Alliance Jam / Alliansesyltetøy

A fancy jam recipe found on frukt.no
Alliance Jam / Alliansesyltetøy

Making jams from different varieties of berries together is always a success. Try the mix you like the best. In this jam we used red currant, raspberry and black currant.

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History in a Jar -The Story of Pickles

An article by Tori Avey published on The History Kitchen in 2014

tigriscleopatraIt is rumored that they were one of Cleopatra’s prized beauty secrets. They make apperances in the Bible and in Shakespeare’s writing. Pregnant women have been known to crave them along with ice cream. Pickles have been around for thousands of years, dating as far back as 2030 BC when cucumbers from their native India were pickled in the Tigris Valley. The word “pickle” comes from the Dutch pekel or northern German pókel, meaning “salt” or Shakespeare“brine,” two very important components in the pickling process. Throughout history pickling was a necessity, as it was the best way to preserve food for a long period of time. As one of the earliest mobile foods, pickles filled the stomachs of hungry sailors and travelers, while also providing families with a source of food during the cold winter months.

Pickles are created by immersing fresh fruits or vegetables in an acidic liquid or saltwater brine until they are no longer considered raw or vulnerable to spoilage. When we think of pickles, cucumbers commonly come to mind. Pickled cucumbers are often lacto-fermented in saltwater brine. During this process lactic microbial organisms develop, which turn the naturally occurring sugars of foods into lactic acid. In turn, the environment becomes acidic quickly, making it impossible for any spoiling bacteria to multiply. Cucumber pickles can also be made with a salt and vinegar brine, a popular choice for home cooks. The brine, known as “pickle juice,” is sometimes used by athletes to treat dehydration, though it has yet to be proven as a true remedy.

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Kosher dills have a unique history of their own. In The Book of Jewish Food, Claudia Roden explains that pickled vegetables were a dietary staple for Jews living in the Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Russia. The sharp flavor of pickles proved a welcome addition to the bland bread-and-potato diet of these cold weather countries. For several generations, it was an autumn custom for Ashkenazim to fill barrels with cucumbers, beets and shredded cabbage. The mixture was left to ferment in a warm place for several weeks, then relocated to cool, dark cellars. The pickles would last through the long cold winter until spring, when new crops of fresh produce were available.

New York 1900When a heavy influx of eastern European Jews arrived in New York City during the late 1800s and early 1900s, immigrants introduced kosher dill pickles to America. Cucumbers were washed, then piled in large wooden barrels along with dill, garlic, spices, kosher salt and clean water. They were left to ferment for a few weeks to several months; shorter fermenting time produced brighter green “half sours,” while longer fermentation resulted in “full sours.” Pickles were sold on pushcarts in the immigrant tenement district of New York City. Over time, Jewish-owned shops selling pickles straight out of the barrel began appearing in droves. Eventually, pickling became a profitable business within the Jewish community. Today, a plate of pickles is usually served complimentary with a meal at the best Jewish delis.

masonHome pickling was made much easier and more sanitary during the 1850s, when two essential canning tools were invented. First, a Scottish chemist by the name of James Young created paraffin wax, which helped to create a seal for food preserved in jars. A few years later, John Mason developed and patented the first Mason jar. Mason’s jars were made from a heavyweight glass that was able to tolerate the high temperatures used in canning and processing pickles.

Of course, pickles aren’t limited to the dill and cucumber variety. They can be sweet, sour, salty, hot or all of the above. Pickles can be made with cauliflower, radishes, onions, green beans, asparagus and a seemingly endless variety of other vegetables and fruits. When the English arrived in the New World, they brought their method for creating sweet pickles with vinegar, sugar and spiced syrup. Eastern Europeans introduced various forms of lacto-fermented cabbage, known as sauerkraut. The French serve tiny, spiced cornichons with heavy pâtés and pungent cheeses. In the Middle East pickles are served with every meal, from peppers to olives to lemons. Russians pickle tomatoes, among other things. Koreans have their kimchi, the Japanese pickle plums and daikon, and Italians pickle eggplants and peppers. Each area of the world has its own beloved variety of pickle.

Candied Ginger / Kandisert Ingefær

A great sweet recipe found on chatelaine.com
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Sweet snacks with incredible flavour. Everyone will want to dig in when you open up a jar of these homemade treats.

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Jane Austen’s Black Butter Jam / Jane Austens Smørbare Syltetøy

A simple but delicious jam recipe found on Bite From The Past
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The Girl who runs Bite From The Past writes: I have been dying to make this ever since I spotted it in The Jane Austen Cookbook by Maggie Black and Deirdre LeFaye.

This is the easiest jam you’ll ever make in your life-and it makes good use of leftover pieces of fruit. It’s funny to me that the instructions state this is a jam for children-probably because it’s a mixed up combination of fruit. I think it’s a wonderful addition to any biscuit or bread at tea time.

In this batch, I used strawberries, two apples that were starting to shrivel, and a couple of really ripe pears. Peel the skins off the apples and pears. You can also use peaches or plums-just be sure to blanche them first to remove the skin.

I did not can these – although you can to preserve them longer. I merely put mine in canning jars and set them in the very back of my refrigerator, where they lasted for several months!

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Traditional Blackberry Jelly / Tradisjonell Bjørnebærgelé

A traditional jelly recipe found on about.com/food/
Traditional Blackberry Jelly Recipe_britishfood.about_post

There has to be some compensation for the disappearance of summer and the sunshine. The abundance of wonderful autumn fruits, vegetables and berries do a great job. From September onwards it is possible to pick from a an abundance including sloes, bilberries, plums, pumpkins, and  wild mushroooms and fat juicy blackberries.

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Traditional Alaskan Simple Rose Hip Syrup / Tradisjonell Enkel Nypesirup fra Alaska

A traditional recipe for a delicious syrup found on homecooking.about.com 
Traditional Alaskan Rose Hip Simple Syrup_homecooking.about_post

nyperRose hips, also sometimes spelled as one word rosehips, are the golf-ball sized red fruit of a variety of rose bush that is native to Alaska among other places. Rosehips are a part of the same fruit family as apples and impart a warm, floral, and fruity flavor. Rose hip syrup is a particularly versatile way to use rosehips in the kitchen.

The sweet syrup can be used on pancakes, porridge, or oatmeal in place of the traditional maple syrup. The syrup can also be used as a sweet, floral ingredient in mixed cocktails. And, of course, nothing is better than rose hip syrup drizzled on ice cream, bread pudding, or other desserts – even just plain yoghurt!

Here in Scandinavia we also use rose hips to make a dessert soup served hot or cold depending on the season. The soup is usually served with a dollop sweetened wipped cream. Powdered dried rose hips are also infused in hot water and drunk like you would tea around here – Ted

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Queen Jam / Dronningsyltetøy

A classic Norwegian jam recipe found in “Sylting og Dypfrysing”
(Jam Making and Deep-freezing) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981

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Back in the fifties and sixties when I was a kid most families around where we lived headed for the mountains or the woodlands to pick berries as soon as they were ripe. My family picked raspberries, lingonberries,coudberries and blueberries every year and my mom would make jams and jellies. Strawberries and apples were bought around the same time and and they ended up as jams and jellies too.

Anyone who have tasted homemade conserves like these know that they beat the shop bought stuff by a mile – Ted

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No-Cook Strawberry Jam / Jordbærsyltetøy Uten Koking

A nice jam recipe found on bbc.co.uk/food/No-cook strawberry jam_bbcgoodfood_post

This sweet strawberry jam is soft set and incredibly easy to make.

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Galia Melon Jam / Nettmelonsyltetøy

A recipe from “Sylting og Dypfrysing” (Jam Making and Deep freezing) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981melonsyltetøy_post

000_nettmelon_cr_thumb[1]Galia Melon has a distinctive grid pattern on the shell. The shell has a base color that is bright yellow, and the web pattern is gray-white to almost golden brown. Galia Melon is a big and round melon with a yellow and juicy pulp. It is actually somewhat larger than all the other sugar melons and can reach a weight up to 3-4 kg. The taste is aromatic, sweet and delicious.

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