Sandwich Copenhagen / Smörgås Köpenhamn

A classic scandinavian sandwich recipe found in “Stora boken om Smörgåsar & Smörgåstortor” (The Big Book about Sanwiches and Sandwich Cakes) utgitt i 1985Sandwich Copenhagen / Smörgås Köpenhamn

This sandwich is typical for the lavish sandwiches one can get
at cafes and restaurants in Copenhagen

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Indian Chicken Crepes / Indisk Kyllingfylte Pannekaker

An Indian recipe found in “Quaker Oats Brand Cookbook”
published by The Quaker Oats Company in 1989Indian Chicken Crepes / Indisk Kyllingfylte Pannekaker


Curry, peanuts and raisins are popular flavors of Indian cooking
and make a sensational filling for these healthful oat bran crepes.

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Gosht Takhari – Indian Beef Curry / Indisk Karrirett med Oksekjøtt

A classic North Indian curry found in “The love of Cooking”
by Sonia Allison published in 1972

Gosht Takhari – Indian Beef Curry / Indisk Karrirett med Oksekjøtt

Chicken karahi, also known as gosht takhahi (when prepared with beef instead of chicken) is a Pakistani and North Indian dish noted for its spicy taste. The Pakistani version does not have capsicum or onions whereas the North Indian version often uses capsicum. The dish is prepared in a karahi (wok). It can take between 30 to 50 minutes to prepare and cook the dish and can be stored for later consumption. It can be served with naan, roti or rice. This dish is one the hallmarks of what Indian or Pakistani cuisine is.

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Sausage with Curried Apples / Pølse med Karriepler

A quick and simple lunch recipe found in “Mini Kokebok – Pølser” (Mini Cook Book – Sausages) a free booklet
published by the Norwegian information Office for Meat

Sausage with Curried Apples / Pølse med Karriepler

This simple dish based on only 5 ingredients; Sausages, cheddar, apples, leeks and curry are made in no time and looks as
delicious as it tastes.

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Victorian Kedgeree / Viktoriansk Kedgeree

A classic Victorian breakfast recipe found on CookIt!
Victorian Kedgeree / Viktoriansk Kedgeree

Kedgeree originated amongst the British colonials in India and was introduced to the UK as a breakfast dish in Victorian times. It is rarely eaten for breakfast these days, but is still very popular for lunch or supper.

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Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

A spicy dinner recipe found in “Healthy Recipes with Dairy Food” a free E-book published by Dairy Australia
Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

Thai cuisine (Thai: อาหารไทย, rtgs: Ahan Thai, pronounced [ʔāː.hǎːn tʰāj]) is the national cuisine of Thailand. Balance, detail, and variety are of paramount significance to Thai chefs.

Thai cooking places emphasis on lightly prepared dishes with strong aromatic components and a spicy edge. It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter, and spicy. Thai chef McDang characterises Thai food as demonstrating “intricacy; attention to detail; texture; color; taste; and the use of ingredients with medicinal benefits, as well as good flavor”, as well as care being given to the food’s appearance, smell and context. Australian chef David Thompson, an expert on Thai food, observes that unlike many other cuisines, Thai cooking rejects simplicity and is about “the juggling of disparate elements to create a harmonious finish”.

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Spicy Beans on Toast / Krydrede Bønner på Toast

A vegetarian lunch / snack recipe found in “Sundt og Godt”
(Healthy and Delicious) published by Det Beste in 1988
Spicy Beans on Toast / Krydrede Bønner på Toast

Mild, mashed beans get a spicy and  hot flavour in this fiber-rich stew, served on toasted white bread with cooling tomato slices.

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Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A dinner recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon”
publisert av Alaska Packers Association in 1900

Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A curry dish with a surprisingly copious use of curry powder the age of the book taken under consideration. In other words, a rather hot curry seen with Western eyes – Ted

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Crab Soup / Krabbesuppe

A luxurious soup recipe found in “Sunt og Godt”
(Healthy and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988
Crab Soup / Krabbesuppe

This luxury soup is made with a minimal of effort and it is a pleasure to serve. The mild crab flavour gets a warmer undertone from the curry and basil. You can use lobster instead of crab if you want an even more exclusive soup.

It may be more exclusive, but it will not be more tasty, as lobster boiled in the traditional manner taste less than crabs
cooked the same way

Ted
Winking smile

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Bombay Turkey / Bombay Kalkun

A dinner recipe found in “Better Homes and Gardens
Recipe Card Library” published in 1978
Bombay Turkey / Bombay Kalkun

Compared to most westernized Indian recipes this dish seems to be rather potent. Usually recipes like this goes for 1 – 2 teaspoons of curry powder, this one goes for 2 – 3 tablespoons.

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Easy Thai Chicken Soup with Coconut Milk / Enkel Thai Kyllingsuppe med Kokosmelk

A spicy Thai soup recipe found on godt.no
Easy Thai Chicken Soup with Coconut Milk / Enkel Thai Kyllingsuppe med Kokosmelk

A lovely warming soup with lots of flavor that will make a family favourite at the first go. Make some extra, freeze it and you have a delicious quick dinner for a buzy day.

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Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

A delicious soup recipe found in “50+ Quick & Easy Recipes”
Published by Gotham Steel

Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

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Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata), sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma, is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has butternut-squash (1)a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin. It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the bottom. When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer. It is a good source of fiber, vitamin C, manganese, magnesium, and potassium; and it is an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin E.

Although technically a fruit, butternut squash is used as a vegetable that can be roasted, sautéed, toasted, puréed for soups, or mashed and used in casseroles, breads, and muffins.

History

The most popular variety, the Waltham Butternut, originated in Waltham, Massachusetts, where it was developed at the Waltham Experiment Station by Robert E. Young. Dorothy Leggett claims that the Waltham Butternut squash was developed during the 1940s by her late husband, Charles Leggett, in Stow, Massachusetts, and then subsequently introduced by him to the researchers at the Waltham Field Station. She also claimed that name came from “smooth as butter, sweet as nut”.

Baronet’s Curry / Baronettens Karri

A spicy curry dish recipe from the Victorian era
found at cookit.e2bn.org
Baronet’s Curry / Baronettens Karri

The first English curry house opened in London as early as in 1811 and towards the beginning of the Victorian era (she was born in 1819) exotic spices were getting more and more available. Cook books which were published by the mid 1800s featured many types of curry recipes, and towards the end of 1870 dry spices become so cheap that even farmers with a limited income could indulge in a curry dish from time to time.

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The Goat Curry in William Thackeray’s “Vanity Fair” / Geitekarrien i William Thackerays “Forfengelighetens Marked”

A hot curry recipe found on theguardian.comThe goat curry in William Thackeray's Vanity Fair_post

“Give Miss Sharp some curry, my dear,” said Mr. Sedley, laughing. Rebecca had never tasted the dish before. “Do you find it as good as everything else from India?” said Mr. Sedley. “Oh, excellent!” said Rebecca, who was suffering tortures with the cayenne pepper. “Try a chili with it, Miss Sharp,” said Joseph, really interested. “A chili,” said Rebecca, gasping. “Oh yes!” She thought a chili was something cool, as its name imported, and was served with some. “How fresh and green they look,” she said, and put one into her mouth. It was hotter than the curry; flesh and blood could bear it no longer. She laid down her fork. “Water, for Heaven’s sake, water!” she cried.

Fra “Vanity Fair” av William Makepeace Thackeray

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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