Victorian Kedgeree / Viktoriansk Kedgeree

A classic Victorian breakfast recipe found on CookIt!
Victorian Kedgeree / Viktoriansk Kedgeree

Kedgeree originated amongst the British colonials in India and was introduced to the UK as a breakfast dish in Victorian times. It is rarely eaten for breakfast these days, but is still very popular for lunch or supper.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge victorian000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Fish Soup with Cod and Tomatoes / Fiskesuppe med Torsk og Tomater

A  filling soup recipe found in “Torsk til Hverdag
og Fest” (Cod for Everydays and Party) a free cookbook  published by Godfisk!

Fish Soup with Cod and Tomatoes / Fiskesuppe med Torsk og Tomater

Cod is perfect for everyday life when time is scarce, the family is hungry and you need a healthy, quick and tasty dinner.

But cod is also perfect for party food. Put cod on the table when family or friends get together for a nice meal and a good atmosphere is guaranteed. With its firm white fish meat and its delicate flavor, the cod suits perfectly for both everydays and party.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge seafood000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Halibut with Bell Pepper Butter / Kveite med Paprikasmør

A fish recipe found in “Grillmat” (Grilled Food)
in the “Kjøkkenbiblioteket” (The Kitchen Library)
series published by Aventura Forlag in 1992
Halibut with Bell Pepper Butter / Kveite med Paprikasmør

Halibut has a delicate fish flavor that can be further enhanced with fresh bell pepper butter. You can use canned peppers if you like. Serve the fish with grilled polenta.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge barbecue000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Traditional Smoked Mackerel Fishcakes / Tradisjonelle Fiskekaker av Røkt Makrell

A classic fish cake recipe found on what was then britishfood.about.com
Traditional Smoked Mackerel Fishcakes / Tradisjonelle Fiskekaker av Røkt Makrell

Smoked fish is good in all kinds of recipes because of its deep flavour, plus it is nutritious, tasty and fairly cheap. A Smoked Mackerel Fishcake is this and more. Mackerel is not only an economical fish to cook and eat, as an oily fish it also very healthy. Most Mackerel fishing is currently sustainable, so we don’t need to feel too guilty eating it.

In this Smoked Mackerel Fishcake Recipe the fish is teamed with hard boiled egg, horseradish cream sauce and parsley which delivers a soft , sweet and extremely tasty fishcake.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge seafood000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Finnan Haddie Balls / Skotsk Blandaball med Røkt Hyse

A traditional Scotish fish dish found in “War Time Recipes”
published by The Proctor & Gamble Co in 1918
Finnan-Haddie-Balls_thumb2

Finnan haddie (also known as Finnan haddock, Finnan, Finny Haddock or Findrum speldings) is cold-smoked haddock, representative of a regional method of smoking with green wood and peat in north-east Scotland. Its origin is the subject of a debate, as some sources attribute the origin to the hamlet of Findon, Aberdeenshire, (also sometimes called Finnan) near Aberdeen, while others insist that the name is a corruption of the village name of Findhorn at the mouth of the River Findhorn in Moray.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge scottish_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Club Sandwich with Cod / Club Sandwich med Torsk

A fresh take on the club sandwich found in
“Torsk til Hverdag  og Fest” (Cod for Everydays and Parties)
a free E-book published by
Godfisk!
Club Sandwich with Cod / Club Sandwich med Torsk

Cod is perfect for everyday life when time is scarce, the family is hungry and you need a healthy, quick and tasty dinner.

But cod is also great as party food. Put cod on the table when family or friends get together for a nice meal and a good mood is guaranteed. With its firm white fish meat and its delicate flavor, the cod fits just perfectly both for everydays and parties.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge seafood000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The History of Fish and Chips

An article By Ellen Castelow, Contributing Writer at The National Federation of Fish Friers posted on Historic UK

The History of Fish and Chips

Ahh…. Fish, chips and mushy peas! There is nothing more British than fish and chips. Freshly cooked, piping hot fish and chips, smothered in salt and soused with vinegar, wrapped in newspaper and eaten out-of-doors on a cold and wintry day – it simply cannot be beaten!

So how, when and where did this quintessentially British dish come about?

The potato is thought to have been brought to England from the New World in the 17th century by Sir Walter Raleigh although it is believed that the French invented the fried potato chip.

Both Lancashire and London stake a claim to being the first to invent this famous meal – chips were a cheap, staple food of the industrial The History of Fish and Chipsnorth whilst fried fish was introduced in London’s East End. In 1839 Charles Dickens referred to a “fried fish warehouse” in his novel, ‘Oliver Twist’.

The populace soon decided that putting fried fish and chips together was a very tasty combination and so was born their national dish of fish and chips!

The first fish and chip shop in the North of England is thought to have opened in Mossely, near Oldham, Lancashire, around 1863. Mr Lees sold fish and chips from a wooden hut in the market and later he transferred the business to a permanent shop across the road which had the following inscription in the window, “This is the first fish and chip shop in the world”.

However in London, it is said that Joseph Malin opened a fish and chip shop in Cleveland Street within the sound of Bow Bells in 1860.

Fish and chip shops were originally small family businesses, often run from the ‘front room’ of the house and were commonplace by the late 19th century.

The History of Fish and Chips

Through the latter part of the 19th century and well into the 20th century, the fish and chip trade expanded greatly to satisfy the needs of the growing industrial population of Great Britain. In fact you might say that the Industrial Revolution was fuelled partly by fish and chips!

The development of the steam trawler brought fish from all over the North Atlantic, Iceland and Greenland and the steam railways allowed easy and fast distribution of the fish around the country.

Fish and chips became so essential to the diet of the ordinary man and woman that one shop in Bradford had to employ a doorman to control the queue at busy times during 1931. The Territorial Army prepared for battle on fish and chips provided in special catering tents erected at training camps in the 1930’s.

The fish and chip shop was invaluable in supplementing the family’s weekly diet in the Second World War, as fish and chips were among the few foods not to be rationed. Queues were often hours long when the word went round that the chip shop had fish!! On one occasion at Brian’s Fish and Chip Shop in Leeds, when fish was scarce, homemade fish cakes were sold – along with the confusing, and slightly worrying, warning: “Patrons: We do not recommend the use of vinegar with these fish cakes”!!

The History of Fish and Chips

So are fish and chips any good for us, nutritionally? Fish and chips are a valuable source of protein, fibre, iron and vitamins, providing a third of the recommended daily allowance of vitamins for men and nearly half for women. Magnus Pyke cites it as an example of a traditional dish once jeered at by food snobs and even censured by health food devotees but now fully appreciated as a nutritious combination.

In 1999, the British consumed nearly 300 million servings of fish and chips* – that equates to six servings for every man, woman and child in the country. There are now around 8,500 fish and chip shops* across the UK – that’s eight for every one McDonald’s outlet, making British Fish and Chips the nation’s favourite take-away.

Oven Baked Cod Masala / Ovnsbakt Torsk Masala

A spicy cod dinner recipe found in
“Torsk til Hverdag og Fest” (Cod for Everydays and Parties)
a free E-book published by Godfisk!
Oven Baked Cod Masala / Ovnsbakt Torsk Masala

Cod is perfect for everyday life when time is scarce, the family is hungry and you need a healthy, quick and tasty dinner.

But cod is also great as party food. Put cod on the table when family or friends get together for a nice meal and a good mood is guaranteed. With its firm white fish meat and its delicate flavor, cod fits just perfectly for everydays and parties.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge seafood000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Fish Soup – Basic Recipe / Fiskesuppe – Grunnoppskrift

A classic take on fish soup found in “Fisk og Skalldyr”
(Fish and Shellfish) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
Fish Soup – Basic Recipe / Fiskesuppe – Grunnoppskrift

Fish soup with vegetables is a delicacy. And it is inexpensive food because the basic broth is made from fish heads, skin and bones.

Here you got a basic recipe, which can be varied with different species of fish. For example, choose cod, haddock, pollock or whiting.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge soup_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Old-Fashioned Codfish Dinner / Gammeldags Torskemiddag

A fish dinner recipe found in “Old Gloucester Sea Food Recipes”
published by Frank E Davis Fish Company in 1932

Old-Fashioned Codfish Dinner / Gammeldags Torskemiddag

If this dish was old-fashioned back in 1932 it sure is today. An unfamiliar way to serve cod for a Scandinavian, but it does sound delicious. Apart from the beets and onion it sound a little like what we call “Plukkfisk” in Norway – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge american000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Fish and Shellfish Skewers / Fisk og Skalldyrspidd

A tempting barbecue recipe found in “God Mat fra Sjøen”
(Nice Food from the Sea) published by Gyldendal in 1984

Fish and Shellfish Skewers / Fisk og Skalldyrspidd

When Easter is over, it’s time to get the barbecue out of the shed. And why not skip the hamburger and hot dogs for once and cook some juicy seafood skewers instead.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge seafood000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Party Dressed Fish / Selskapsfin Fisk

A classic fish dinner recipe found in “Fisk og Skalldyr” (Fish and Shellfish) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980Party Dressed Fish / Selskapsfin Fisk

White fish, rice, asparagus and shrimps is a classic Scandinavian dinner dish combination and can be found in a multitude of recipes from our little part of the world. It is as the title of the post suggests classic party food. It was when this book was published in 1980 and it so absolutely still is – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge seafood000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Ragoût de Poissons Normand – Fish Ragout with Prawns / Fiskeragu med Reker

A delicious fish ragout recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in in 1980
Ragoût de Poissons Normand – Fish Ragout with Prawns / Fiskeragu med Reker

Fish soup recipes are ten a dozen but decent fish ragout recipes are scarce on the ground. This makes it all the more delightful when one as nice as this one turns up.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge seafood000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Insalata di Mare – Italian Seafood Salad / Italiensk Sjømatsalat

A delicious salad recipe found in “Ganske Enkelt –
Italiensk Kokebok” (Quite Simple – Italian Cook Book)
published  by Notabene Forlag in 1995

insalata di mare_post

If you are as fond of seafood as I am, this salad is heaven sent. It contains all the goodies from the  sea one can think of. And sprinkled with parsley, lemon juice and olive oil. The Italians really know how to put seafood on the table.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge seafood000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The History of Lutefisk

An article found on whatscookingamerica.netLutefisk_01

It is said that about half the Norwegians who immigrated to America came in order to escape the hated lutefisk and the other half came to spread the gospel of lutefisk’s wonderfulness.

– Norwegian-American saying

Lutefisk History

Lutefisk (pronounced lewd-uh-fisk) is dried cod that has been soaked in a lye solution for several days to rehydrate it.  It is rinsed with cold water to remove the lye, then boiled or baked, and then served with butter, salt, and pepper.

Lutefisk_02

The finished lutefisk usually is the consistency of Jello.  It is also called lyefish, and in the United States, Norwegian-Americans traditionally serve it for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  In many Norwegian homes, lutefisk takes the place of the Christmas turkey.  In Minnesota and Wisconsin, you can find lutefisk in local food stores and even at some restaurants. It is a food that you either love or hate, and, as some people say, “Once a year is probably enough!”

During the fall in Wisconsin, people watch their local newspapers for announcements of lutefisk suppers, which are usually held in Norwegian churches.  Usually every Norwegian church will host at least one lutefisk supper between October and the end of the year.  The dinners have become so popular that lovers of this special cod dish drive great distances, and these are not just people of Scandinavian descent.

Lutefisk_04

The history of lutefisk dates back to the Vikings.  On one occasion, according to one legend, plundering Vikings burned down a fishing village, including the wooden racks with drying cod.  The returning villagers poured water on the racks to put out the fire.  Ashes covered the dried fish, and then it rained.  The fish buried in the ashes in the ashes thus became soaked in a lye slush.  Later the villagers were surprised to see that the dried fish had changed to what looked like fresh fish.  They rinsed the fish in water to remove the lye and make it edible, and then boiled it.  The story is that one particularly brave villager tasted the fish and declared it “not bad.”

Lutefisk_03

Norwegian-Americans believe that lutefisk was brought by their ancestors on the ships when they came to America, and that it was all they had to eat.  Today the fish is celebrated in ethnic and religious celebrations and is linked with hardship and courage.


In general I love traditional Norwegian food, both the food eaten during celebrating Christmas and the traditional food eaten the year round. Having said as much that love does not embrace lutefisk, but if it is served with enough crispy bacon and mushy peas as it usually is here in Norway I do eat it.

Ted
Winking smile