Salt Beef on Rye Bread with Mustard Sauce / Salt Oksekjøtt på Rugbrød med Sennepssaus

A canapé recipe found on BBCgoodfood
Salt Beef on Rye Bread with Mustard Sauce / Salt Oksekjøtt på Rugbrød med Sennepssaus

This quick canapé of traditional Jewish salt beef with a twist has the wow factor despite taking only minutes to make

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Hungarian Chops / Ungarske Koteletter

A Hungarian speciality from “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before)  published by
Skandinavisk Presse in 1977

Hungarian Chops / Ungarske Koteletter

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Boston Bean Sandwiches / Doble Smørbrød med Moste Bønner

A sandwich recipe from “Thrifty New Tips on a
Grand Old Favorite” published by H J Heinz Co in 1932
Boston Bean Sandwiches / Doble Smørbrød med Moste Bønner

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Sandwich Copenhagen / Smörgås Köpenhamn

A classic scandinavian sandwich recipe found in “Stora boken om Smörgåsar & Smörgåstortor” (The Big Book about Sanwiches and Sandwich Cakes) utgitt i 1985Sandwich Copenhagen / Smörgås Köpenhamn

This sandwich is typical for the lavish sandwiches one can get
at cafes and restaurants in Copenhagen

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Green Peppers with Salmon Filling / Grønn Paprika med Laksefyll

A starter/lunch recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon”
published by Alaska Packers’ Association in 1900

Green Peppers with Salmon Filling / Grønn Paprika med Laksefyll

The Alaska Packers’ Association (APA) was a San Francisco based manufacturer of Alaska canned salmon founded in 1891 and sold in 1982. As the largest salmon packer in Alaska, the member canneries of APA were active in local affairs, and had considerable political influence. The Alaska Packers’ Association is best known for operating the “Star Fleet,” the last fleet of commercial sailing vessels on the West Coast of North America, as late as 1927.

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Part of the fleet in Oakland Creek in March 1923

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Campfire Potatoes / Bålbakte potetskiver

A potato recipe fond on allrecipes.com
Campfire Potatoes / Bålbakte potetskiver

A simple yet tasty way to prepare potatoes by the campfire while
the rest of the meal is prepared in the frying pan.

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History in a Jar -The Story of Pickles

An article by Tori Avey published on The History Kitchen in 2014

tigriscleopatraIt is rumored that they were one of Cleopatra’s prized beauty secrets. They make apperances in the Bible and in Shakespeare’s writing. Pregnant women have been known to crave them along with ice cream. Pickles have been around for thousands of years, dating as far back as 2030 BC when cucumbers from their native India were pickled in the Tigris Valley. The word “pickle” comes from the Dutch pekel or northern German pókel, meaning “salt” or Shakespeare“brine,” two very important components in the pickling process. Throughout history pickling was a necessity, as it was the best way to preserve food for a long period of time. As one of the earliest mobile foods, pickles filled the stomachs of hungry sailors and travelers, while also providing families with a source of food during the cold winter months.

Pickles are created by immersing fresh fruits or vegetables in an acidic liquid or saltwater brine until they are no longer considered raw or vulnerable to spoilage. When we think of pickles, cucumbers commonly come to mind. Pickled cucumbers are often lacto-fermented in saltwater brine. During this process lactic microbial organisms develop, which turn the naturally occurring sugars of foods into lactic acid. In turn, the environment becomes acidic quickly, making it impossible for any spoiling bacteria to multiply. Cucumber pickles can also be made with a salt and vinegar brine, a popular choice for home cooks. The brine, known as “pickle juice,” is sometimes used by athletes to treat dehydration, though it has yet to be proven as a true remedy.

pickles

Kosher dills have a unique history of their own. In The Book of Jewish Food, Claudia Roden explains that pickled vegetables were a dietary staple for Jews living in the Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Russia. The sharp flavor of pickles proved a welcome addition to the bland bread-and-potato diet of these cold weather countries. For several generations, it was an autumn custom for Ashkenazim to fill barrels with cucumbers, beets and shredded cabbage. The mixture was left to ferment in a warm place for several weeks, then relocated to cool, dark cellars. The pickles would last through the long cold winter until spring, when new crops of fresh produce were available.

New York 1900When a heavy influx of eastern European Jews arrived in New York City during the late 1800s and early 1900s, immigrants introduced kosher dill pickles to America. Cucumbers were washed, then piled in large wooden barrels along with dill, garlic, spices, kosher salt and clean water. They were left to ferment for a few weeks to several months; shorter fermenting time produced brighter green “half sours,” while longer fermentation resulted in “full sours.” Pickles were sold on pushcarts in the immigrant tenement district of New York City. Over time, Jewish-owned shops selling pickles straight out of the barrel began appearing in droves. Eventually, pickling became a profitable business within the Jewish community. Today, a plate of pickles is usually served complimentary with a meal at the best Jewish delis.

masonHome pickling was made much easier and more sanitary during the 1850s, when two essential canning tools were invented. First, a Scottish chemist by the name of James Young created paraffin wax, which helped to create a seal for food preserved in jars. A few years later, John Mason developed and patented the first Mason jar. Mason’s jars were made from a heavyweight glass that was able to tolerate the high temperatures used in canning and processing pickles.

Of course, pickles aren’t limited to the dill and cucumber variety. They can be sweet, sour, salty, hot or all of the above. Pickles can be made with cauliflower, radishes, onions, green beans, asparagus and a seemingly endless variety of other vegetables and fruits. When the English arrived in the New World, they brought their method for creating sweet pickles with vinegar, sugar and spiced syrup. Eastern Europeans introduced various forms of lacto-fermented cabbage, known as sauerkraut. The French serve tiny, spiced cornichons with heavy pâtés and pungent cheeses. In the Middle East pickles are served with every meal, from peppers to olives to lemons. Russians pickle tomatoes, among other things. Koreans have their kimchi, the Japanese pickle plums and daikon, and Italians pickle eggplants and peppers. Each area of the world has its own beloved variety of pickle.

Boston Bean Sandwich / Sandwich med Bakte Bønner

A snack recipe found in “Thrifty New Tips on a Grand Old Favorite” published by  H J Heinz Co in 1932Boston Bean Sandwich / Sandwich med Bakte Bønner

The English author and singer/songwriter Michael Harding say on an intro to one of the songs on one of his records “Beans are bad at the best of times”. Although I’m a big fan I can’t quite agree with him there, I’m actually quite fond of beans – Ted

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Gypsy Goulash / Sigøynergulasj

A typical sixties dish found in an additional attachment to
“Husmorens Kokebok” published by Norsk Kunstforlag in 1963
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Comment from the author of the cookbook: The name of this dish is from ancient times when the gypsies made goulash under primitive conditions.

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Oriental Turkey Soup / Orientalsk Kalkunsuppe

An Asian inspired soup recipe found on
“The Quick & Eary  Armour Cookbook” published by 
the Benjamin Company in 1980

Oriental Turkey Soup / Orientalsk Kalkunsuppe

I can’t help spotting gherkins on the picture even though it is not mentioned in the recipe so the choice is yours, trust the picture or the recipe. In my opinion you can never go wrong with gherkins, I simply love the stuff

Ted
Winking smile

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Swedish Beet Soup / Rödbetssoppa

A traditional Swedish vegetable soup recipe
found on
 godmat.org
Swedish Beet Soup / Rödbetssoppa

It is so nice when the first beets are harvested and you can eat them lightly cooked with a dollop of butter. When they have lost their news value it’s time for soup. This recipe is traditional, but if you want to add an extra spark, serve it with freshly grated horseradish, this lovely gastronomic booster.

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Gratined Hot Dogs / Gratinerte Grillpølser

3 delicious hot dog recipes found on  gilde.no
Gratined Hot Dogs / Gratinerte Grillpølser

Get in a great Saturday afternoon mood with these gratined hot dogs in three different varieties.

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Lamb in Yogurt Sauce / Lam i Yoghurtsaus

A clamb recipe found in “Gryteretter” (Casseroles)
by Jennie Reekie published in Norwegian in 1977
Lamb in Yogurt Sauce / Lam i Yoghurtsaus

The lamb yogurt combination is known from a lot of different
cousins. We know it from Greece, North Africa the Indian subcontinent
and several other places. The book gives no clue to where this recipe comes from but an educated guess might place it in Northern Africa

Ted
Winking smile

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New York Reuben / New York Reuben Sandwich

A sandwich recipe found in “2012 Australian Grand Dairy Awards Best of the Best Cookbook” published by Dairy Australia
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The Reuben sandwich is an American hot sandwich composed of corned beef, Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and Russian dressing, grilled between slices of rye bread. Several variants exist.

Possible origins

Reuben Kulakofsky, Blackstone Hotel, Omaha, Nebraska

The most widely accepted origin holds that Reuben Kulakofsky (his first name sometimes spelled Reubin; his last name sometimes shortened to Kay), a Jewish Lithuanian-born grocer residing in Omaha, Blackstone HotelNebraska, was the inventor, perhaps as part of a group effort by members of Kulakofsky’s weekly poker game held in the Blackstone Hotel from around 1920 through 1935.

The participants, who nicknamed themselves “the committee”, included the hotel’s owner, Charles Schimmel. The sandwich first gained local fame when Schimmel put it on the Blackstone’s lunch menu, and its fame spread when a former employee of the hotel won a national contest with the recipe. In Omaha, March 14 was proclaimed as Reuben Sandwich Day.

Reuben’s Delicatessen: New York City

Reuben's DelicatessenAnother account holds that the Reuben’s creator was Arnold Reuben, the German-Jewish owner of the famed Reuben’s Delicatessen (1908 – 2001) in New York City. According to an interview with Craig Claiborne, Arnold Reuben invented the “Reuben Special” around 1914. The earliest references in print to the sandwich are New York–based, but that is not conclusive evidence, though the fact that the earliest, in a 1926 issue of Theatre Magazine, references a “Reuben Special”, does seem to take its cue from Arnold Reuben’s menu.

Marjorie RambeauA variation of the above account is related by Bernard Sobel in his 1953 book, Broadway Heartbeat: Memoirs of a Press Agent. Sobel states that the sandwich was an extemporaneous creation for Marjorie Rambeau inaugurated when the famed Broadway actress visited the Reuben’s Delicatessen one night when the cupboards were particularly bare.

Some sources name the actress in the above account as Annette Seelos, not Marjorie Rambeau, while also noting that the original “Reuben Special” sandwich of 1926 did not contain corned beef or sauerkraut and was not grilled.

Still other versions give credit to Alfred Scheuing, a chef at Reuben’s Delicatessen, and say he created the sandwich for Reuben’s son, Arnold Jr., in the 1930s.

Spiced Beef Sandwich / Krydret Oksekjøttsandwich

A classic British pub fare recipe found on delish.com
Spiced Beef Sandwich / Krydret Oksekjøttsandwich

Tender spiced beef is great to have on hand for lunch or a quick snack, with pickles and coleslaw. This dish is part of British pub fare menu. Allow plenty of time: this needs several days to marinate and at least 7 hours of cooking time before serving.

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