Potato Waffles with Smoked Salmon / Kartoffelvafler med Røget Laks

A fun way to serve potatoes found on soendag.dk 
Potato Waffles with Smoked Salmon / Kartoffelvafler med Røget Laks

A fun and delicious way to serve potatoes!

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Chalet Orange Soufflé / Chalet Appelsinsufflé

A recipe from “Famous Florida Chefs’ Favorite Citrus Recipes”
published by Florida Citrus commission in 1970

Chalet Orange Soufflé / Chalet Appelsinsufflé

A soufflé (French: [su.fle]) is a baked egg-based dish which originated in early eighteenth century France. It is made with egg yolks and beaten egg whites combined with various other ingredients and served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to breathe” or “to puff”

The earliest mention of the soufflé is attributed to French master cook Vincent de la Chapelle, circa the early eighteenth century. The development and popularization of the soufflé is usually traced to French chef Marie-Antoine Carême in the early nineteenth century

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Thickened Chicken Soup / Jevnet Hønsesuppe

A quick soup recipe found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for
Busy People) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

Thickened Chicken Soup / Jevnet Hønsesuppe

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Sour Cream Waffles / Rømmevafler

A breakfast recipe found  in “The New Sealtest Book of
Recipes and Menus” published by  Sealtest Inc in 1940Sour Cream Waffles / Rømmevafler

A rather surprising waffle recipe for scandinavians who do not serve waffles for breakfast, but more like we would serve cakes. A waffle recipe without sugar or other sweetening would of course then seem a little strange to us.

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Tudor Vegetable Pie / Grønnsakspai fra Tudortiden

A meatless pie recipe from the Tudor era
found at historyextra.com

 Tudor Vegetable Pie / Grønnsakspai fra Tudortiden

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, a vegetable pie from the Tudor era.

Sam writes: This 1596 recipe for a “pie of bald meats [greens] for fish days” was handy for times such as Lent or Fridays when the church forbade the eating of meat (another similar recipe is called simply Friday Pie). Medieval pastry was a disposable cooking vessel, but in the 1580s there were great advancements in pastry work. Pies became popular, with many pastry types, shapes and patterns filled with everything from lobster to strawberries. This pie’s sweet/savoury combo is typical of Tudor cookery. I enjoyed it, but was glad I’d reduced the sugar content.

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Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

A fish recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon” published by Alaska Packers Association in 1900Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

Chafing-Dish_thumb2A chafing dish (from the French chauffer, “to make warm”) is a kind of portable grate raised on a tripod, originally heated with charcoal in a brazier, and used for foods that require gentle cooking, away from the “fierce” heat of direct flames. The chafing dish could be used at the table or provided with a cover for keeping food warm on a buffet. Double dishes that provide a protective water jacket are known as bains-marie and help keep delicate foods, such as fish, warm while preventing overcooking.

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