Medieval Monday – 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16de Århundre

A medieval fruit paste recipe found on Turnspit & Table
Medieval Monday - 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16ende Århundre

Kim who runs ‘Turnspit & Table‘ writes: Quince Paste is the ancestor of modern marmalade, people have been preserving quinces for a very long time. The Greeks and Romans packed them tightly into honey to make melomeli or cooked it down to a paste with honey and pepper, often recommending them as treatments for complaints of the stomach.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The History of Rowntree’s Fruit Gums & Pastilles

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_04

Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_05Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles are small round sweets measuring about 1.5 cm (0.6 in) in diameter; they have a jelly-like consistency, due to the gelatin they are made from, and are covered with sugar. They contain fruit juice, have no artificial colours or flavours, and come in five flavours: lemon (yellow), lime (green), strawberry (red), blackcurrant (purple) and orange (orange).

History

At Rowntree’s factory in Fawdon, Tyneside in 1881, Rowntree introduced Fruit Pastilles, and the product proved to be a great success, accounting for about 25 percent of the company’s tonnage by 1887.

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_06Packaging

Tubes of Fruit Pastilles are wrapped in foil-backed paper (paper on the inside, foil on the outside) with a paper wrapper over the top. The paper wrapper is green in colour with “Fruit Pastilles” written along the front in large lettering. Along the bottom of the lettering there are pictures of different types of fruit all relating to the flavours within the packet, The top bears the “Rowntree’s” brand name. Fruit Pastilles come in a small pack weighing 52.5 grams (1.85 oz), containing 14 pastilles, but are also available in larger bags weighing 180 grams (6.3 oz). They are also available in boxes and larger round cardboard tubes.

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_02Marketing and Advertising

The 1972 television advertising campaign used the song Pistol Packin’ Mama with the tag line “Pastille Pickin’ Mama, pass those pastilles round”.

To drive awareness of the 25% fruit juice recipe in Fruit Pastilles, Rowntree conducted a 105-day experimental marketing campaign. At family events, top-end grocers and service stations they invited families to join in their ‘What Can Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_03You Do But Chew?’ talent shows, tying in with the brand’s sponsorship of Britain’s Got Talent. 427,240 product samples were distributed as brand ambassadors tried to engage parents with the ‘25% fruit juice’ message. 93% of the consumers involved said they’d had a positive shift in brand perception, whilst more than half were ‘highly likely’ to purchase post campaign.[3]

A more recent TV commercial shows a man about to chew on a Fruit Pastille when he is surrounded by medieval people who declare whether he’d chew the pastille or go out on a date with a fair maiden. In the end he has to chew. The commercial concludes with the message “Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles with real fruit flavour. You can’t help but chew!”

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_01

A commercial from the 1980s has recently been revived, featuring a child daring a basketball player to not chew on a pastille. The slogan from the previous ad is still used.

Rowntree’s Fruit Gums

Roundtrees_01Rowntree’s Fruit Gums are circular sweets formerly made by Rowntree’s, who were later acquired by Nestlé. There were five flavours, each of a different colour: strawberry, orange, lemon, blackcurrant and lime. The sweets were introduced in 1893, and originally marketed as Rowntree’s Clear Gums – “The nation’s favourite sweet” – and were available in twopenny tubes and sixpenny packets.[1] In addition to the traditional roll packaging, they were available in a larger-volume box containing the sweets in the shape of the fruit or part of the fruit that the flavour represents.

Roundtrees_02Ingredients

Fruit Gums are primarily composed of glucose syrup and fruit juices and are therefore similar to wine gums (another British confectionery item). Originally the purple fruit gums were referred to as “blusterberry”, but this changed to blackcurrant in the 1990s after a failed advertising campaign.

“Don’t Forget the Fruit Gums, Mum”

An advertising campaign for the gums that ran for three years from 1958 to 1961 included the slogan “Don’t Forget the Fruit Gums, Mum”. The slogan was invented by the copywriter Roger Musgrave (1929-2007).

Roundtrees_04

The television advert featured a young boy reminding his mother to buy fruit gums as she leaves to go shopping. The advert claims that “[Fruit Gums] last all day” and that “Rowntree’s Fruit Gums last the longest”. This referred to the number of sweets in the tube.

The Christmas Recipes – Part 17

The Christmas Recipes – Part 17

 

Spice Boiled Clementines / Krydderkokte Klementiner

Spice Boiled Clementines / Krydderkokte Klementiner

Island Whisky & Fruit Cake / Karibisk Whisky & Fruktkake

Island Whisky & Fruit Cake /
Karibisk Whisky & Fruktkake

Small Succulent Fruit Cakes / Små Saftige Fruktkaker

A really juicy cake recipe found on Allers/KKSmall Succulent Fruit Cakes / Små Saftige Fruktkaker

Bake these delicious cakes in small moulds, it will make them so much nicer to put on the tea table, but you can also use two oblong cake moulds.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge baking_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The Christmas Recipes – Part 6

icon

Christmas Fruit Cake / Julens Fruktkake
Christmas Fruit Cake / Julens Fruktkake

Chocolate & Mint Toffees / Sjokolade Og Mintkarameller
Chocolate & Mint Toffees / Sjokolade Og Mintkarameller

Jane Austen’s Black Butter Jam / Jane Austens Smørbare Syltetøy

A simple but delicious jam recipe found on Bite From The Past
Jane Austens Black Butter Jam_post

The Girl who runs Bite From The Past writes: I have been dying to make this ever since I spotted it in The Jane Austen Cookbook by Maggie Black and Deirdre LeFaye.

This is the easiest jam you’ll ever make in your life-and it makes good use of leftover pieces of fruit. It’s funny to me that the instructions state this is a jam for children-probably because it’s a mixed up combination of fruit. I think it’s a wonderful addition to any biscuit or bread at tea time.

In this batch, I used strawberries, two apples that were starting to shrivel, and a couple of really ripe pears. Peel the skins off the apples and pears. You can also use peaches or plums-just be sure to blanche them first to remove the skin.

I did not can these – although you can to preserve them longer. I merely put mine in canning jars and set them in the very back of my refrigerator, where they lasted for several months!

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge literature000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Orange Ring / Appelsinrand

A delicious dessert recipe found in “Med Frukt og Bær”
(With Fruit and Berries) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

appelsinrand_post

Believe it or not dear visitor, it is quite possible to make dessert like this without the help of Jello or similar products. This recipe shows you how – Ted  😉

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

A Delicate Chewit / En Delikat Chewit

A 16th century recipe found on historyextra.com
Medieval Monday_headingA delicate chewit_post

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates a delicate chewit – a meat and fruit pie enjoyed in the 16th century.

Sam writes: Britain loves pies, and recipes for them can be found in cookbooks going back centuries. This month I’ve chosen a 16th-century pie called a chewit that mixes sweet and savoury flavours – a combination that was popular in the Tudor era. Recipes from that time often refer to coffins – robust pastry designed more to contain the filling than to be eaten. My version, including measurements, is based on a 16th-century recipe.

000_recipe_eng  traditional badge elizabethian_flat  000_recipe_nor

Mutton Mince Pie / Pai med Kjøttdeig av Lam

A savoury pie recipe found on bonappetit.com
Medieval Monday_headingMutton Mince Pie_post

A sweet-and-savory main course adapted from “The English Huswife” by Gervase Markham published i 1615.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

Traditional British Queen of Puddings / Britiske Tradisjonell Queen of Puddings

A traditional British recipe found on about.com/food/
Traditional British Queen of Puddings_britishfood.about_post

Queen of Puddings is so worthy of its name, a pudding filled with lovely ingredients and crowned with a layer of soft chewy meringue. As you can see from this recipe, it is quick and easy to make, is comforting yet not heavy.

The bottom layer of the puddings is made from eggs, milk, sugar and breadcrumbs with a topping of meringue; fruit is added either in the base of the dish or between the base and meringue; the choice is yours.

Use a thick layer of jam, any fruit preserve, a compote  of seasonal fruit, lemon or fruit curd – even marmalade. The variations of Queen of Puddings are endless. Enjoy

Queen of Puddings is also known as Monmouth Pudding and Manchester Pudding though these are ever so slightly different.

000_recipe_eng  traditional badge british_flat  000_recipe_nor

Queen Jam / Dronningsyltetøy

A classic Norwegian jam recipe found in “Sylting og Dypfrysing”
(Jam Making and Deep-freezing) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981

dronningsyltetøy_post

Back in the fifties and sixties when I was a kid most families around where we lived headed for the mountains or the woodlands to pick berries as soon as they were ripe. My family picked raspberries, lingonberries,coudberries and blueberries every year and my mom would make jams and jellies. Strawberries and apples were bought around the same time and and they ended up as jams and jellies too.

Anyone who have tasted homemade conserves like these know that they beat the shop bought stuff by a mile – Ted

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

Bohemian Livancy / Bøhmiske Livancy

A classic Central European recipe found in
“The Best of International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984

bohemian livancey_post

Livancy is a traditional pan fried cake originating from Central Europe and could be described as something in between the French crêpes and the American pancakes, except livancy are not as boring as the American pancakes and not as irritatingly posh as crêpes – they are just right.

For those who are not familiar with them, livancy are small, slightly sweetened spongy cakes which are usually served with sweet toppings. Although the recipe itself is very simple you can let your imagination run wild when it comes to these toppings. The traditional decorations are any kind of jam, whipped cream and fruit on top.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

Luxury Fruit Cake / Luksus Fruktkake

A recipe from “Formkaker” (Mouldbaked Cakes) published
by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981
luksus fruktkake_post

This fruitcake is durable. The cake can be eaten freshly made, but tastes almost better after a few days. Store the cake in refrigerator, preferably in tight box.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

The History of Lime

000_lime_01

A lime (from French lime, from Arabic līma, from Persian līmū, “lemon”) is a hybrid citrus fruit, which is typically round, lime green, 3–6 centimetres (1.2–2.4 in) in diameter, and containing acidic juice vesicles. There are several species of citrus trees whose fruits are called limes, including the Key lime (Citrus aurantifolia), Persian lime, kaffir lime, and desert lime. Limes are an excellent source of vitamin C, and are often used to accent the flavours of foods and beverages. They are grown year-round. Plants with fruit called “limes” have diverse genetic origins; limes do not form a monophyletic group.

History

000_lime_06Limes were first grown on a large scale in southern Iraq and Persia, and the fruit was first grown commercially in what is today southern Iraq (Babylonia).

To prevent scurvy during the 19th century, British sailors were issued a daily allowance of citrus, such as lemon, and later switched to lime. The use of citrus was initially a closely guarded military secret, as scurvy was a common scourge of various national navies, and the ability to remain at sea for lengthy periods without contracting the disorder was a huge benefit for the military. The British sailor thus acquired the nickname, “Limey” because of their usage of limes.

000_lime_03Lime juice may be squeezed from fresh limes, or purchased in bottles in both unsweetened and sweetened varieties. Lime juice is used to make limeade, and as an ingredient (typically as sour mix) in many cocktails.

Lime pickles are an integral part of Indian cuisine. South Indian cuisine is heavily based on lime; having either lemon pickle or lime pickle is considered an essential of Onam Sadhya.

Uses

In cooking, lime is valued both for the acidity of its juice and the floral aroma of its zest. It is a common ingredient in authentic Mexican, Vietnamese and Thai dishes. It is also used for its pickling properties in ceviche. Some guacamole recipes call for lime juice.

000_lime_05

The use of dried limes (called black lime or loomi) as a flavouring is typical of Persian cuisine and Iraqi cuisine, as well as in Gulf-style baharat (a spice mixture that is also called kabsa or kebsa).

Lime is an ingredient of many cuisines from India, and many varieties of pickles are made, e.g. sweetened lime pickle, salted pickle, and lime chutney.

000_lime_02

Key lime gives the character flavoring to the American dessert known as Key lime pie. In Australia, desert lime is used for making marmalade.

000_lime_04

Lime is an ingredient in several highball cocktails, often based on gin, such as gin and tonic, the gimlet and the Rickey. Freshly squeezed lime juice is also considered a key ingredient in margaritas, although sometimes lemon juice is substituted.

Lime extracts and lime essential oils are frequently used in perfumes, cleaning products, and aromatherapy.

Text from Wikipedia

Home Made Norwegian Cordials

I’ve posted a lot of different porridge recipes on this blog and what we usually drink with these porridge here is a drink made from either shop bought or homemade cordials. Every Norwegian grocer will have a wide range of cordials for sale.

In my childhhod, back in the fifties and sixties this was a usual drink for kids for any kind of meal really, sodas was just for special occations back then and home made cordials was quite common.

saftThese cordials could be made from a lot of different berries or fruits; plums, cherries, rhubarb, black currants, red currants, blueberries, raspberries and strawberries and more seldom cranberries or combinations of several of these. And most homes had a special kind of pan for making cordials, a lot still have and make cordials every autumn.

Both blueberry and black currant cordials served as a hot toddy are still believed to have a healing effect on the common cold. And when I was a kid one could buy hot black currant toddy at any given winter sport arrangement. And in my childhood all boys and girls were well behaved if promised “saft og boller” – cold drinks made with cordials and fresh buns.

Cordials have other uses than drink of course, they are great for making sorbets, dessert sauces, adding taste to home made ice cream and cakes. Besides they make a very good basis for liqueurs if you are short of time.

Cordial Pan

saftkoker

The cordial pan is stacked like this; (1) at the bottom, (2) on top of that with (3) inside of that and (4) on the top. Steam from water boiling in (1) reaches the berries and fruit through the holes in (3) and raw cordial drips down into (2) and can be poured out via (5) which can be closed and open as needed.

What you get out of the cordial pan is called “råsaft” (raw cordial) and can be frozen for further use. To make real cordial you have to cook the raw cordial with sugar and a little wine acid. Both sugar and wine acid will work as conserving agents and will make the cordial keep for ages.