Norwegian Oatmeal Porridge with Fruit and Berries / Havregrøt med Frukt og Bær

A modern take on the classic Norwegian
oatmeal porridge found on
frukt.no
Norwegian Oatmeal Porridge with Fruit and Berries / Havregrøt med Frukt og Bær

Make a delicious oatmeal porridge for breakfast and add fruit
and berries to taste. You will not find a healthier or
better way to start the day.

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Norwegian Traditional Velvet Porridge / Fløyelsgrøt

A recipefor a traditional Norwegian Saturday porridge
found on
norsktradisjonsmat.no

Norwegian Traditional Velvet Porridge / Fløyelsgrøt

Delicious porridge with long traditions. This recipe is taken from  “Traditionskost fra Ringerike” (Traditional Food from Ringerike), published in 1996.

Here we can read that porridge and gruel were widely used in theold days. Water porridge and milk porridge were most common everyday, while velvet porridge was usually served on Saturday afternoon. An old farmhand from Ådalen once said, “If theres no porridge, I might as well stay here.” He was out working out in the fields and saw no reason to walk up to the farmhouse to eat the evening meal if there was no porridge on the table.

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Real Norwegian Egg Cream / Ekte Eggekrem

A traditional Norwegian dessert sauce recipe from matprat.no
Real Norwegian Egg Cream / Ekte Eggekrem

Real egg cream is velvety and extra rich and delicious.
The cream is excellent with fresh fruit and/or berries.

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Soft Lefse from Løvøy / Mørlefse fra Løvøy

A lefse recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Soft Lefse from Løvøy / Mørlefse fra Løvøy

There are certainly more than a hundred different recipes for lefse
around in Norway. This one from Løvøy  is one of them – Ted

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Barley Cream with Blackcurrant Sauce / Byggrynkrem med Solbærsaus

A Christmas dessert recipe found at New Scandinavian Cooking
Barley-Cream-with-Blackcurrant-Sauce[1]

Andreas Viestad writes about the recipe:
  This is a very traditional Norwegian Christmas dessert.

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Minced Oysters / Hakkede Østers

A starter recipe found in “The New Sealtest Book of Recipes
and Menus” published by  Sealtest Inc in 1940

Minced Oysters / Hakkede Østers

If you’re not all that fond of oysters I’m sure this recipe will work
just as well with mussles or scallops – Ted

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Sour Milk Soup / Surmjølkssuppe

A traditional Norwegian dessert soup from bygdekvinnelaget.no
Sour Milk Soup / Surmjølkssuppe

Soup made with sour milk top with whipped cream, raisins and
chopped almonds. Recipe from Øvre Folldal bygdekvinnelag.

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Swedish Egg Cake / Svensk Eggekake

A traditional Swedish lunch/dinner recipe found in
“Carl Butler’s Cook Book” published i Norwegian
by Cappelen i 1974

Swedish Egg Cake / Svensk Eggekake

Nordic cookbook history was written in 1974. That year a bunch of foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, “Carl Butler’s Cookbook”. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of herbal spices and garlic it can be found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and paté on our tables.

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Coconut Butterscotch Pie / Kokos- og Smørkaramellpai

A pie recipe from “Cocnut – Sun-Sweetness From The Tropics”
published by Franklin Baker Company in 1928

Coconut Butterscotch Pie / Kokos- og Smørkaramellpai

Butterscotch is a type of confectionery whose primary ingredients are brown sugar and butter, although other ingredients are part of some recipes, such as corn syrup, cream, vanilla, and salt. The earliest known recipes in the middle 19th century used treacle (molasses) in place of or in addition to sugar.

Butterscotch is similar to toffee, but for butterscotch the sugar is boiled to the soft crack stage, and not hard crack as with toffee. Butterscotch sauce, made of butterscotch and cream, is used as a topping for ice cream (particularly sundaes).

The term butterscotch is also often used more specifically of the flavour of brown sugar and butter together, even where the actual confection butterscotch is not involved, such as in butterscotch pudding.

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Chocolate Masquerade Pudding / Sjokolade Maskeradepudding

A dessert recipe found in “Baker’s Favourite Chocolate Recipes”
published in 1936

Chocolate Masquerade Pudding / Sjokolade Maskeradepudding

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Chalet Orange Soufflé / Chalet Appelsinsufflé

A recipe from “Famous Florida Chefs’ Favorite Citrus Recipes”
published by Florida Citrus commission in 1970

Chalet Orange Soufflé / Chalet Appelsinsufflé

A soufflé (French: [su.fle]) is a baked egg-based dish which originated in early eighteenth century France. It is made with egg yolks and beaten egg whites combined with various other ingredients and served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to breathe” or “to puff”

The earliest mention of the soufflé is attributed to French master cook Vincent de la Chapelle, circa the early eighteenth century. The development and popularization of the soufflé is usually traced to French chef Marie-Antoine Carême in the early nineteenth century

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Boxty – Traditional Irish Potato Cakes / Tradisjonelle Irske Potetkaker

A traditional Irish recipe found on irishcentral.com
Boxty – Traditional Irish Potato Cakes / Tradisjonelle Irske Potetkaker

Traditional Irish potato cakes, or boxty, are mostly associated with the north midlands of Ireland in Connacht and Ulster. The people of Mayo, Sligo, Donegal, Fermanagh, Longford, Leitrim and Cavan are particularly big fans of this delicious and simple style of potatoes.

It is thought that boxty dates back to the days or the Irish famine, presumably to make the potatoes stretch further. There are a couple of different recipes, but all contain finely grated, raw potatoes served fried.

Over the last couple of years, as the Irish have become more interested in their own cuisine, the popularity of boxty has risen. It’s now quite normal to see boxty on a menu in a restaurant in Ireland, whereas a decade ago it would have still been considered a ‘peasant dish.’ However, boxty has always been popular as part of Irish home cooking as one traditional (if woefully out-dated) rhyme explains:

Boxty on the griddle,
Boxty in the pan,
If you can’t make boxty,
You’ll never get your man.

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Frikadelles with Tomato Sauce / Frikadeller med Tomatsaus

A dinner recipe from a special issue of “Husmorens Kokebok” (The Housewife’s Cook Book) published in 1963
Frikadelles with Tomato Sauce / Frikadeller med Tomatsaus

This dish is typical of the dinners here in Norway in the early sixties.
Even the dinnerware and tablecloth are typical for the sixties – Ted

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Macaroni and Cheese / Makaroni og Ost

One of Elvis Presley’s favourite dishes found in
“Are you hungry tonight” published in 1992
Macaroni and Cheese / Makaroni og Ost

Elvis ate macaroni and cheese at home whenever possible. He
loved it homemade, thick, gooey, and made with American cheese.

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Braided Egg Bread / Flettebrød med Egg

A recipe for great looking egg bread found on crisco.com
Braided Egg Bread / Flettebrød med Egg

You don’t often see braided bread like this in Scandinavia, cakes on the other hand is far from rare. These braids  are usually glazed with a simple confectioners’ sugar glazing.

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