Steak and Eggs with Beer and Molasses / Biff og Egg med Pils og Mørk Sirup

A classic Irish breakfast recipe found on irishcentral.com
Steak and Eggs with Beer and Molasses / Biff og Egg med Pils og Mørk Sirup

Steak and eggs is a dish prepared with beefsteak and eggs as primary ingredients. It is most typically served as a breakfast or brunch food, although it can also be consumed at any mealtime, such as for dinner in the evening.

Ingredients

Various types of beefsteaks can be used, such as rib eye, strip, sirloin and flank, among others. Additional ingredients may include bell pepper, garlic, onion, butter, salt, pepper, seasonings and others. Accompaniments may include various sauces, such as steak sauce, Worcestershire sauce, chimichurri. and others.

Variations

Variations include steak and egg sandwiches, open sandwiches and steak and Eggs Benedict.  A version of steak and egg salad utilizes greens such as arugula, poached eggs and steak.  Vegetarian versions also exist, in which vegetables, such as cauliflower, squash and potatoes, are sliced into thick steaks and served with eggs.

In popular culture

Steak and eggs is the traditional NASA astronaut’s breakfast, first served to Alan Shepard before his flight on May 5, 1961.

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Molasses Walnut Cookies / Småkaker med Mørk Sirup og Valnøtter

A cookie recipe found in “Cooky Jar Favorites”
published by The Tested Recipe Institute in 1960

Molasses Walnut Cookies / Småkaker med Mørk Sirup og Valnøtter

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Almond Health Bread / Helsebrød med Mandler

A recipe found in “Almond Recipes for the well balanced menu” published by Blue Diamond Almonds Brand in 1916
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This bread may not be considered as very healty in our day and age with all that sugar and molasses, but it does at least sound very tasty

Ted
Winking smile

If you want to download this book in pdf format
you can do that
HERE

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Coffee And Molasses Dream Bars / Drømmekaker med Kaffe og Mørk Sirup

A flashback from the thirties found at lostrecipesfound.com
Coffee And Molasses Dream Bars / Drømmekaker med Kaffe og Mørk Sirup

These bars are richly flavored with molasses, strong coffee and a generous portion of ground cloves. They’re adapted from a recipe originally published 33 years ago in a community cookbook from Ladies Aid at Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church in South Milwaukee. Slather the coffee icing on while the bars are still warm.

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Homemade Black Licorice / Hjemmelaget Svart Lakris

A classic sweets recipe  found on food52.com
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I got a feeling that licorice is something you either love or hate. As a kid I loved the soft sweet ones, now I’m more partial to the harder salty ones, but wouldn’t say no to some sweet ones even now. You’ve guessed it, I know, I love licorice – Ted  😉

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Smith College Fudge / Fudge fra Smith College

A recipe from “Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes by Miss Paloa”
published  Baker’s & Co in 1909

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An American-style fudge (containing chocolate) was found in a letter written by Emelyn Battersby Hartridge, a student at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. She wrote that her schoolmate’s cousin made fudge in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1889 and sold it for 40 cents a pound. Hartridge obtained the fudge recipe and, in 1890, made 30 lb (14 kg) of fudge for the Vassar College Senior Auction.This Vassar fudge recipe became quite popular at the school for years to come.

Word of this popular confectionery spread to other women’s colleges. For example, Wellesley College and Smith College have their own versions of a fudge recipe dating from the late 19th or early 20th century.

Fudge-making evolved a variety of flavors and additives as it grew beyond its popularity at colleges.

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The History of Condiments

condiments_01Since ancient times people have used condiments to enhance their food. The first condiment was salt. Salt has always been used both as a preservative and to enhance the flavor of food. Vinegar has also been used since ancient times. Its name is probably derived from the French words vin aiger meaning sour wine. (Vinegar was used as a medicine as well as a food).

The Romans liked condiments and they made many sauces for their food. One of the most common was a fish sauce called liquamen. The Romans also grew mustard and they introduced it into the parts of Europe they conquered. They also made mint sauce.

condiments_02In the Middle Ages mustard was a popular condiment in Europe. At first English mustard consisted of coarse powder and it was not very strong. However in 1720 a Mrs Clements of Durham began making a much smoother mustard powder. When mixed with water to make paste it was very hot but it proved to be popular and Durham became a center of the mustard industry. (For centuries mustard was used as a medicine as well as a food).

In the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries new condiments were invented. Pesto sauce was invented in 16th century Italy. Furthermore new sauces were invented in the 17th century including bechamel and chasseur. Chutney comes from India. It was first exported to England in the 17th century. Soy sauce, which was invented in China reached Europe in the 17th century and by the mid-18th century it was popular in Britain.

condiments_03According to one story a French chef first made mayonnaise in 1756. However there are many stories about where it comes from. Hollandaise sauce was also first recorded in the mid-18th century. Ketchup began life as a Chinese fish sauce called ke-tsiap. The name was gradually changed to ketchup and in Britain people added other ingredients instead of fish. In the 18th century they began adding tomatoes. Sauces similar to tartar sauce were made in the Middle Ages but ‘modern’ tartar sauce was first made in the 1800s

condiments_04In the 19th century with the Industrial Revolution condiments began to be mass-produced in factories. Tomato ketchup was a best seller and HP sauce was invented at the end of the 19th century. Meanwhile Worcester sauce was invented in Worcester in 1835 by John Lea and William Perrins. Horseradish sauce went on sale in bottles in the USA around 1860. Salad cream was invented in 1914.

As well as sauces people have also looked for ways to sweeten their food. Since the time of the Ancient Egyptians and probably before people have kept bees for honey. Over condiments_05the centuries honey was very valuable and it was sometimes used as a currency or it was given as a tribute to a conqueror. Since ancient times people have also made an alcoholic drink called mead from honey.

Sugar cane first grew in South Asia. Later the Arabs and Europeans grew sugar cane. At the end of the 15th century sugar cane was taken to the New World. Sugar was first made from sugar beet in the 18th century. A German chemist called Andreas Marggraf was the first person to make sugar from beet in 1747. Saccharine was invented in 1879 by Constantine Fahlberg.

Text from localhistories.org

WWII Lunch – Ginger Bread / Krigsindustrilunsj – Krydderkake

A WWII recipe from an ad for Kitchen Craft flour
published in 1942
 
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From the ad text

Bake him a gingerbread

Little touches like home-baked bread and cake, a thermos filled with old-fashioned soup, or a small jar of his favourite salad, make a box lunch much more like a meal at home.

The fact is, every hard-working man in our war industry deserves and needs heartier, tastier food than the average box lunch offers. The gingerbread pictured on this page is one part of a perfect answer. It’s light, velvety satisfying. It is well-blessed with homemade taste.

Try this tested recipe. It will make sufficient gingerbread for several generous lunch box servings plus enough for two dinners for a family of four. And it’s easy to bake when you use home-type flour like Kitchen Craft.

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Old-Fashioned Gingersnaps / Gammeldagse Ingefærkjeks

An old spicy cookie recipe found on bhg.com
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Gingersnaps, also called ginger biscuits, are a type of cookie. The name comes from the fact these cookies traditionally are very crispy and make a snapping sound when eaten. Gingersnaps are a derivation of gingerbread and were invented hundreds of years ago. People in colonial times enjoyed these cookies, both in European countries and in America.

Origins

Ginger is derived from the ginger root and is native to parts of South Asia; historians believe it was first cultivated in India. Ginger was prized for its valuable effects on health and imported for its medicinal uses before it was utilized for cooking purposes. Ginger found its way to ancient Rome, then to Africa and the Caribbean. In medieval times, ginger was imported to Europe in preserved form to be used in baking treats such as cakes and cookies.

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Switchel; the Original Energy-Ade

An 18th century energydrink found on savouringthepast.netSwitchel - The Original Energy-Ade_post

Jas. Townsend and Son who runs SavouringThePast writes What do you drink if you’re worn out and need a little kick? An Ade, soda, an energy boost? In the 18th century, before supermarkets had shelves lined with this stuff,  many people drank a delicious beverage called Switchel.

Beverages similar to Switchel date all the way back to ancient Greece, and were drank all the way around the world. This recipe was typical of those popular in America from New England all the way to the Caribbean.

Of course regional influences made for local flares. In Vermont, for example, Switchel was made with Maple Syrup and mixed with oatmeal. (The oatmeal was eaten as a snack once the beverage was finished.) While in Trinidad the drink was almost always mixed with special branches from the quararibea turbinata plant. (Also known as the swizzlestick tree.)

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Finnish Rye Bread / Finsk Rugbrød

A traditional Finnish recipe found on aperitif.no
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There are a multitude of recipes for round flat bread like this to be found all over Scandinavia. Some made with wholemeal flour and some with finer flour like these ones. If you’ve followed this blog for a while you will have come across a few of them all ready -Ted 🙂

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Dravle from Kvinnherad / Dravle fra Kvinnherad

A traditional recipe found on bygdekvinnelaget.no438_Dravle fra Kvinnherad_post

Dravle is traditional party food from Kvinnherad in the western part of Norway. Recipes vary a lot from place to place, but it was and is common to serve dravle with milk cakes and potato cakes.

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