Pears On the Camp Fire / Pærer på Bålet

A dessert recipe found on Dagbladet.no/mat/heading_campfire_thumb2_thumbPears On the Camp Fire / Pærer på Bålet

One should always bring some fruit on a hike or camping trip so why not try your hand at this delicious hot dessert. A two ingredients recipe, it just couldn’t be more simple.

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Chocolate Plunge / Sjokolade Dip

A hot chocolate dip recipe found on an ad for
Karo and Baker’s published in 1987

Chocolate Plunge / Sjokolade Dip

Indulge in a little hot chocolate, syrup and cream dip during Easter and rescue your conscience by dipping nothing but fresh fruit

Ted
Winking smile

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The History of Pineapples

The History of Pineapples

It is not a pine nor an apple, and it is not native to Hawaii. However, since it was first canned and became a major crop there, we associate pineapple with Hawaii and the tastes of the islands. It has wonderful tenderizing enzymes and goes especially well with pork as well as, seafood, and sweet-and-sour dishes. Of course, there are always plenty of dessert recipes using pineapple.

Pineapple History

The History of PineapplesAnanas comosus is the botanical name of the fruit we know as the pineapple.

Native to South America, it was named for its resemblance to a pine cone. The term pineapple (or pinappel in Middle English) did not appear in English print until around 1664.

Christopher Columbus is credited with discovering the pineapple on the island of Guadeloupe in 1493, although the fruit had long been grown in South America. He called it piña de Indes meaning “pine of the Indians.”

The History of PineapplesSouth American Guarani Indians cultivated pineapples for food. They called it nanã, meaning “excellent fruit.”

Another explorer, Magellan, is credited with finding pineapples in Brazil in 1519, and by 1555, the luscious fruit was being exported with gusto to England. It soon spread to India, Asia, and the West Indies.

When George Washington tasted pineapple in 1751 in Barbados, he declared it his favorite tropical fruit. Although the pineapple thrived in Florida, it was still a rarity for most Americans.

Captain James Cook later introduced the pineapple to Hawaii circa 1770.

However, commercial cultivation did not begin until the 1880s when steamships made transporting the perishable fruit viable.

The History of Pineapples

In 1903, James Drummond Dole began canning pineapple, making it easily accessible worldwide. Production stepped up dramatically when a new machine automated the skinning and coring of the fruit.

The Dole Hawaiian Pineapple Company was a booming business by 1921, making pineapple Hawaii’s largest crop and industry.

Today, Hawaii produces only ten percent of the world’s pineapple crops. Other countries contributing to the pineapple industry include Mexico, Honduras, Dominican Republic, Philippines, Thailand, Costa Rica, China, and Asia.

The History of Pineapples

Pineapple is the third most canned fruit behind applesauce and peaches.

Text from thespruce.com

Apple, Lemon and Ricotta Pancakes / Eple, Sitron og Ricotta Pannekaker

A fresh acidic breakfast recipe found on “Healthy Recipes with Dairy Food” a free e-book published by Dairy AustraliaApple, Lemon and Ricotta Pancakes / Eple, Sitron og Ricotta Pannekaker

Kickstart the day with these refreshing acidic pancakes topped with fresh fruits and a lemon-ricotta cream. With a few cups of Assam this should easily keep you going till lunchtime.

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Granola Pancakes with Bacon / Müslipannekaker med Bacon

A delicious breakfast recipe found on gilde.no
Granola Pancakes with Bacon / Müslipannekaker med Bacon

Pancakes for breakfast gets even better with bacon. The combination of sweet and salty is unbeatable.

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Medieval Monday – 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16de Århundre

Some content on this page was disabled on April 6, 2017 as a result of a DMCA takedown notice from Kim Connor. You can learn more about the DMCA here:

https://en.support.wordpress.com/copyright-and-the-dmca/

The History of Rowntree’s Fruit Gums & Pastilles

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_04

Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_05Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles are small round sweets measuring about 1.5 cm (0.6 in) in diameter; they have a jelly-like consistency, due to the gelatin they are made from, and are covered with sugar. They contain fruit juice, have no artificial colours or flavours, and come in five flavours: lemon (yellow), lime (green), strawberry (red), blackcurrant (purple) and orange (orange).

History

At Rowntree’s factory in Fawdon, Tyneside in 1881, Rowntree introduced Fruit Pastilles, and the product proved to be a great success, accounting for about 25 percent of the company’s tonnage by 1887.

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_06Packaging

Tubes of Fruit Pastilles are wrapped in foil-backed paper (paper on the inside, foil on the outside) with a paper wrapper over the top. The paper wrapper is green in colour with “Fruit Pastilles” written along the front in large lettering. Along the bottom of the lettering there are pictures of different types of fruit all relating to the flavours within the packet, The top bears the “Rowntree’s” brand name. Fruit Pastilles come in a small pack weighing 52.5 grams (1.85 oz), containing 14 pastilles, but are also available in larger bags weighing 180 grams (6.3 oz). They are also available in boxes and larger round cardboard tubes.

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_02Marketing and Advertising

The 1972 television advertising campaign used the song Pistol Packin’ Mama with the tag line “Pastille Pickin’ Mama, pass those pastilles round”.

To drive awareness of the 25% fruit juice recipe in Fruit Pastilles, Rowntree conducted a 105-day experimental marketing campaign. At family events, top-end grocers and service stations they invited families to join in their ‘What Can Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_03You Do But Chew?’ talent shows, tying in with the brand’s sponsorship of Britain’s Got Talent. 427,240 product samples were distributed as brand ambassadors tried to engage parents with the ‘25% fruit juice’ message. 93% of the consumers involved said they’d had a positive shift in brand perception, whilst more than half were ‘highly likely’ to purchase post campaign.[3]

A more recent TV commercial shows a man about to chew on a Fruit Pastille when he is surrounded by medieval people who declare whether he’d chew the pastille or go out on a date with a fair maiden. In the end he has to chew. The commercial concludes with the message “Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles with real fruit flavour. You can’t help but chew!”

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_01

A commercial from the 1980s has recently been revived, featuring a child daring a basketball player to not chew on a pastille. The slogan from the previous ad is still used.

Rowntree’s Fruit Gums

Roundtrees_01Rowntree’s Fruit Gums are circular sweets formerly made by Rowntree’s, who were later acquired by Nestlé. There were five flavours, each of a different colour: strawberry, orange, lemon, blackcurrant and lime. The sweets were introduced in 1893, and originally marketed as Rowntree’s Clear Gums – “The nation’s favourite sweet” – and were available in twopenny tubes and sixpenny packets.[1] In addition to the traditional roll packaging, they were available in a larger-volume box containing the sweets in the shape of the fruit or part of the fruit that the flavour represents.

Roundtrees_02Ingredients

Fruit Gums are primarily composed of glucose syrup and fruit juices and are therefore similar to wine gums (another British confectionery item). Originally the purple fruit gums were referred to as “blusterberry”, but this changed to blackcurrant in the 1990s after a failed advertising campaign.

“Don’t Forget the Fruit Gums, Mum”

An advertising campaign for the gums that ran for three years from 1958 to 1961 included the slogan “Don’t Forget the Fruit Gums, Mum”. The slogan was invented by the copywriter Roger Musgrave (1929-2007).

Roundtrees_04

The television advert featured a young boy reminding his mother to buy fruit gums as she leaves to go shopping. The advert claims that “[Fruit Gums] last all day” and that “Rowntree’s Fruit Gums last the longest”. This referred to the number of sweets in the tube.

The Christmas Recipes – Part 17

The Christmas Recipes – Part 17

 

Spice Boiled Clementines / Krydderkokte Klementiner

Spice Boiled Clementines / Krydderkokte Klementiner

Island Whisky & Fruit Cake / Karibisk Whisky & Fruktkake

Island Whisky & Fruit Cake /
Karibisk Whisky & Fruktkake

Small Succulent Fruit Cakes / Små Saftige Fruktkaker

A really juicy cake recipe found on Allers/KKSmall Succulent Fruit Cakes / Små Saftige Fruktkaker

Bake these delicious cakes in small moulds, it will make them so much nicer to put on the tea table, but you can also use two oblong cake moulds.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 6

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Christmas Fruit Cake / Julens Fruktkake
Christmas Fruit Cake / Julens Fruktkake

Chocolate & Mint Toffees / Sjokolade Og Mintkarameller
Chocolate & Mint Toffees / Sjokolade Og Mintkarameller

Jane Austen’s Black Butter Jam / Jane Austens Smørbare Syltetøy

A simple but delicious jam recipe found on Bite From The Past
Jane Austens Black Butter Jam_post

The Girl who runs Bite From The Past writes: I have been dying to make this ever since I spotted it in The Jane Austen Cookbook by Maggie Black and Deirdre LeFaye.

This is the easiest jam you’ll ever make in your life-and it makes good use of leftover pieces of fruit. It’s funny to me that the instructions state this is a jam for children-probably because it’s a mixed up combination of fruit. I think it’s a wonderful addition to any biscuit or bread at tea time.

In this batch, I used strawberries, two apples that were starting to shrivel, and a couple of really ripe pears. Peel the skins off the apples and pears. You can also use peaches or plums-just be sure to blanche them first to remove the skin.

I did not can these – although you can to preserve them longer. I merely put mine in canning jars and set them in the very back of my refrigerator, where they lasted for several months!

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Orange Ring / Appelsinrand

A delicious dessert recipe found in “Med Frukt og Bær”
(With Fruit and Berries) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

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Believe it or not dear visitor, it is quite possible to make dessert like this without the help of Jello or similar products. This recipe shows you how – Ted  😉

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A Delicate Chewit / En Delikat Chewit

A 16th century recipe found on historyextra.com
Medieval Monday_headingA delicate chewit_post

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates a delicate chewit – a meat and fruit pie enjoyed in the 16th century.

Sam writes: Britain loves pies, and recipes for them can be found in cookbooks going back centuries. This month I’ve chosen a 16th-century pie called a chewit that mixes sweet and savoury flavours – a combination that was popular in the Tudor era. Recipes from that time often refer to coffins – robust pastry designed more to contain the filling than to be eaten. My version, including measurements, is based on a 16th-century recipe.

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Mutton Mince Pie / Pai med Kjøttdeig av Lam

A savoury pie recipe found on bonappetit.com
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A sweet-and-savory main course adapted from “The English Huswife” by Gervase Markham published i 1615.

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Traditional British Queen of Puddings / Britiske Tradisjonell Queen of Puddings

A traditional British recipe found on about.com/food/
Traditional British Queen of Puddings_britishfood.about_post

Queen of Puddings is so worthy of its name, a pudding filled with lovely ingredients and crowned with a layer of soft chewy meringue. As you can see from this recipe, it is quick and easy to make, is comforting yet not heavy.

The bottom layer of the puddings is made from eggs, milk, sugar and breadcrumbs with a topping of meringue; fruit is added either in the base of the dish or between the base and meringue; the choice is yours.

Use a thick layer of jam, any fruit preserve, a compote  of seasonal fruit, lemon or fruit curd – even marmalade. The variations of Queen of Puddings are endless. Enjoy

Queen of Puddings is also known as Monmouth Pudding and Manchester Pudding though these are ever so slightly different.

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