Lamb and Potato Skewers / Lammekjøtt og Poteter på Spidd

A barbecue recipe found in “Grillmat” (Grilled Food)
in the“Kjøkkenbiblioteket” (The Kitchen Library) series
published by Aventura Forlag in 1992
Lamb and Potato Skewers / Lammekjøtt og Poteter på Spidd

Meat and small new potatoes can be thread on the same skewer if the potatoes are boiled a little in advance. Beef can be grilled in the same way. If you have straight, small branches of rosemary, about 20 cm / 8 inche long, these can be used as skewers. Let them lay in water 2 hours before grilling, it makes for dramatic and unusual barbeque.

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A Type of Ahrash – Spiced Meat Patties with a Sauce / Krydrede Kjøttkaker med Saus

A 13th Century Arabic pattie recipe found on “Let Hem Boyle
A Type of Ahrash – Spiced Meat Patties with a Sauce / Krydrede Kjøttkaker med Saus

Saara who runs ‘Let Hem Boyle’  writes: This is the recipe that was used by Sayyid Abu al-Hasan and others in Morocco, and they called it isfîriyâ.

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Lamb in Yogurt Sauce / Lam i Yoghurtsaus

A clamb recipe found in “Gryteretter” (Casseroles)
by Jennie Reekie published in Norwegian in 1977
Lamb in Yogurt Sauce / Lam i Yoghurtsaus

The lamb yogurt combination is known from a lot of different
cousins. We know it from Greece, North Africa the Indian subcontinent
and several other places. The book gives no clue to where this recipe comes from but an educated guess might place it in Northern Africa

Ted
Winking smile

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Roganjhost – Mild Lamb Curry / Mild Lammekarri

A mild Indian curry recipe found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise”
(A Culinary Voyage) published by Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987
Roganjhost – Mild Lamb Curry / Mild Lammekarri

Roganjhost are among the dishes you will find on the menu all over India. These tender lamb cubes in a creamy, aromatic sauce, lightly spiced and with just a hint of chili, is a good example that curries need not be burning hot to be delicious.

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Port Wine Cured Lamb Fillet / Portvinsgravet Lammefilet

A traditional recipe from Northern Norway found on Aperitif.no
Port Wine Cured Lamb Fillet / Portvinsgravet Lammefilet

History: This recipe is originally from the Northern part of Norway and is found in many a grandmother’s handwritten cookbook. The recipe can be traced to the early nineteenth century, but it is not unlikely that it is even older.

The traditional accompaniments were flat bread and sour cream, and the fillet was placed in the basement for maturing as there were not many fridges to find in those days. Lofoten was famously for its close relations with the continent in connection with exports of stockfish and dried fish, and therefore had access to some nobler ingredients, such as port wine.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 5

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Lamb Ribs With Mashed Root Vegetables /Pinnekjøtt Med Rotmos
Lamb Ribs With Mashed Root Vegetables /
Pinnekjøtt Med Rotmos

Mustard Herring / Sennepsild
Mustard Herring / Sennepsild

Lamb Casserole with Root Vegetables / Lammegryte med Røtter

A autumn dinner recipe found in “Cappelens Kokebok”
(Cappelen’s Cook Book) published in 1991
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This is a traditional Norwegian autumn dish. Together with “Mutton in Cabbage” it was served after the lambs were slaughtered in the autumn.

Around this time of the year the grocers here in Norway fill up with lambs meat particularly suite for these two dishes so, yes, the tradition is fortunately still alive – Ted

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Marinated Lamb Chops with Green Butter / Marinerte Lammekoteletter med Grønt Smør

A delicious dinner recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980
marinated lamb chops with green butter_post

Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

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Medieval Monday – Lamb or Mutton Stew / Lam eller Fårekjøttstuing

A recipe from the Elizabethian Era found on CookIt
Medieval Monday_headinglamb or mutton stew_post

Meat stews formed part of the diet of many households. This rich, meaty version reflects an upper class dish, both due to the quantity of meat and the inclusion of mace. Note the French title, reflecting the Norman influence over England. Poorer households would not use any imported spices and would bulk out a small amount of meat with plenty of vegetables and grains.

Some people suggest the dish’s original name ‘Hericot de Mouton’ comes from the word halicoter, to cut up. On the other hand, some versions of this dish use a type of turnips called haricot. Lamb will not need parboiling but mutton would require parboiling to tenderise the meat.

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Lamb Curry / Lam i Karri

An Anglo-Indian recipe found in “Berømte Retter” (Famous Dishes) published by Ernst G Mortensens Forlag in 1970 Lamb Curry post_ill

traditional badge ethnic speciality_flatCurry powder consists of a mixture of at least 7-8 different kinds of spices and plants. It originates from India, where housewives still mixes their own curry adapted to their family’s taste. Curry from the Madras area is considered to be much sharper (hotter) in flavor than the one from North India. traditional badge british_flatDuring their Indian colonial times the British learned to appreciate curry, and when the officers and soldiers came back to England, they had developed a taste for these spicy dishes and brought them thus into the English kitchen.

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Medieval Monday – Al-Sikbaj

Medieval Monday_heading
A Medieval Arabic recipe found on TheFoodBlogAl-Sikbaj_post

Fouad Kassab who runs The Food Blog writes: When I first cooked this dish, I was overwhelmed with excitement. I felt like a scientist or an archaeologist rediscovering a long forgotten world. And truly, when I tasted the end result, this dish blew me away, exceeding all expectations. The flavours of saffron, dried fruit, almonds and rose water really give you a sense of medieval Arabia. I hope this recipe reaches the thousands of Middle-Eastern chefs out there, and I would love to see al-sikbaj make the remarkable resurrection that it so deserves. So here it goes, my recipe for al-sikbaj, put together after many hours of reading through medieval cook books and attempting to reach the right balance of ingredients.

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Greek Meatballs / Greske Kjøttboller

A classic Greek recipe found in “Lammekjøtt” (Lamb)
published by Hjemmets kokebokklubb in 1981

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Koussa Mehché – Stuffed Courgettes / Fylte Courgetter

A recipe from the Middle East found in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970.

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In context

The courgette is a variety of cucurtbit, which means it’s from the same family as cucumber, squash and melon. It is the most popular Courgettes-2_crvegetable of the squash family, being extremely versatile, tender and easy to cook. Just don’t boil them! They have a deep green skin with firm pale flesh and are also known as zucchini.

Availability Courgettes are at their best from June until September. Choose the best Choose small courgettes that are firm to touch with a glossy, unblemished skin. Avoid soft, squishy courgettes.

Prepare it Courgettes do not need peeling. Slice off each end and prepare as recipe directs. It’s best not to boil, as they will become mushy and lose their flavour. Instead lightly sauté in butter or oil and a small amount of water.

Store it Refrigerate in a vegetable storage bag in the crisper compartment and eat within 2-3 days.

Cook it Try courgettes sliced thinly and eaten raw, cooked on a griddle, in a stir fry, or fried in a light batter as chips.

Alternatives Try squash or marrow.

Crispy Lamb Chunks With Dips / Sprø Lammebiter Med Dip

Tasty comfort food recipes found on magasin.info
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This dish is perfect as comfort food, a welcome-chew or as part of tapas table. Mutton from thigh fits perfectly, since this meat is primarily tender and therefore do not need long heat treatment. These are really tasty goodies!

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Australian Lamb Casserole / Australsk Lammegryte

A dinner recipe from a recipe card publshed by
Paul Hamlyn Ltd. in 1967
Australian Lamb Casserole_post

As this is a recipe card printed in Canada and the dish was Australian it was nice to see the dish served in a serving dish made by Figgjo Flint here in Norway. The dinnerware came in this blue design and a reddish/green one that I’ve got myself.

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