Baked Potato Variations / Bakt Potet Variasjoner

An appatizer/lunch recipe found in “Cappelens Kokebok”
published in  1995

Baked Potato Variations / Bakt Potet Variasjoner

Baking is a great way to cook potatoes. They can be eaten as regular boiled potatoes, but can also be served as an appetizer or main course together with suitable accessories. You should choose quite large potatoes, but it is also possible to bake smaller ones. Mealy varieties are best suited. Note that it is not a good idea to wrap the potatoes in aluminum foil. They get a much better taste and texture without.

000_england_recipe_marker_nyPotato Pete000_norway_recipe_marker_nyThe little guy there is Potato Pete and he was part of a campaign
introduced during WWII to encourage the British population to eat
home-grown vegetables.

Winking smile

Baked Stuffed Tomatoes / Bakte Fylte Tomater

A lunch recipe found in “60 ways to Serve Star Ham”
published by  Armour Co in 1930

Baked Stuffed Tomatoes / Bakte Fylte Tomater

Text from the booklet: The only real rival of “Star” Ham is Armour’s “Star” Bacon. In uniform quality it is equally dependable for it has the same famous Fixed* Flavor. The mildness and sweetness of this choicest bacon are distinctive, As a breakfast delicacy, it is admittedly unsurpassed. Wherever finest foods are served – on dining cars, in prominent hotels and elsewhere – it is a familiar item on the menus.

000_england_recipe_marker_nystar000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Grilled Salmon with Horseradish Sauce / Grillet Laks med Pepperrotsaus

A lunch/dinner recipe found in “Sundt og Godt”
(Healthy and Delicious) published by Det Beste in 1988
Grilled Salmon with Horseradish Sauce / Grillet Laks med Pepperrotsaus

Your tears may start to flow when you grate the horseradish,
but the taste is impeccable with grilled salmon.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge barbecue000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Cheese Pie With Bacon / Ostepai Med Bacon

A pie recipe found in “Best Casseroles to Make”
published by Woman’s Day in 1973

Cheese Pie With Bacon / Ostepai Med Bacon

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_007000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Mushroom Omelet / Soppomelett

A delicious lunch recipe found in “Lær Mer om Sopp”
(Learn More About Mushrooms) utgitt av BAMA gruppen i 1982

Mushroom Omelet / Soppomelett

Omelets is the perfect snack no matter what time of day it is. If you got a pack of eggs in your fridge you can make one in a matter of minutes. You can make a plain omelet or fill it with just about anything. It must be among the most versatile dishes in the world – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

A suffle recipe found in “10 Inspirerende Oppskrifter
med Jarlsberg” (10 Inspiring Recipes with Jarlsberg)
published by
 Tine
Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

Jarlsberg (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈjɑːɭsˈbærɡ]; English /ˈjɑːrlzbɜːrɡ/) is a mild cow’s-milk cheese with large regular holes, that originates from Jarlsberg, Norway. Although it originated in Norway, it is also produced in Ohio and Ireland under licenses from Norwegian dairy producers.

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Mushrooms in Tart Shells / Sopp i Terteskjell

A lunch recipe found in “Alt om Urter” (All About Herbs) published by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1885sopp i terteskjell_post_thumb[2]_thumb

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

A Ladies’ Luncheon Served by the Hostess anno 1910

illustration_01This article was printed in “The Hostess” published by the Bromangelon Publishing Department in 1910, and it is making it quite clear that when inviting a few lady friends over for luncheon back then putting a box of Twinings Earl Grey tea bags and a tray of hastily made sandwiches on the table simply wouldn’t do

Ted
Winking smile


Every hostess, however modest her home surroundings, cherishes the ambition to shine in her own little sphere. The ideas suggested in this little book are intended as a guide to simple methods of entertaining in a hospitable, easy, refined and dignified manner, without any undue extravagance. They are intended to serve, not as set patterns to be copied or followed in every detail, but rather to suggest to the ingenious hostess, ways of adapting her own original ideas to the art of graceful home entertainment.

illustration_02

Most hostesses do not realize the full value and usefulness of the serving table. To serve a meal without a maid  is easy of accomplishment, if one will follow the hints conveyed in this description.

Instead of the more conventional large tablecloth, for this cosy occasion we will use the more decorative embroidered centerpiece and doilies.

A Ladies’ Luncheon Served by the Hostess anno 1910

Place on the embroidered centerpiece an earthen jar or vase filled with honeysuckle or some graceful flowering vine. At each cover place a low, small glass with a long branch of the same vine; a water glass partly filled with cracked ice, a small butter plate, containing a butter ball, the little knife by its side; a doily, on which is the service-plate; to the right, two silver knives (sharp edge toward the plate)—to the left, three forks (the prongs turned up), and the napkin, folded square (monogram side up). On the table are three trays, one containing narrow strips of twice-baked bread; and the two smaller ones holding chocolate or other bonbons, and olives or salted almonds.

Most of this luncheon is prepared in advance, and ten minutes before serving, the hostess excuses herself to her guests to heat the first course and prepare the coffee. Everything else is in readiness.

The Menu

Lobster Newburg on Toast
Finger Slices of Dry Toast
Cold Turkey or Chicken
Hearts of Celery
Twice Baked Bread
Jellied Pecan Salad
Brown Bread Sandwiches
Chocolate Cakes filled with Whipped Cream
Black Coffee
Cheese Straws
Salted Nuts, (or Olives)
Sweets

As the guests enter the dining-room, the first course, Lobster Newburg (or Crab Creole) has already been placed. This has been prepared in advance, and only required quick heating on gas burner or chafing-dish before serving. The serving table with a five o’clock tea cloth of handsome linen stands against the wall to the left of the hostess. This table is of the same height as the luncheon table, and is equipped with a lower shelf of the same size as the table top. On top are placed the water pitcher, ice bowl, after-dinner coffee cups and saucers, the plates, a handsome coffee pot and two covered  trays, one holding cheese straws, the other the  cakes.

A Ladies’ Luncheon Served by the Hostess anno 1910

On the lower shelf, out of sight, are the second and third courses (which are both cold) arranged on plates—the salad plates toward the back, the plates of cold chicken or turkey (dressed with celery hearts and twice-baked bread) towards the front. The four finger bowls, the napkins and extra silver are in a corner at the back.

Each guest, as she receives the plate for the second course, passes her used plate and silver from the first course to the hostess. These used plates are slipped by the hostess into the places just vacated on the lower shelf of the serving table. When the salad comes forward, places are made for the plates from the second course. Thus, as soon as a plate has been used, it vanishes as completely as with the best trained service. After all the plates and silver have been used, they can be placed in piles on the lower shelf, and removed after the departure of the guests.

When dessert and coffee have been served, the guests will retire with the hostess to the drawing room.

If these instructions are observed everything will pass off very smoothly.

Medieval Monday – Hanoney

A historic egg dish recipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
Hanoney_page_thumb2_thumb

Take eggs, and draw the yolks and white through a strainer, And take onions, And Shred them small. And take fair butter or grease, and scarcely cover over the pan therewith. And fry the onions together, then let them fry together a little while. And take them up, And serve them forth so, all broken in a dish.

From Harleian MS. 4016, I Volume

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Pop-Overs

A baking recipe found in”Borden’s Evaporated Milk Book
of Recipes” published in the 1920s

Pop-Overs

A popover is a light, hollow roll made from an egg batter similar to that of Yorkshire pudding, typically baked in muffin tins or dedicated popover pans, which have straight-walled sides rather than angled.

Popovers may be served either as a sweet – topped with fruit and whipped cream or butter and jam for breakfast or with afternoon tea – or with meats at lunch and dinner.

000_england_recipe_marker_nyillus000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

If you want to download
Borden’s Evaporated Milk Book of Recipes
click the icon below

pdf symbol

Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

A fish recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon” published by Alaska Packers Association in 1900Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

Chafing-Dish_thumb2A chafing dish (from the French chauffer, “to make warm”) is a kind of portable grate raised on a tripod, originally heated with charcoal in a brazier, and used for foods that require gentle cooking, away from the “fierce” heat of direct flames. The chafing dish could be used at the table or provided with a cover for keeping food warm on a buffet. Double dishes that provide a protective water jacket are known as bains-marie and help keep delicate foods, such as fish, warm while preventing overcooking.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge seafood000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Chili Omelet / Chili Omelett

A spicy omelet recipe found in
“The Quick & Easy Armour Cookbook” published by
Benjamin Company/Rutledge Book in 1980

Chili Omelet / Chili Omelett

Why not give you day a real kickstart with a spicy omelet for breakfast. Nothing gets the system up and running like chilli with the morning tea – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge breakfast_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Chinese Chicken Salad / Kinesisk Kyllingsalat

A healthy lunch recipe found in “Rethink School Lunch –
Cooking With California Food” an E-book published
by Center for Ecoliteracy

Chinese Chicken Salad / Kinesisk Kyllingsalat

Snow peas, which add a sweet crunch to this recipe, were an early spring crop in ancient China, harvested when snow was still on the ground, hence their name. Napa cabbage has a sweet, mild taste and can be used raw in salads, as it is here. Toasting the walnuts first will bring out their flavor.

If you would like to download
‘Rethink School Lunch – Cooking With California Food
click the title above

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge asian_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Ham Hash with Poached Eggs / Hakket Skinke med Porsjerte Egg

A lunch recipe found in “60 Ways to Serve Ham” published
by Armour & Company in 1930
Ham Hash with Poached Eggs / Hakket Skinke med Porsjerte Egg

Armour & Company published a series of these cookbooks promoting their hams and bacon  in the 1920s and 1930s, all with very artistic illustrations like this one. If you like to download this cook book in pdf format, click the title below.

‘60 Ways to Serve Ham’

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill_001000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Campfire Spinach Dip / Spinatdip til Bålkosen

A great dip recipe found on diyprojects.com
Campfire Spinach Dip_post

Camping does not have to be all hot dogs and hamburgers.  One should  include a few family favorites when one head out into the great outdoors.  This Campfire Spinach Dip is sure to become one of yours!

It’s a nice break from the traditional camping fare.  Served with a sliced baguette it makes the perfect breakfast or light lunch.  Creating a tin foil packet to encase the dip in makes cooking and clean up a breeze!

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge campfire000_norway_recipe_marker_ny