Bindae Duk – Korean Mung Pancakes / Koreanske Mungbønnepannekaker

A Korean pancake recipe found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise”
(A Culinary Voyage) published by Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987

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Small, crispy fried pancakes made of ground mung beans with diced ham and kim chee is a tasty appetizer served with flavorings such as chilisauce and soy sauce. They can be eaten both hot and cold.

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Hot Gipsy Tartlets / Varme Sigøyner-Tarteletter

A traditional gipsy recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Scandinavisk Presse in 1977

Hot Gipsy Tartlets / Varme Sigøyner-Tarteletter

Gypsy cuisine has been called “the little known soul food”. Gypsies have a rich and complicated identity and history, which is reflected in the delicious complexity of the food, and, like most things, it’s a lot better when you understand it. First, the word “Gypsy” is the term that gadjé (Rromanes for non-Romani people) have used to refer to Roma, the ethnic group originating in India around the eleventh century.

Gypsies divide food into two categories: “ordinary” and “auspicious” or “lucky” (baxtalo). Auspicious foods are believed to be particularly healthy for the body and soul, and these beliefs are likely rooted in Ayurveda, the traditional Hindu system of medicine that uses food, herbs, and yogic breathing to balance the body.

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Gáhkko – Sami Bread / Samisk Brød

A traditional Sami bread recipe found on mytaste.no
headingGáhkko – Sami Bread / Samisk Brød

Gáhkko is a traditional Sami flat bread /bread that has a faint taste of anise. Excellent, and delicious as an accessory for stews and soups, and gorgeous with any kind of cheese. There are countless recipes and ways to bake it, but the best way and what gives the bread the best flavour is to fry them in a dry frying pan on the campfire. It works just as fine to bake this bread on a griddle or in an oven as well. Some sami bakers  make them them large, some make them small.

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Jamaican Chicken and Potato Curry / Jamaicanske Kylling Og Potet Karri

A spicy Jamaican curry recipe found on foodandwine.com
Jamaican Chicken and Potato Curry / Jamaicanske Kylling Og Potet Karri

Jamaican curry powder is typically a blend of turmeric, cumin, coriander, mustard seeds, anise seeds, allspice and fenugreek. This flavorful chicken dish requires little hands-on prep time.

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The History Of Tapas

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The Spanish practice of going out for tapas – called el tapeo – had its The history Of Tapas_02humble beginnings long ago and ironically originally involved empty plates. Widely thought to have gotten its start in Seville, bartenders would cover – or tapar – wine glasses with a small plate in order to protect the drink from fruit flies. Soon, they took to placing a simple slice of ham on top of this place, an addition which naturally appealed to bar patrons. Seeing the possibility of attracting more customers, the bar-owners began varying the tapas adorning the little plates that came with each drink, and the widespread national phenomenon known as tapas got its start.

Traditions

The history Of Tapas_03Going out for tapas is one of the few phenomenal gastronomic experiences that doesn’t involve a table cloth and a pricey sit-down meal. The way to enjoy tapas is to stand at the bar with a group of friends, share a few different tapas, and wash them down with wine or beer. Afterwards, pick a new bar, a new spread of tapas, and repeat the process. You can easily see why, when the conversation is lively and the tapas delicious, this advanced art of snacking can certainly substitute a whole meal.

Typical Tapas

The history Of Tapas_05Don’t be shy about asking what order as most bars will suggest that you try their specialties, which usually happen to be the region’s specialties as well. Tapas menus undeniably vary as you move through Spain; the best tapas in central Madrid, for example, are sure to be different from the choice tapas along the northern Galician shores. However, regardless of whether you’re relaxing along the Mediterranean or channelling your inner Don Quijote in La Mancha, you are sure to find some common tapas “classics.”

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As Spain is located on the Iberian peninsula and therefore very nearly surrounded by water, seafood and shellfish naturally play a huge part in Spanish gastronomy. A few delicacies of the sea to try are calamares (fried squid), cod fritters, gambas pil-pil (prawns in hot, garlic oil), and boquerones (anchovies). Moving away from seafood, other typical tapas include chorizo (sausage), paella (rice dish), a variety of casserole stews, callos (tripe with chickpeas), jamón serrano (cured ham), albóndigas (meatballs) and the ever classic tortilla española (Spanish potato omelette).

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Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

A Caucasian chicken  recipe found in “The Best of
International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984

Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

The cuisine of the Caucasus includes the traditional cuisines of Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Dagestan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay–Cherkessia, North Ossetia–Alania, South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Adjaria, and Adygea.

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Felfel Bil Roz – Egyptian Stuffed Peppers / Egyptiske Fylte Paprika

A classic Egyptian recipe from “God Mat Fra Hele Verden” (Delicious Food From All The World) published by Schibsted in 1971
Felfel Bil Roz – Egyptian Stuffed Peppers / Egyptiske Fylte Paprika

Stuffed vegetables are known from throughout the Balkans and most other places in the Middle East. Here’s the Egyptian version.

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Pakoras – Indian Snack With A Great Taste! / Indisk Godbid Med Stor Smag!

A classic indian potato snack recipe found on madogbolig.dk
Pakoras - Indian Snack With A Great Taste! / Indisk Godbid Med Stor Smag!

Everyone who love Indian food loves pakoras, and if you have not yet tasted this exotic potato dish, then you may just as well start now!

If you are tired of boiled or baked potatoes, then it is time to try this Indian potata dish. Pakoras are slices of baking potatoes wrapped in a batter of chickpea flour, coriander, chili and garlic and deep-fried.

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Italian Torrone / Italiensk Torrone

An Italian speciality found in “European Favourites”
by Carol Wright published by Collins in 1973

Italian Torrone / Italiensk Torrone

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Tortillas de Maíz – Corn Tortillas / Maistortillas

A recipe from “Mexican Cooking” by Carolyn Dehnel
from the “Internatioal Gourmet” series
published by Crecent Books in 1986
Tortillas de Maíz – Corn Tortillas / Maistortillas

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Aish Baladi – Egyptian Flatbread / Egyptisk Flatbrød

A North African flatbread recipe found on saveur.com
Aish Baladi – Egyptian Flatbread / Egyptisk Flatbrød

Similar to pita, but made with whole wheat flour, this Egyptian flatbread is traditionally baked in scorching-hot ovens in Cairo’s bustling markets. Home cooks can achieve similar results with a baking stone and an oven cranked to high.

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Japanese Omelette / Japansk Omelett

A lunch recipe found in “Internasjonale Retter med Norsk Fisk” (International dishes with Norwegian Fish) published
by Wennergren – Cappelen in 1987
Japanese Omelette / Japansk Omelett

Chirashi Sushi is a Japanese dish consisting of rice and shellfish, vegetables and spices. It is all put into a thin omelette and served  beautifully on a platter.

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Baath – Goan Coconut Cake / Kokoskake fra Goa

An Indian cake recipe found on saveur.com
Goan Coconut Cake (Baath)_post

A hint of rosewater adds sweet, floral aroma to this moist, dense semolina cake, packed with four types of coconut. Refrigerating overnight gives the semolina time to soak up the sweet coconut liquid, resulting in a softer, more tender crumb.

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Creamy Dreamy Chicken Korma / Kremet Drømmeaktig Kylling Korma

A classic Indian chicken recipe found on TescoRealFood
Creamy Dreamy Chicken Korma / Kremet Drømmeaktig Kylling Korma

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French Veal Chops with Calvados / Fransk Kalvekoteletter med Calvados

A great dinner recipe from “The Best of International Cooking”
published by Hamlyn in 1984

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In context: Apple orchards and brewers are mentioned as far back as the 8th century by Charlemagne. The first known Norman distillation was carried out by “Lord” de Gouberville in 1553, and the guild for cider distillation was created about 50 years later in 1606. In the 17th century, the traditional cider farms expanded, but taxation and prohibition of cider brandies were enforced elsewhere than Brittany, Maine, and Normandy.

calvados posterThe area called “Calvados” was created after the French Revolution, but eau de vie de cidre was already called calvados in common usage. In the 19th century, output increased with industrial distillation and the working class fashion for café-calva. When a phylloxera outbreak in the last quarter of the 19th century devastated the vineyards of France and Europe, calvados experienced a “golden age”.

During World War I, cider brandy was requisitioned for use in armaments due to its alcohol content. The appellation contrôlée regulations officially gave calvados a protected name in 1942.

After the war, many cider houses and distilleries were reconstructed, mainly in the Pays d’Auge. Many of the traditional farmhouse structures were replaced by modern agriculture with high output. The Calvados appellation system was revised in 1984 and 1996. Pommeau got its recognition in 1991; in 1997, an appellation for Domfront with 30% pears was created.