Easy Pizza Bread / Enkelt Pizzabrød

A baking recipe found in “Crisco’s Good Cooking  Made Easy Cook Book” published by Procter & Gamble co in 1978Easy Pizza Bread / Enkelt Pizzabrød

I love the title of this recipe, “Easy Pizza Bread”. It makes it sound like we’ve baked this kind of bread since times immemorial and here, finally, is a simple and easy to make it. On the other hand I’ve never heard of pizza bread before now

Ted
Winking smile

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge baking_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Virginia Spoon Corn Bread / Maisskjebrød Fra Virginia

A bread recipe found in “War Time Recipes”
published by Proctor & Gamble Co in 1918

Virginia Spoon Corn Bread / Maisskjebrød Fra Virginia

Spoon bread, a classic Southern side dish, is actually more like a pudding than a bread. It’s so soft, it can be served – and eaten – with a spoon.

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_063000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Oven Barbecued Meatballs / Ovnsgrillede Kjøttboller

A dinner recipe found in “Crisco’s Good Cooking Made Easy
Cook Book” published by Procter & Gamble Co in 1978
Oven-Barbecued-Meatballs_thumb2

Crisco is a brand of shortening produced by The J.M. Smucker Company popular in the United States. Introduced in June 1911 by Procter & Gamble, it was the first shortening to be made entirely of vegetable oil. Additional products marketed by Smucker under the Crisco brand include a cooking spray, various olive oils, and other cooking oils, including canola, corn, peanut, olive, sunflower, vegetable and blended oils.

If you’re living outside the US you can get hold of Crisco at My American Market if you want to try it in a typical American recipe Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge american000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Corn Bread / Maisbrød

A WWI baking recpe found in “War Time Recipes” published
by  Proctor & Gamble Co in 1918
Corn Bread / Maisbrød

When the United States entered World War I in 1917 food was desperately needed to supply the European civilian and military allies. Herbert Hoover was appointed as head of the U. S. Food Administration and launched a campaign to conserve food. Americans were urged to voluntarily stretch the food supply by cutting waste, substituting plentiful for scarce ingredients and participating in the food-conservation program popularly known as “Hooverizing,” which included wheatless Mondays and Wednesdays, meatless Tuesdays, and porkless Thursdays and Saturdays.

The Food Administration sponsored a program to educate the people about nutrition and food preservation to help persuade them that eating less would not be harmful. Signs and posters proclaimed, “Food Will Win the War” and pitched what became known as the “Doctrine of the Clean Plate.” The National War Garden Commission encouraged Americans to “put the slacker land to use” by growing war gardens and to preserve by canning and drying all the food they could not use while fresh.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny