Apple and Sauerkraut Sausage Skillet / Eple, Sauerkraut og Pølse Panne

A guick German type dinner recipe found in
“The Quick & Eary Armour Cookbook” published by
Benjamin Company-Rutledge Books in 1980Apple-n-Sauerkraut-Sausage_thumb2

Bratwürst, sauerkraut and apples. It doesn’t get much
more German than that.

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German PotatoSoup / Tysk Potetsuppe

A traditional German soup recipe found in“Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970
German PotatoSoup / Tysk Potetsuppe

The Germany cuisine has evolved as a national cuisine through centuries of social and political change with variations from region to region. Some regions of Germany, like Bavaria and neighbouring Swabia, share dishes with Austrian and parts of Swiss cuisine.

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Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

A soup recipe found in “Flavours of Hungary Recipes”
a free E-book publiched by the Hungarian
Agricultural Marketing Centre in 2009Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

Proper ingredients are necessary but not sufficient for full success. The Hungarian “art de la table” does not only cover the ingredients but also the method of preparation. The special flavours of the traditional Hungarian cuisine are produced by the combination of tasty ingredients of excellent quality with their specific mode of preparation.

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Austrian Apricot Dumplings / Østerrikske Aprikosdumplings

An Austrian dessert speciality found in “The best of International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984
Austrian Apricot Dumplings / Østerrikske Aprikosdumplings

Dumpling is a broad classification for a dish that consists of small pieces of dough (made from a variety of starch sources), often wrapped around a filling (as in ravioli or wontons). The dough can be based on bread, flour, or potatoes, and may be filled with fish, meat, sweets, or vegetables. They may be cooked by boiling, frying, simmering, or steaming.

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Hungarian Dobos Torte / Ungarsk Dobos Torte

A classic Continental 19th century cake recipe found in
“The Chocolate Book” by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Hungarian Dobos Torte / Ungarsk Dobos Torte

Dobos torte or Dobosh (pronounced [ˈdoboʃ], Hungarian: Dobos torta) is a Hungarian sponge cake layered with chocolate buttercream and topped with caramel. The five-layer pastry is named after its inventor, Hungarian confectioner József C. Dobos, who aimed to create a cake that would last longer than other pastries in an age when cooling techniques were limited. The round sides of the cake are coated with ground hazelnuts, chestnuts, walnuts, or almonds, and the caramel topping helps to prevent drying out.

Dobosh or Dobos torte was first introduced at the National General Exhibition of Budapest in 1885; King Franz Joseph I and Queen Elisabeth were among the first to taste it. The cake soon became popular throughout Europe, both for its durability through shipping and for its unique appearance. With its flat, shiny, caramel top, it was simple but elegant, as opposed to the more intricate cakes of the age.

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