Bishop / Bisp

A traditional Norwegian hot drink found on meny.no
Bishop / Bisp

Bishop is traditional Norwegian hot, alcoholic, spicey drink that reminds of gløgg, just that it also contains orange. This is really something to warm a frozen body on those rainy autumn evenings that’s coming soon. Maybe along with some gingerbread with, for example, blue cheese and figs.

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Elderflower & Cucumber Gin & Tonics / Hylleblomst & Agurk Gin & Tonics

A grownup picnic refershment found on BBC food
Elderflower & Cucumber Gin & Tonics / Hylleblomst & Agurk Gin & Tonics

This delicately coloured, refreshing take on the classic gin and tonic makes a perfect picnic tipple.

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Barley Cordial Soup / Byggryns Saftsuppe

A traitional Norwegian sweet soup recipe found on bygdekvinnelaget.no
Barley Cordial Soup / Byggryns Saftsuppe

A nourishing and hearty soup. Often used both before or after the main course during the week in Norway in the old days.

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Blackcurrent Ham / Solbærskinke

A delicious ham recipe found in “Den Store Mini Kokeboken”
(The Big Mini Cook Book) published about 10 years ago
Blackcurrent Ham / Solbærskinke

The Big Mini Cook Book is a collection of 10 booklets bound as one book published by the Norwegian Meat Information Office. One could pick up these booklets at grocers for free about 10 yeas ago and they became very popular.

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Summer Berry Cordial / Sommerbærsaft

A great recipe for berry cordial found on The English Kitchen
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Marie who runs The English Kitchen writes: Our soft fruit is going great guns in the garden at the moment.   It  all seems to be ripening at once.   We have never gotten so many strawberries as the bumper crop we are enjoying this year!   We  moved them into large pots on the patio, which seems to have agreed with them.  Trust me when I say that  I am not complaining!

With so much coming at once however, it can be somewhat of a challenge to use it.  At present I am drying strawberries, raspberries and black currants in our food dehydrator, and I have frozen bags of  them as well.   This weekend I decided to make a summer fruit cordial with some of them . . . something delicious for us to remember summer with in the colder months ahead.  The nice ones that you can buy in the shops are so very expensive . . . I thought it would be nice to make some of our very own.

A Cordial is a thick syrupy fruit drink, very concentrated.   It can be drunk on it’s own in small quantities, or mixed with sparkling water and poured over ice for a refreshing drink.  You can also make an alcoholic cordial:

If you are familiar with the Anne of Green Gables story, you will remember that on a lovely October day Anne invited her friend Diana over for tea in the afternoon.  Marilla had told her they could have the raspberry cordial that was leftover from the church social. Anne took the wrong bottle and the pair proceeded to get very drunk!

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Cranberry Cordial / Tyttebærsaft

A classic Scandinavian cordial found on tara.no443_tyttebærsaft_post

A delicious cordial that is  loved by both grownups and kids. This cordial is often made for Christmas here and in Scandinavia every IKEA in Scandinavia has their version in their shops the year round.

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Old-Fashioned Rose Cordial / Gammaldags Rosendricka

A nice old fashioned cordial recipe found on recept.nuGammaldags rosendricka_recept_se_post

Rose Cordial is a sweet, delicious, intensely floral drink, perfect for a Sunday picnic or warm, lazy summer evenings. With this traditional Swedish recipe you’ll have the cordial ready in a matter of days.

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Russian Dessert / Russedessert

A traditional Norwegian dessert recipe found in
“Gode Gamle Oppskrifter” (Good Old recipes) by Ingrid Espelid published by Gyldendal in 1991
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traditional badge norwegian_flatThey knew how to make much out of a little in the old days. It only took some cordial, water, a little sugar and semolina to make a large bowl of delicious dessert. Just check it out!

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Home Made Norwegian Cordials

I’ve posted a lot of different porridge recipes on this blog and what we usually drink with these porridge here is a drink made from either shop bought or homemade cordials. Every Norwegian grocer will have a wide range of cordials for sale.

In my childhhod, back in the fifties and sixties this was a usual drink for kids for any kind of meal really, sodas was just for special occations back then and home made cordials was quite common.

saftThese cordials could be made from a lot of different berries or fruits; plums, cherries, rhubarb, black currants, red currants, blueberries, raspberries and strawberries and more seldom cranberries or combinations of several of these. And most homes had a special kind of pan for making cordials, a lot still have and make cordials every autumn.

Both blueberry and black currant cordials served as a hot toddy are still believed to have a healing effect on the common cold. And when I was a kid one could buy hot black currant toddy at any given winter sport arrangement. And in my childhood all boys and girls were well behaved if promised “saft og boller” – cold drinks made with cordials and fresh buns.

Cordials have other uses than drink of course, they are great for making sorbets, dessert sauces, adding taste to home made ice cream and cakes. Besides they make a very good basis for liqueurs if you are short of time.

Cordial Pan

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The cordial pan is stacked like this; (1) at the bottom, (2) on top of that with (3) inside of that and (4) on the top. Steam from water boiling in (1) reaches the berries and fruit through the holes in (3) and raw cordial drips down into (2) and can be poured out via (5) which can be closed and open as needed.

What you get out of the cordial pan is called “råsaft” (raw cordial) and can be frozen for further use. To make real cordial you have to cook the raw cordial with sugar and a little wine acid. Both sugar and wine acid will work as conserving agents and will make the cordial keep for ages.