Ploughman’s Picnic Loaf / Pløyerens Piknikloff

A picnic loaf recipe found on tescorealfood.com
Ploughman’s Picnic Loaf / Pløyerens Piknikloff

It is still high season for picnics here on the northern hemisphere so if the weather is agreeable there is no reason to sit down indoors to have lunch. Pack the lunch and find yourself a nice peaceful spot. Remember winter is back in just a few months – Ted

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Breakfast Sandwich with Fried Egg / Frokostsmørbrød med Speilegg

A delicious breakfast idea found on meny.no
Breakfast Sandwich with Fried Egg / Frokostsmørbrød med Speilegg

This is a sandwich perfect for a full breakfast! Buy half-baked bread and make a sandwich of fresh bread with aioli, Provence ham, finely chopped spring onions, cherry tomatoes and toped it all with a fried egg for each. Simple and fast breakfast, but very good.

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Chicken Rolls Special / Kyllingrulade Spesial

A delicious lunch recipe found in “Crisco’s Good Cooking
Made Easy Cook Book” published by Procter & Gamble in 1978
Chicken Rolls Special / Kyllingrulade Spesial

Crisco is a brand of shortening produced by The J.M. Smucker Company popular in the United States. Introduced in June 1911 by Procter & Gamble, it was the first shortening to be made entirely of vegetable oil. Additional products marketed by Smucker under the Crisco brand include a cooking spray, various olive oils, and other cooking oils, including canola, corn, peanut, olive, sunflower, vegetable and blended oils

If you’re living outside the US you can get hold of Crisco
at
My American Market if you want to try it in a typical
American recipe
Ted

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Baked Stuffed Tomatoes / Bakte Fylte Tomater

A lunch recipe found in “60 ways to Serve Star Ham”
published by  Armour Co in 1930

Baked Stuffed Tomatoes / Bakte Fylte Tomater

Text from the booklet: The only real rival of “Star” Ham is Armour’s “Star” Bacon. In uniform quality it is equally dependable for it has the same famous Fixed* Flavor. The mildness and sweetness of this choicest bacon are distinctive, As a breakfast delicacy, it is admittedly unsurpassed. Wherever finest foods are served – on dining cars, in prominent hotels and elsewhere – it is a familiar item on the menus.

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Corn Pie / Maispai

A tasty pie recipe found in “Ost i Varme og Kalde Retter”
(Cheese in Hot and Cold Dishes) published by
Den Norske Bokklubb in 1988
Corn Pie / Maispai

A pie with an American touch since corn is not the most common ingredient in pies here in Scandinavia.

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Chef’s Sandwich / Kokkens Sandwich

A classic sandwich recipe found in “The Quick & Eary Armour Cookbook” published by Benjamin Company/Rutledge Book
in 1980

Chef’s Sandwich / Kokkens Sandwich

The picnic season is drawing near even here in Norway and this recipe is well worth remembering when you pack the the late spring’s first picknic basket.

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Split Pea & Ham Soup / Gul Ertesuppe med Skinke

A recipe for a warming, filling soup found on oxo.co.ukSplit Pea & Ham Soup / Gul Ertesuppe med SkinkeSplit Pea & Ham Soup / Gul Ertesuppe med Skinke

This recipe is English, but it might just as well have been Norwegian. I’ve eaten many a bowl of soup like this in my childhood and I stil make it ever so often. You might safely say it is one of my favourite soups – Ted

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Ham Hash with Poached Eggs / Hakket Skinke med Porsjerte Egg

A lunch recipe found in “60 Ways to Serve Ham” published
by Armour & Company in 1930
Ham Hash with Poached Eggs / Hakket Skinke med Porsjerte Egg

Armour & Company published a series of these cookbooks promoting their hams and bacon  in the 1920s and 1930s, all with very artistic illustrations like this one. If you like to download this cook book in pdf format, click the title below.

‘60 Ways to Serve Ham’

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Wholemeal Crescents with Cheese and Ham / Grove Horn med Ost og Skinke

A popular Scandinavian yeast bakery recipe found on joker.no
212_grove horn med ost og skinke_post

Crescents like these, fine or wholemeal, filled or not are very popular in Scandinavia and can be bought at most bakers and large grocers. More often than not you can buy them spread with cheese or cheese and ham at most cafés here too.

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Calzone al Prosciutto Cotto Affumicato – Calzone with Ham and Apples / Calzone med Skinke og Eple

A calzone from ”Pizza” a book in the “Kjøkkenbiblioteket”  (Kitchen Library) series published by Aventura Forlag in 1992.
Calzone al Prosciutto Cotto Affumicato

This recipe originates from the Alto Adige region in northern Italy. Feel free to substitute ham with other types of pork. But do not cut out horseradish, it brings out a lot of flavor from the meat and apples. One variation is to form the calzone with an open top.

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Emmenthaler Fish / Emmenthaler-Fisk

A fish dinner recipe found in “Fisk og Skalldyr” (Fish and Shellfish) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980 Emmenthaler-fisk_post

Breaded panfried or deepfried white fish filled with emmenthaler cheese and ham served with potato salad white bread and a fresh salad sounds great to me

Ted
Smile

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Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

A youth party suggestion with menu and recipes found in
“Vi Skal Ha Gjester” (We’re Having Guests)
published by Johan Grundt Tanum Forlag in 1969

Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

I found working with the last post so entertaining that I just had to do another post from the same book although both are more more work than most posts. Because if you think arranging a party for your young ones would provide less problems than serving crabs to a couple of friends you are absolutely mistaken.

The set of worries maybe different, but the chance of ending with egg on your face was indeed present. And all the worries about what would happen to your furniture and floors came on top of that.


I was sixteen in 1969 and I must admit that the parties I went to back then were home-alone-parties that didn’t have the slightest likeness to the parties described in this book. If not totally Sex Drugs & Rock’n’Roll we were close enough.

Ted
Winking smile

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Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

A classic salad recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980

Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

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Lucien OlivierThe original version of the salad was invented in the 1860s by a cook of Belgian origin, Lucien Olivier, the chef of the Hermitage, one of Moscow’s most celebrated restaurants. Olivier’s salad quickly became immensely popular with Hermitage regulars, and became the restaurant’s signature dish.

The HermitageThe exact recipe — particularly that of the dressing — was a jealously guarded secret, but it is known that the salad contained grouse, veal tongue, caviar, lettuce, crayfish tails, capers, and smoked duck, although it is possible that the recipe was varied seasonally. The original Olivier dressing was a type of mayonnaise, made with French wine vinegar, mustard, and Provençal olive oil; its exact recipe, however, remains unknown.

At the turn of the 20th century, one of Olivier’s sous-chefs, Ivan Ivanov, attempted to steal the recipe. While preparing the dressing one evening in solitude, as was his custom, Olivier was suddenly called away on some emergency. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Ivanov sneaked into Olivier’s private kitchen and observed his mise en place, which allowed him to make reasonable assumptions about the recipe of Olivier’s famed dressing.

Ivanov then left Olivier’s employ and went to work as a chef for Moskva, a somewhat inferior restaurant, where he began to serve a suspiciously similar salad under the name “capital salad” (Russian: столичный, tr. stolichny). It was reported by the gourmands of the time, however, that the dressing on the stolichny salad was of a lower quality than Olivier’s, meaning that it was “missing something.”

Later, Ivanov sold the recipe for the salad to various publishing houses, which further contributed to its popularization. Due to the closure of the Hermitage restaurant in 1905, and the Olivier family’s subsequent departure from Russia, the salad could now be referred to as “Olivier.”

One of the first printed recipes for Olivier salad, by Aleksandrova, appearing in 1894, called for half a hazel grouse, two potatoes, one small cucumber (or a large cornichon), 3-4 lettuce leaves, 3 large crayfish tails, 1/4 cup cubed aspic, 1 teaspoon of capers, 3–5 olives, and 1 12 tablespoon Provençal dressing (mayonnaise).

As often happens with gourmet recipes which become popular, the ingredients that were rare, expensive, seasonal, or difficult to prepare were gradually replaced with cheaper and more readily available foods.

Hot Gipsy Tartlets / Varme Sigøyner-Tarteletter

A traditional gipsy recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Scandinavisk Presse in 1977

Hot Gipsy Tartlets / Varme Sigøyner-Tarteletter

Gypsy cuisine has been called “the little known soul food”. Gypsies have a rich and complicated identity and history, which is reflected in the delicious complexity of the food, and, like most things, it’s a lot better when you understand it. First, the word “Gypsy” is the term that gadjé (Rromanes for non-Romani people) have used to refer to Roma, the ethnic group originating in India around the eleventh century.

Gypsies divide food into two categories: “ordinary” and “auspicious” or “lucky” (baxtalo). Auspicious foods are believed to be particularly healthy for the body and soul, and these beliefs are likely rooted in Ayurveda, the traditional Hindu system of medicine that uses food, herbs, and yogic breathing to balance the body.

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Poacher’s Pie / Tjuvjeger Pai

En classic British pie recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Poacher’s Pie / Tjuvjeger Pai

This recipe goes back a long time but was still popular amomg middel class Brits in the thirties as their dinner habits still was rather conservative back then.

By the 1950’s, poacher’s pie had become a working class dish and used cheaper ingredients, such as just sausage meat, and was cooked with only a top made of mashed potatoes.

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