Easy Thai Chicken Soup with Coconut Milk / Enkel Thai Kyllingsuppe med Kokosmelk

A spicy Thai soup recipe found on godt.no
Easy Thai Chicken Soup with Coconut Milk / Enkel Thai Kyllingsuppe med Kokosmelk

A lovely warming soup with lots of flavor that will make a family favourite at the first go. Make some extra, freeze it and you have a delicious quick dinner for a buzy day.

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Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

A delicious soup recipe found in “50+ Quick & Easy Recipes”
Published by Gotham Steel

Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

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Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata), sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma, is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has butternut-squash (1)a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin. It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the bottom. When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer. It is a good source of fiber, vitamin C, manganese, magnesium, and potassium; and it is an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin E.

Although technically a fruit, butternut squash is used as a vegetable that can be roasted, sautéed, toasted, puréed for soups, or mashed and used in casseroles, breads, and muffins.

History

The most popular variety, the Waltham Butternut, originated in Waltham, Massachusetts, where it was developed at the Waltham Experiment Station by Robert E. Young. Dorothy Leggett claims that the Waltham Butternut squash was developed during the 1940s by her late husband, Charles Leggett, in Stow, Massachusetts, and then subsequently introduced by him to the researchers at the Waltham Field Station. She also claimed that name came from “smooth as butter, sweet as nut”.

Baronet’s Curry / Baronettens Karri

A spicy curry dish recipe from the Victorian era
found at cookit.e2bn.org
Baronet’s Curry / Baronettens Karri

The first English curry house opened in London as early as in 1811 and towards the beginning of the Victorian era (she was born in 1819) exotic spices were getting more and more available. Cook books which were published by the mid 1800s featured many types of curry recipes, and towards the end of 1870 dry spices become so cheap that even farmers with a limited income could indulge in a curry dish from time to time.

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The Goat Curry in William Thackeray’s “Vanity Fair” / Geitekarrien i William Thackerays “Forfengelighetens Marked”

A hot curry recipe found on theguardian.comThe goat curry in William Thackeray's Vanity Fair_post

“Give Miss Sharp some curry, my dear,” said Mr. Sedley, laughing. Rebecca had never tasted the dish before. “Do you find it as good as everything else from India?” said Mr. Sedley. “Oh, excellent!” said Rebecca, who was suffering tortures with the cayenne pepper. “Try a chili with it, Miss Sharp,” said Joseph, really interested. “A chili,” said Rebecca, gasping. “Oh yes!” She thought a chili was something cool, as its name imported, and was served with some. “How fresh and green they look,” she said, and put one into her mouth. It was hotter than the curry; flesh and blood could bear it no longer. She laid down her fork. “Water, for Heaven’s sake, water!” she cried.

Fra “Vanity Fair” av William Makepeace Thackeray

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Fish In Curry Sauce / Fisk i Karrisaus

An easy fish dinner recipe found in “Mat For Alle” (Food For Everyone) published by Tiden Norske Forlag in 1985
Fish In Curry Sauce / Fisk i Karrisaus

This is an easy fish casserole that you can make while the potatoes or rice is cooking. Use fresh fish fillet or half defrosted fish in block.

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Jamaican Chicken and Potato Curry / Jamaicanske Kylling Og Potet Karri

A spicy Jamaican curry recipe found on foodandwine.com
Jamaican Chicken and Potato Curry / Jamaicanske Kylling Og Potet Karri

Jamaican curry powder is typically a blend of turmeric, cumin, coriander, mustard seeds, anise seeds, allspice and fenugreek. This flavorful chicken dish requires little hands-on prep time.

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Rice Ring With Curry Fish / Risrand med Karry-fisk

 A spicy fish dish recipe found in “Ris & Pasta” (Rice & Pasta)
published by Lademann in 1978
Rice Ring With Curry Fish / Risrand med Karry-fisk
It may look Indian, but it is as Danish as a freshly baked pastry  😉

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Kedgeree Fishcakes / Kedgeree Fiskekaker

A spicy dinner recipe found on goodhousekeeping.com
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These lightly curry spiced fish cakes are inspired by a classic Indian breakfast dish and can be made a day you have plenty of time and wait ready in the freezer when time is short and dinner needs to made in a hurry.

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Massaman Curry / Massaman Karri

A classic Thai recipe found on goodtoknow.co.ukMassaman curry_goodtoknow_post

This classic, spicy Thai massaman curry recipe is packed full of delicious flavour. This traditional Thai curry is made with coconut milk, massaman curry paste and tamarind, and has potatoes cooked with the beef to make this a hearty warming supper. Chopped peanuts give a nice crunch too.

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1950s Coronation Chicken / 50talls Kronings Kylling

A great 1950s dinner recipe found on goodhousekeeping.com1950s - Coronation Chicken_post

Created by Rosemary Hume, founder of London’s L’Ecole du Petit Cordon Bleu, this dish was served at the Queen’s Coronation in 1953. The recipe was published ahead of the Coronation so the dish could also be enjoyed at street parties nationwide. Still perfect for a summer party.

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"Hot" Fish Balls / "Hete" Fiskeboller

A recipe from “Godt i microbølgeovn” (Delicious in the Microwave)
in the book series “Ingrids Beste”
published by Gyldendal in 1991
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Ingrid Espelid Hovig was Norway’s TV cook so long that people under fifty hardly remember a time when she was not introducing us all to both new and traditional dishes in her easy and freiendly manner.

The book this recipe is taken from is from a series of books called Ingrids Beste (Ingrid’s Best). This particular book deals with food made in microwaves and was published more than 25 years ago when microwave ovens was seen as the modern housewife’s salvation providing quick and practical cooking.

Our wievs on microwave ovens have change drastically since then, but remember, the recipes in this book can of course be cooked in more traditional manners. And honestly. it might  make them even better – Ted  😉

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Curry Mussels / Blåskjell i Karri

A hot shelfish recipe found in “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance)
published in 1991

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Nordic cookbook history was written in 1974. That year a bunch of foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, Carl Butler’s Cookbook. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of herbal spices and garlic it can be found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and paté on our tables.

For all Scandinavians who like me love this cook book it took 17 years before we could hurry to the book shops to buy the continuance. It was simply called “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance). This recipe is from that book – Ted

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Curry Chops / Karrikoteletter

A classic Scandinavian dinner recipe found on joker.no
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Curry chops is an old Scandinavian classic that deserves to be brought back into our dinner repertoire. Easy and delicious everyday dinner!

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Lamb Curry / Lam i Karri

An Anglo-Indian recipe found in “Berømte Retter” (Famous Dishes) published by Ernst G Mortensens Forlag in 1970 Lamb Curry post_ill

traditional badge ethnic speciality_flatCurry powder consists of a mixture of at least 7-8 different kinds of spices and plants. It originates from India, where housewives still mixes their own curry adapted to their family’s taste. Curry from the Madras area is considered to be much sharper (hotter) in flavor than the one from North India. traditional badge british_flatDuring their Indian colonial times the British learned to appreciate curry, and when the officers and soldiers came back to England, they had developed a taste for these spicy dishes and brought them thus into the English kitchen.

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