Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

An eighteen centure sickbed recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Modern custard recipes usually call for vanilla, but that wasn’t used in America in colonial times. Thomas Jefferson first brought vanilla beans back from France in the 1890s, and as Richard Sax noted in Classic Home Desserts, vanilla extract wasn’t widely available until the mid-19th century. Eighteenth-century custards were flavored with wine or brandy, tea, or spices. I added nutmeg to Simmons’s recipe since it seemed so bland — but I guess that was sort of the point.

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Chocolate-Amaretto Ice Cream / Sjokolade og Amaretto Iskrem

A great dessert recipe found in “Hershey’s Make it Chocolate!” published by Hershey in 1987Chocolate-Amaretto Ice Cream / Sjokolade og Amaretto Iskrem

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Amaretto (Italian for “a little bitter”) is a sweet, almond-flavoured, Italian liqueur associated with Saronno, Italy. Various commercial brands are made from a base of apricot pits, almonds, or both.

Amaretto serves a variety of culinary uses, can be drunk by itself, and is added to other beverages to create several popular mixed drinks, as well as to coffee and ice cream.

Citrus Flavor Creme Catalane / Creme Catalane med Smak av Sitrus

A contemporary take on a traditional Spanish
dessert recipe found on meny.no

Citrus Flavor Creme Catalane / Creme Catalane med Smak av Sitrus

Crema catalana is a traditional Spanish dessert made from milk, egg yolks and sugar. It is considered by some to be the forerunner of crème brûlée. The crema catalana on the pictures is sevred with a citrus salad.

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Medieval Monday – Arbolettys

A medieval spicy egg dish recipefound on
One Year and Thousand Eggs Medieval Monday_headingMedieval Monday – Arbolettys

Saara who runs One Year and Thousand Eggs writes: This egg dish is kind of scrambled eggs with herbs. It is very good with toasted bread.

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Chocolate Pots de Creme / Sjokolade Pots de Creme

A classic French dessert recipe found on epicurus.com
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Simply extraordinary, Chocolate Pots de Crême may be served in a variety of containers. As individual portions, they’re perfect for entertaining and easy for family sweets. These go perfectly with a nice after dinner liqueur.

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Walnut Milk / Valnøttmelk

A recipe for a dairy free milk found on bhg.com
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Silky nut milks are a great alternative to traditional dairy milks
and are surprisingly simple to make.
For a smoother milk, strain with a cheesecloth.

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19th Century Excellent Potato Pudding / 1800talls Utmerket Potetpudding

A classic 19th century save-all recipe found on Tunspit & Table
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Kim who runs ‘Tunspit & Table‘ writes: These recipes are both sweet and savoury, sometimes baked in a pie case and sometimes without, and they lasted from at least the mid-18th century to the end of the 19th. It’s not hard to understand why these puddings would have been popular, they are basically all cheap starch, flavoured with relatively small amounts of more expensive ingredients – brandy, citrus fruits, currants, sugar, or a little spice. They are also quite an appetising way of using up left over boiled potatoes, The Family Save-All specifically recommends saving up the potatoes left from two or three days meals. I also quite like that it is recommended for children, “children of larger growth”, invalids and the elderly, i.e. everyone.

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Medieval Monday – 15th Century Roasted Milk / 1400talls Stekt Melk

A mysterious 15th Century recipe found on Tunspit & Table
headingMedieval Monday - 15th Century Roasted Milk / 1400talls Stekt Melk

Kim who runs ‘Tunspit & Table‘ writes: Yes, you read that right, it says Roasted Milk. You may be wondering, as did I, exactly how one roasts milk. Well, it turns out it’s not really roasted at all, but you make a kind of set custard, slice it up and fry it. The trick of course was to get the right proportion of milk to eggs to make custard when there are no amounts given in the original recipe.

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Duchess Potatoes / Duchessepoteter

A great way to serve potatoes found on frukt.no
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Duchess Potatoes are mashed potatoes with added egg yolks, shaped with piping bag or knife and then roasted in the oven. A decorative new twist to your dinner.

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Health Advice From the Past – Part 1 – Ice Cream

What greater tribute could be given
a health food!

icecream_ill        Ice cream heads the list of wholesome, nutritious, appetizing foods in hospitals and health sanitariums. Doctors and dietitians know that it is a health food full of nutriment. Nutrition experts recognize it as an accepted way of giving children more pure rich milk and cream. What greater tribute could be given a health food!

        The ice cream that you buy today is a pure dairy product made of rich milk and cream and the same wholesome ingredients you would use at home. Made in modern plants under official health regulations, its purity is assured.

        Give ice cream to your children often. When you buy it, look for this emblem of purity and wholesome-ness.

Copyright 1926: Research Council,
Ice Cream Industry,
Harrisburg. Pa

From an add published in
“The Ladies’ Home Journal”
January 1927

Millet porridge / Hirsegrøt

A classic breakfast porridge recipe found on tine.no
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Millet porridge is a flavorful porridge suitable for both breakfast and and an evening meal. The porridge can be cooked with whole grain or millet flakes.

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Depression-era Blueberry Pudding / Blåbærpuddung fra De Harde Tredveåra

A dessert recipe from harder times found in
Bite From The Past
Depression-era Blueberry Pudding_post

The girl who runs Bite From The past writes: A librarian friend of mine recently came across a cookbook in our collection that she felt I had Depression-era Blueberry Pudding_ill_thumb[22]_thumbto know about! It is “The World’s Modern Cook Book and Kitchen Guide for the Busy Woman” by Mabel Claire, published in 1932. It’s got beautiful typeset that makes you want to bob your hair, grab your heels and gloves, and hop a train into the city.

But a close look through the recipes reveals less than glamorous times for American housewives, who struggled to stretch food dollars in the midst of one of the greatest economic calamities of our country’s history. The book is full of recipes for casseroles, potluck desserts, and dishes made with cheap commodities like eggs, oats, and noodles. I wonder if the women who cooked from it thought, as I do, that it does a good job of making frugal cooking look fancy.

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Crema Catalana with Raspberries / Crema Catalana med Bringebær

A classic dessert recipe found in a promotion booklet
published by
rema1000
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Crema catalana is a traditional Spanish dessert made from milk, egg yolks and sugar. It is considered by some to be the forerunner of the crème brûlée. It is from Catalonia, Spain, where it is a specialty.

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How to Make Homemade Goat Cheese with Lemon Juice / Slik Lager Du Hjemmelaget Geitost med Sitronsaft

A recipe for homemade cheese found on about.com/food/How to Make Homemade Goat Cheese with Lemon Juice_cheese.about_post

If you want to make a very simple version of homemade goat cheese, this recipe using lemon juice and goat’s milk is the one. The acidity in the lemon juice thickens the milk and makes soft curds form. Once the liquid is drained away from the curds, viola, you have a basic but tasty version of homemade goat cheese.

White vinegar can also be used to make homemade goat cheese, although the lemon flavor is slightly more pleasing in the finished product.

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The History of Yogurt

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Analysis of the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus genome indicates that the bacterium may have originated on the surface of a plant. Milk may have become spontaneously and unintentionally exposed to it through contact with plants, or bacteria may have been transferred from the udder of domestic milk-producing animals.

The origins of yogurt are unknown, but it is thought to have been invented in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC.

In ancient Indian records, the combination of yogurt and honey is called “the food of the gods”. Persian traditions hold that “Abraham owed his fecundity and longevity to the regular ingestion of yogurt”.

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The cuisine of ancient Greece included a dairy product known as oxygala (οξύγαλα) which is believed to have been a form of yogurt. Galen (AD 129 – c. 200/c. 216) mentioned that oxygala was consumed with honey, similar to the way thickened Greek yogurt is eaten today.

The oldest writings mentioning yogurt are attributed to Pliny the Elder, who remarked that certain “barbarous nations” knew how “to thicken the milk into a substance with an agreeable acidity”. The use of yogurt by medieval Turks is recorded in the books Diwan Lughat al-Turk by Mahmud Kashgari and Kutadgu Bilig by Yusuf Has Hajib written in the 11th century. Both texts mention the word “yogurt” in different sections and describe its use by nomadic Turks. The earliest yogurts were probably spontaneously fermented by wild bacteria in goat skin bags.

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Some accounts suggest that Indian emperor Akbar’s cooks would flavor yogurt with mustard seeds and cinnamon. Another early account of a European encounter with yogurt occurs in French clinical history: yogurt_11Francis I suffered from a severe diarrhea which no French doctor could cure. His ally Suleiman the Magnificent sent a doctor, who allegedly cured the patient with yogurt. Being grateful, the French king spread around the information about the food which had cured him.

Until the 1900s, yogurt was a staple in diets of people in the Russian Empire (and especially Central Asia and the Caucasus), Western Asia, South Eastern Europe/Balkans, Central Europe, and India. Stamen Grigorov (1878–1945), a Bulgarian student of medicine in Geneva, first examined the microflora of the Bulgarian yogurt. In 1905, he described it as consisting of a spherical and a rod-like lactic acid-producing bacteria. In 1907, the rod-like bacterium was called Bacillus bulgaricus (now Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus).

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The Russian Nobel laureate and biologist Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov (also known as Élie Metchnikoff), from the Institut Pasteur in Paris, was influenced by Grigorov’s work and hypothesized that regular consumption of yogurt was responsible for the unusually long lifespans of Bulgarian peasants. Believing Lactobacillus to be essential for good health, Mechnikov worked to popularize yogurt as a foodstuff throughout Europe.

Isaac Carasso industrialized the production of yogurt. In 1919, Carasso, who was from Ottoman Salonika, started a small yogurt business in Barcelona, Spain, and named the business Danone (“little Daniel”) after his son. The brand later expanded to the United States under an Americanized version of the name: Dannon.

Yogurt with added fruit jam was patented in 1933 by the Radlická Mlékárna dairy in Prague.

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Yogurt was introduced to the United States in the first decade of the twentieth century, influenced by Élie Metchnikoff’s The Prolongation of Life; Optimistic Studies (1908); it was available in tablet form for those with digestive intolerance and yogurt_12for home culturing. It was popularized by John Harvey Kellogg at the Battle Creek Sanitarium, where it was used both orally and in enemas, and later by Armenian immigrants Sarkis and Rose Colombosian, who started “Colombo and Sons Creamery” in Andover, Massachusetts in 1929.

Colombo Yogurt was originally delivered around New England in a horse-drawn wagon inscribed with the Armenian word “madzoon” which was later changed to “yogurt”, the Turkish name of the product, as Turkish was the lingua franca between immigrants of the various Near Eastern ethnicities who were the main consumers at that time. Yogurt’s popularity in the United States was enhanced in the 1950s and 1960s, when it was presented as a health food. By the late 20th century, yogurt had become a common American food item and Colombo Yogurt was sold in 1993 to General Mills, which discontinued the brand in 2010.

Text from Wikipedia