Honey and Mustard Sauce / Honning- og Sennepssaus

A medieval spicy sauce recipe found at cookit.e2bn.org
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Mustard was much used by the Romans and later was very popular with the Anglo Saxons. It grew locally and so was cheap. It could be used to makes sauces for meat and fish as well as dressings for salads. It helped to preserve other foods as well as having healthy properties of its own.

The sauces were generally made from a mixture of ground mustard seeds, vinegar, wine and often honey, with spices or other flavourings added according to what people liked.

They could then be stored for several weeks. Mustard’s ‘hotness’ gets less after it is mixed and kept for a few days, which may account for the strength of the sauces often made – which would be much too hot for most of us today.

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Hernekeitto – Finnish Pea Soup / Finsk Ertesuppe

A classic Finnish soup recipe found in “Kullinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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All the Nordic countries have their own version of pea soup as do most countries in the world I guess. This is the Finnish take on the soup – Ted

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Basic Homemade Country Mustard / Grunnleggende Hjemmelaget Landsens Sennep

An easy condiment recipw found on homecooking.about.com
Basic Homemade Country Mustard / Grunnleggende Hjemmelaget Landsens Sennep

Mustard is one of those condiments that comes in many flavors, textures, and varieties. While most Americans are all too familiar with the smooth, bright yellow store-bought varieties, it would be a shame not to experience the more complex flavors of homemade varieties. If you’re new to mustard-making, this recipe is a great place to start. This basic country mustard is a pungent, grainy, all-purpose mustard that uses both coarsely ground mustard seeds and mustard powder.

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Cheese Sandwich with Bacon, Pear and Caramelized Onions / Ostesmørbrød med, Bacon, Pære og Karamellisert Løk

A greatrecipe for cheese sandwiches found on aperitif.no
Cheese Sandwich with Bacon, Pear and Caramelized Onions

When cheese sandwiches are made with so much love as these you got real party fare. This recipe has that little extra that turns you into a kitchen hero.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 8

The Christmas Recipes – Part 8

3 Variations On Mustard / Sennep i 3 Utgaver
3 Variations On Mustard / Sennep i 3 Utgaver

Spicy Cranberry Jam / Krydret Tyttebærsyltetøy
Spicy Cranberry Jam / Krydret Tyttebærsyltetøy

The Christmas Recipes – Part 5

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Lamb Ribs With Mashed Root Vegetables /Pinnekjøtt Med Rotmos
Lamb Ribs With Mashed Root Vegetables /
Pinnekjøtt Med Rotmos

Mustard Herring / Sennepsild
Mustard Herring / Sennepsild

Shrimp Toast Lyngør / Reketoast Lyngør

A sandwich recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Food Enjoyment Like Never Before) published by
Skandinavisk Presse as in 1977

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Lyngør is a village area on a group of small islands in the municipality of Tvedestrand in Aust-Agder county, off the southeast coast of Norway. The village is about 12 kilometres (7.5 miles) northeast of Tvedestrand city center and also 12 kilometres (7.5 miles) south of the city of Risør.

lyngørPreviously a popular home for sea captains, the village is accessible only by boat, has no cars, and is known for its scenic harbour and charming wooden houses. It is recognized as one of the best-preserved communities in Europe. Most of the buildings are now summer homes, but there are about 70 permanent, year-round residents. A hugely popular destination in the summer months, it has in later years struggled to maintain a stable permanent population. The community has a sail-making factory, a few restaurants that are open during the tourist season, and a famous general store.

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Mussels in Dill Sauce / Blåskjell i Dillsaus

A recipe for a cold shellfish dish found in “Alt om Urter”
(All About Herbs) published by Den Norske Bokklubb in 1985
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Most Scandinavians are crazy when it comes to shellfish of any kind and I’m noe exception. I’ve posted lots of recipes for mussels already. Here’s another one – Ted 😉

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Smoked Salmon on Mustard-Chive and Dill Butter Toasts / Røkt Laks på Sennep,Gressløk og Dillsmør Toasts

A great snack or starter found on food52.com
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The History of Condiments

condiments_01Since ancient times people have used condiments to enhance their food. The first condiment was salt. Salt has always been used both as a preservative and to enhance the flavor of food. Vinegar has also been used since ancient times. Its name is probably derived from the French words vin aiger meaning sour wine. (Vinegar was used as a medicine as well as a food).

The Romans liked condiments and they made many sauces for their food. One of the most common was a fish sauce called liquamen. The Romans also grew mustard and they introduced it into the parts of Europe they conquered. They also made mint sauce.

condiments_02In the Middle Ages mustard was a popular condiment in Europe. At first English mustard consisted of coarse powder and it was not very strong. However in 1720 a Mrs Clements of Durham began making a much smoother mustard powder. When mixed with water to make paste it was very hot but it proved to be popular and Durham became a center of the mustard industry. (For centuries mustard was used as a medicine as well as a food).

In the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries new condiments were invented. Pesto sauce was invented in 16th century Italy. Furthermore new sauces were invented in the 17th century including bechamel and chasseur. Chutney comes from India. It was first exported to England in the 17th century. Soy sauce, which was invented in China reached Europe in the 17th century and by the mid-18th century it was popular in Britain.

condiments_03According to one story a French chef first made mayonnaise in 1756. However there are many stories about where it comes from. Hollandaise sauce was also first recorded in the mid-18th century. Ketchup began life as a Chinese fish sauce called ke-tsiap. The name was gradually changed to ketchup and in Britain people added other ingredients instead of fish. In the 18th century they began adding tomatoes. Sauces similar to tartar sauce were made in the Middle Ages but ‘modern’ tartar sauce was first made in the 1800s

condiments_04In the 19th century with the Industrial Revolution condiments began to be mass-produced in factories. Tomato ketchup was a best seller and HP sauce was invented at the end of the 19th century. Meanwhile Worcester sauce was invented in Worcester in 1835 by John Lea and William Perrins. Horseradish sauce went on sale in bottles in the USA around 1860. Salad cream was invented in 1914.

As well as sauces people have also looked for ways to sweeten their food. Since the time of the Ancient Egyptians and probably before people have kept bees for honey. Over condiments_05the centuries honey was very valuable and it was sometimes used as a currency or it was given as a tribute to a conqueror. Since ancient times people have also made an alcoholic drink called mead from honey.

Sugar cane first grew in South Asia. Later the Arabs and Europeans grew sugar cane. At the end of the 15th century sugar cane was taken to the New World. Sugar was first made from sugar beet in the 18th century. A German chemist called Andreas Marggraf was the first person to make sugar from beet in 1747. Saccharine was invented in 1879 by Constantine Fahlberg.

Text from localhistories.org

Corn Dogs / Innbakte Frityrstekte Pølser

A fairground classic recipe found on lostrecipesfound.com
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Here’s a little-known fact: Early corn-dog purveyor Ed Waldmire, Jr., wanted to call his corn-dog stand “The Crusty Cur”….his wife convinced him to change the name to “Cozy Pup.”  Like most other American fried-food-on-a-stick, batter-fried weiner wands have state fair connections.

Vaudeville actors Carl and Neil Fletcher abandoned their Dallas song-and-dance act tent show in 1938 when the Texas State Fair offered them the chance to operate a food booth. The two had read about a man in the Oaklawn neighbourhood of Dallas who was baking corn-battered hotdogs in moulds, and the idea intrigued them, so the brothers set out to improve on the product. They perfected their batter-dipped and fried corn dog in time for the 1942 Texas State Fair.

Easy, portable and quick, corn dogs soon became fast-food-restaurant darlings. Cozy Dog Drive-in in Springfield, IL claims first-to-market status (1946) but restaurateur Dave Barham started selling at Hot Dog on a Stick in Santa Monica, CA, that same year.

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Coney Island Chili Dogs / Coney Island Chilipølser i Brød

A classic chillidog recipe found on lostrecipesfound.com
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In Southeastern Michigan, “Coney Island” refers to 24-hour diners, and, the specific kind of chili-topped, grilled hot-dogs those diners serve. Invented in 1914 at a Jackson, Michigan joint called Todoroff’s Original Coney Island.

The dogs–with their beanless, meaty chili (or “sauce” as it’s called in Michigan), were so popular, many other operators soon spun their own versions.

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French Pork Chops / Franske Koteletter

A dinner recipe found in”Husmorens Store Kokebok”
(The Housewife’s Big Cook Book) published in 1963
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Some old cook books have no ingredients lists in their recipes, just an explanation on how to prepare the dishes. “Husmorens Store Kokebok” is one of these. But don’t let that scare you, the recipes are relatively simple and anyone who know their way around a kitchen can follow them easily – Ted

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Cider and Pork Casserole / Eplesider og Svinekjøttgryte

A  classic recipe found on about.com/britishfood
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Put pork and cider together with a little mustard and cream and you have a delicious, lovely and light casserole.

This Cider and Pork casserole is very easy to make and makes a lovely lunch dish, or main course for dinner or an alternative Sunday Lunch. Serve with seasonal vegetables and new potatoes, delicious.

Feel free to change the herbs in this dish. I love the addition of a hefty dose of French tarragon as this balances very well with the punch of the cider and the bite of the mustard. If you wish to add your favourite herb please read the notes at the end of the recipe.

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Lincolnshire Pork with Potatoes / Lincolnshire Svinekjøtt og Poteter

A traditional British dish found on goodtoknow.co.uk
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A traditional British dish, packed with strong flavours. Try serving the pork with homemade apple sauce for a perfect Sunday lunch.

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