia.

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00_ketchup_05Seventeenth century English sailors first discovered the delights of this Chinese condiment and brought it west. Ketchup was first mentioned in print around 1690.

The Chinese version is actually more akin to a soy or Worcestershire sauce. It gradually went through various changes, particularly with the addition of tomatoes in the 1700s.

By the nineteenth century, ketchup was also known as tomato soy.

00_ketchup_06Early tomato versions were much thinner with a consistency more like a soy or Worcestershire sauce.

F. & J. Heinz Company began selling tomato ketchup in 1876. By the end of the nineteenth century, tomato ketchup was the primary type of ketchup in the United States, and, the descriptor of tomato was gradually dropped.

Catsup and catchup are acceptable spellings used interchangably with ketchup, however,ketchup is the way you will find it listed in the majority of cookbooks.

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Text from http://homecooking.about.com/

Frankfurters in Lager with Two Nice Accessories / Pølser i Pilsner med To Gode Tilbehør

A few nice recipes from a folder published by Gilde697_pølser i pilsner med to gode tilbehør_intro

Norwegians eat frankfurteres and weiners like there is no tomorrow. Usually we just slap them in a bun and put some ketchup and mustard on them. Here’s a recipe with a bit more panache – Ted

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