Egg and Bacon Muffins / Egg- og Baconmuffins

A fancy breakfast recipe found on gilde.no
Egg and Bacon Muffins / Egg- og Baconmuffins

Bacon and eggs belonging to those delicious weekend breakfasts for many of us. If you want to try a little playful variation, you can prepare them in a muffin mould for an even better presentation on the plate.

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Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

An eighteen centure sickbed recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Modern custard recipes usually call for vanilla, but that wasn’t used in America in colonial times. Thomas Jefferson first brought vanilla beans back from France in the 1890s, and as Richard Sax noted in Classic Home Desserts, vanilla extract wasn’t widely available until the mid-19th century. Eighteenth-century custards were flavored with wine or brandy, tea, or spices. I added nutmeg to Simmons’s recipe since it seemed so bland — but I guess that was sort of the point.

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Norwegian Cod with Egg Sauce / Torsk med Eggesmør

A classic Norwegian recipe found in “The Best of
International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984

Norwegian Cod with Egg Sauce / Torsk med Eggesmør

This is what happens in books like this, the authors like to fiddle with the recipes giving them their personal touch ruining the authenticity. This is a rather well known recipe to Norwegians. The sauce here, which in Norway isn’t even called a sauce, but “Eggesmør” (egg butter) is wrong. I’ve just been checking through several dozens of recipes. Some use just eggs and butter, some cream, eggs and butter. Some chop the eggs finely, some roughly. Some add chives, some parsley or dill. But no one but no one uses broth or tomatoes.

I’m sure people from other countries have found their local recipes have been fiddled with too. But having said as much, you really should try this recipe, it is simply delicious. Just leave out the broth and tomatoes in the sauce/egg butter.

Ted
Winking smile

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Asparagus and Mushroom Omelette / Asparges- og Soppomelett

A vegetable omelette recipe found in “Sundt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Asparagus and Mushroom Omelette / Asparges- og Soppomelett

Omelettes are among the the most versatile dishes there is. You can make one for breakfast, for lunch, as an appetizer, a dessert and even enjoy one as an evening meal. You can fill them with just about anything and use whatever kind of spice or herbs you prefere to suit your taste and eating practices. For instance vegetables and chives like in the one in this post.

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Chocolate Sponge anno 1927 / Sjokoladepudding anno 1927

A classic chocolate dessert found in “Knox Gelatine – Dainty Desserts  – Candies – Salads” published in 1927
Chocolate Sponge_post

I mentioned in the previous post that I loved thin pancakes, but to be honest, I’m sort of a all round dessert kind of guy. So you might already have guessed, I love chocolate desserts too

Ted
Winking smile

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Loudoun’s Apple Pudding / Loudouns Eplepudding

An 18th centure dessert recipe found on evolutionarypie.com
Loudoun’s Apple Pudding / Loudouns Eplepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs https://revolutionarypie.com writes: John Campbell Loudoun’s apple pudding recipe first caught my eye because it was written in verse. A rarity today, rhyming recipes were common in the 19th and early 20th centuries, when they were supposedly used by housewives to help them remember recipes. Loudoun’s poem, attributed to him by Kristie Lynn and Robert Pelton, authors of The Early American Cookbook, is much older, dating back to the 18th century.

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Danish Egg And Bacon Cake / Dansk Egg- og Baconpanne

A breakfast recipe from “The Love Of Cooking” (Kjærligheten Til Matlaging) published published by Ebury Press in 1972
Danish Egg And Bacon Cake / Dansk Egg- og Baconpanne

The Danes take breakfast seriously (as they do all other meals) so a dry slice of bread with a quickly added spread will hardly do after the morning shower in that neck of the woods. This delicious skillet dish should prove my point – Ted

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WWII Homity Pie / WWII Homity Pai

A pie recipe from The Second World War  found on historyextra.com
WWII Homity Pie / WWII Homity Pai

No one knows where the name for Homity Pie originates from but the dish was popular with land girls during the Second World War. As well as unrationed items, the recipe also includes rationed foods like cheese, eggs and butter – the original recipe would have used these frugally. Nowadays we don’t have to be so sparing with the cheese and butter, which only make it even tastier.

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates homity pie – a hearty, vegetarian dish popular during the Second World War.

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In Contex

The Land Girls

The Women’s Land Army (WLA) was a British civilian organisation created during the First and Second World Wars so women could work in agriculture, replacing men called up to the military. Women who worked for the WLA were commonly known as Land Girls. The name Women’s Land Army was also used in the United States for an organisation formally called the Woman’s Land Army of America.

landgirls

In effect the Land Army operated to place women with farms that needed workers, the farmers being their employers.

Second World War

As the prospect of war became increasingly likely, the government wanted to increase the amount of food grown within Britain. In order to grow more food, more help was needed on the farms and so the government started the Women’s Land Army in June 1939.

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The majority of the Land Girls already lived in the countryside but more than a third came from London and the industrial cities of the north of England.

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In the Second World War, though under the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, it was given an honorary head – Lady Gertrude Denman. At first it asked for volunteers. This was supplemented by conscription, so that by 1944 it had over 80,000 members. The WLA lasted until its official disbandment on 21 October 1949.

Land girls were also formed to supply New Zealand’s agriculture during the war. City girls from the age of 17 and up were sent to assist on sheep, cattle, dairy, orchard and poultry properties.

In popular culture

The Women’s Land Army was the subject of:

Medieval Monday – Ember Day Tarts / Emberdags Terter

A meat free fasting day tart recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
headingMedieval Monday - Ember Day Tarts / Emberdags Terter

Four times every year in the Catholic calendar, there were “Ember Days” – consisting of a Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday – when meat was forbidden. Cheese and eggs, however, were allowed. An ‘Ember Day Tart’ therefore was a filling dish served instead of meat on these fasting days. The tarts in the recipe are a little like a sweet quiche.

The recipe uses galingale, it is well worth finding some as its aromatic taste is not easily replaced. You can use ginger as a substitute but this will give heat rather than a more rounded flavour.

The recipe was originally written down as follows:

‘Tart in embre day: take and parboile onynons; presse out the water & hewe hem smale;take brede & bray it in a mortar,and temper it up with ayren; do perto butter, safron, spice and salt and corans & a ltel sugar with powdor douce, and bake it in a trap,& serve it forth.’

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Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

En classic Victorian recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

Salmagundy is essentially the same recipe as the georgian ‘salamongundy’, however as food fashions moved on the dish became a small, delicate individual salad and was served as part of afternoon tea, rather than as a whole dish at a main meal.

The whole dish is made in a tiny tea cup and turned out onto the saucer as a single portion salad. The Victorians and Edwardians made afternoon tea very fashionable. Scones and teabreads, little cakes and cucumber sandwiches all had their place at these elaborate teas.

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Lumbard Mustard / Lumbardisk Sennep

A fourteenth century recipe found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday_headingLumbard Mustard / Lumbardisk Sennep

saaraSaara whe runs Let Hem Boyle writes: I have to say that I love mustard! All different kinds of… it can be strong, mild, vinegary, spiced.. I do like them all. Making mustard for an event has been a plan for long time, but I haven’t done it until Midwinter Feast. This recipe is great! You can make it beforehand and store it in the fridge. It will be good stored in fridge for couple of weeks.

Take mustard seeds and waishe it and drye it in an ovene, grynde it drye. Farse it thurgh a farse. Clarifie hony with wyne and vynegur and stere it wel togedrer and make it thikke ynowz. And whan thou wilt spende thereof make it tnynne with wyne.

Original recipe from Forme of Cury, 1390

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Meatloaf Fifties Style / Femtitalls Kjøttbrød

A typical dinner recipe from “God Og Billig Hverdagsmat”
(Nice And Inexpensive Everyday Food)
published  by N W Damm & Sønn in 1955

Meatloaf Fifties Style / Femtitalls Kjøttbrød

There is a delightful simplicity to the recipes in this book, completely free of all the show off vanity one finds in particularly cook books from the late eithties and early nineties.

This is straightforward everyday food presented simply and honestly, just like the Scandinavian fifites themselves. The recipe is from one of my mother’s cook books, now mine, and I’m very fond of it – Ted

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Medieval Monday – Arbolettys

A medieval spicy egg dish recipefound on
One Year and Thousand Eggs Medieval Monday_headingMedieval Monday – Arbolettys

Saara who runs One Year and Thousand Eggs writes: This egg dish is kind of scrambled eggs with herbs. It is very good with toasted bread.

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Beef à la Rydberg / Biff á la Rydberg

A classic Swedish dish found  in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978

Beef à la Rydberg / Biff á la Rydberg

This classic dish is from old Hotel Rydberg in Stockholm. A nice party dish when one is willing to go for beef fillet, because beef fillet is needed in this case. But one does not have to use the very finest fillets, since the meat should be cut into pieces.

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Chocolate Orange Pots / Sjokolade og Appelsinformer

A dessert recipe found in “The Chocolate Book”
by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Chocolate Orange Pots / Sjokolade og Appelsinformer

Chocolate and orange is a delicious combination. The orange adds a bit of freshness to a chocolate dessert that otherwise might seem a little too heavy.

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