French Bread / Franskbrød

A classic French bread recipe found in “The Fleischmann Treasury of Yeast Baking” published in 1962
French Bread / Franskbrød

The French call their long, slender loaves of crusty bread “pain ordiaire,” or “everyday bread.” They serve it at almost every meal, from breakfast where it accompanies the morning coffee or hot chocolate, through dinner, where it is used to “mop up” every bit of sauce or gravy.

Because of its rather bland flavour, it may accompany any main dish. Its crispness makes it a special attraction with soups, salads and soft entrees such as spaghetti or eggs. It may even appear with the dessert course when dessert is cheese and fruit.

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Boeuf Lyonaise

A classic lunch dish found  in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978

Boeuf Lyonaise

This dish is closely related to the salad Parisienne. Both are based on the same basic ingredients. The biggest difference is that one is a warm meal while the other is a cold one. The dish is excellent to turn to when you have some leftover roast beef or other types of beef.

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In context: Cattelin’s is one of the best and most reasonably priced restaurants in Stockholm. It has survived wars, disasters, and changing tastes, and still manages to pack ‘em in, so they must be doing something right. Read more here and here

Ragoût de Poissons Normand – Fish Ragout with Prawns / Fiskeragu med Reker

A delicious fish ragout recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in in 1980
Ragoût de Poissons Normand – Fish Ragout with Prawns / Fiskeragu med Reker

Fish soup recipes are ten a dozen but decent fish ragout recipes are scarce on the ground. This makes it all the more delightful when one as nice as this one turns up.

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Pork Chops Provençale / Koteletter Provençale

A French dinner recipe found in “52 Søndagsmiddager” (52 Sunday Dinners) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1983koteletter provencale_post

There is something homely and nice about pork chops. In all the changing food fashions that I’ve seen up through my life pork chops have been just like denims, impossible to kill by the people who like to tell us what we should eat or wear – Ted  😉

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Chicken in Port Wine / Kylling i Portvin

A chicken recipe from ”French Cooking” published by
Golden Appel in 1968

Chicken in Port Wine / Kylling i Portvin

I bought this book in a used book shop here in Oslo the other day. I didn’t check it very thoroughly, just made sure there was lots of colour phictures. When I got home and started to scan the book I realised that the recipes and the pictures were not on the same page at all. Irritating of course, it makes scanning a lot more time consuming.

Well, my mistake, but I’m a stubborn sod, so I scanned it anyway – Ted  😉

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Matelote Alsacienne – Fish Casserole from Alsace / Fiskegryte fra Alsace

A delicious fish recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in in 1980

Matelote Alsacienne – Fish Casserole from Alsace / Fiskegryte fra Alsace

It is not correct to use the term “cousine” of French farmhouse cooking. It is more a natural part of life. There is no Machiavellian refinements or superfluous embellishments. Wholesome, tasty, simple ingredients in dishes to suit season, climate and workload.

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Omelette aux Épinards – Spinach Omelette / Spinatomelett

A delicious omelette recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in in 1980

Omelette aux Épinards - Spinach Omelette / Spinatomelett

It is not correct to use the term “cuisine” of French farmhouse cooking. It is more a natural part of life. There is no Machiavellian refined elements or superfluous embellishments. Good, simple ingredients in tasty dishes to suit the season, climate and work.

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Chocolate Pots de Creme / Sjokolade Pots de Creme

A classic French dessert recipe found on epicurus.com
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Simply extraordinary, Chocolate Pots de Crême may be served in a variety of containers. As individual portions, they’re perfect for entertaining and easy for family sweets. These go perfectly with a nice after dinner liqueur.

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Pâté de Campagne – French Pâté / Fransk Postei

A classic French pâté recipe found in “Berømte Retter”
(Famoud Dishes) published by
Ernst G Mortensens Forlag in 1970

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The principle of a French pâtés – a mixture of meat (or fish), herbs, lard, wine etc., cooked in a casserole dish or in a puff pastry – was launched in France as early as the Middle Ages. The best and finest pâtés comes from South West France – Perigord and Armagnac. The trick to making a pâté consists in finding good harmony and balance between taste and aroma. A good pâté will not taste significantly of just one ingredient, but should be an aromatic, indefinable whole.

These pâtés are always eaten cold, it makes the favours come together the best. A pâté should preferably be made the day before it is to be served. It can be stored for up to one week in the refrigerator and served as an appetizer, an evening meal or as sandwich spread.

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French Waffles / Franske Vafler

A classic French recipe from “Dessertkaker” (Dessert Cakes) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
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They may be called waffles although they don’t look like any waffles I’ve ever seen. But trust the French to come up with a delicious dessert cake anyway. Waffles or not they certainly look good enough to eat – Ted  😉

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French Veal Chops with Calvados / Fransk Kalvekoteletter med Calvados

A great dinner recipe from “The Best of International Cooking”
published by Hamlyn in 1984

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In context: Apple orchards and brewers are mentioned as far back as the 8th century by Charlemagne. The first known Norman distillation was carried out by “Lord” de Gouberville in 1553, and the guild for cider distillation was created about 50 years later in 1606. In the 17th century, the traditional cider farms expanded, but taxation and prohibition of cider brandies were enforced elsewhere than Brittany, Maine, and Normandy.

calvados posterThe area called “Calvados” was created after the French Revolution, but eau de vie de cidre was already called calvados in common usage. In the 19th century, output increased with industrial distillation and the working class fashion for café-calva. When a phylloxera outbreak in the last quarter of the 19th century devastated the vineyards of France and Europe, calvados experienced a “golden age”.

During World War I, cider brandy was requisitioned for use in armaments due to its alcohol content. The appellation contrôlée regulations officially gave calvados a protected name in 1942.

After the war, many cider houses and distilleries were reconstructed, mainly in the Pays d’Auge. Many of the traditional farmhouse structures were replaced by modern agriculture with high output. The Calvados appellation system was revised in 1984 and 1996. Pommeau got its recognition in 1991; in 1997, an appellation for Domfront with 30% pears was created.

Pommes de Terre au Pistou – French Basil Potatoes / Franske Basilikumpoteter

A delicious potato recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in in 1980

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This is a very tasty way to prepare potatoes done in French
farmhouses and it can be served with most fried dishes.

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Lyle’s Banana, Pecan and Cinnamon French Toast / Lyles Arme Riddere med Banan, Pekannøtter og Kanel

A delicious French Toast recipe found on lylesgoldensyrup.com
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This sweet sandwich with sliced banana, chopped pecans and Lyle’s Golden Syrup is perfect for a morning treat. Tastes even better with a side of yoghurt!

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Rustic French Honey Cake / Rustikk Fransk Honningkake

A classic French cake recipe found on food52.com
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This cake is only slightly sweet. It is a cake that answers the age old question, “Is it ok to put a slab of butter on my cake?” with a definitive yes. The cake is great in the afternoon with an espresso and if it is a Saturday you might even attempt an armagnac, cognac or a sweet walnut liqueur. If you just can’t help yourself you could also add another 1/8 cup of honey.

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French Ham Plate / Fransk Skinketallerken

A Continental lunch plate recipe found in “Norsk Ukeblads
Store Salatbok” (The Norwegian Weekly Family Magazine’s
Large Salad Book) published in 1984

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