Lightning Quick Cheese Sauce / Lynrask Ostesaus

A recipe from an ad for Carnation Evaporated Milk
published in LIFE magazine in 1952

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Oh, evaporate milk. That housewives’ saving angel from pre-refrigiator times 😉

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Corn-Crisped Chicken /Cornflakessprø Kylling

A recipe from an ad for Kellogg’s Corn Flake Crumbs
published sometimes in the sixties

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How about a chicken-fry without all that bothersome frying? You can do it with Kellogg’s Corn Flake Crumbs. This golden Corn Crisped Chicken is baked. Doesn’t call for shortening. Needs no turning or watching. No pan to wash later, either. And it’s so easy to make that you can relax and be your own guest.

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Festive Fruit Kake / Festklar Fruktkake

A recipe from an ad for Pet Milk published
in LIFE magazine in 1956
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A fruit cake rich in candied fruit, crunchy nuts, with both dark and golden seedless raisins.

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In context:
Evaporated milk was a popular product before refrigerators were common in homes, but is now a niche product mainly used in baking and other recipes.

Pet, Inc., was an American company that was the first to commercially produce evaporated milk as a shelf-stable consumer product and later became a multi-brand food products conglomerate. Its signature product, PET Evaporated Milk, is now a product of The J.M. Smucker Company.

PET Dairy is a regional brand of fresh and processed dairy products in the Southeastern United States made by the Land-O-Sundivision of Dean Foods. Many of the remaining brands once owned by Pet, Inc. are currently part of General Mills.

Text from Wikipedia

Orange Pie / Appelsinpai

A pie recipe from an ad for Carnation published in
Life magazine in 1955

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It isn’t every pie that gets baked in the oven, this one is done in the fridge 😉

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A Look at Evaporated Milk

Evaporated milk, known in some countries as unsweetened condensed milk, is a shelf-stable canned milk product with about 60% of the water removed from fresh milk. It differs from sweetened condensed milk, which contains added sugar. Sweetened condensed milk requires less processing since the added sugar inhibits bacterial growth.

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Colwell & Brothers cast iron vacuum pan, for evaporating milk, 1860s

The product takes up half the space of its nutritional equivalent in fresh milk. When the liquid product is mixed with a proportionate amount of water, evaporated milk becomes the rough equivalent of fresh milk. This makes evaporated milk attractive for shipping purposes as it can have a shelf life of months or even years, depending upon the fat andcarnation sugar content. This made evaporated milk very popular before refrigeration as a safe and reliable substitute for perishable fresh milk, which could be shipped easily to locations lacking the means of safe milk production or storage.

The process involves the evaporation of 60% of the water from the milk, followed by homogenization, canning, and heat-sterilization.

Definition

Evaporated milk is fresh, homogenized milk from which 60 percent of the water has been removed. After the water has been removed, the product is chilled, stabilized, packaged and sterilized. It is commercially sterilized at 240-245 °F (115-118 °C) for 15 minutes. A slightly caramelized flavor results from the high heat process, and it is slightly darker in color than fresh milk. The evaporation process concentrates the nutrients and the food energy (kcal); unreconstituted evaporated milk contains more nutrients and calories than fresh milk.

Text from Wikipedia

Fluffy Fruit Pie / Luftig Frukt Pai

A pie recipe from “Delicious Dairy Dishes” published in 1936fresh fruit pie_post

Evaporated milk seems to have been the chosen substitute for cream in the US most of the last century. As far as I know we have only one type here in Norway an it is aproparately enough called Vikingmelk – Ted

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