Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

This pea soup that originates from Stryn was widely served during harvesting and threshing back in the old days. All vegetables that was available was generally used, as well as the meat or flesh that could be used. The beef, mutton or pork was usually smoked, dried or salted. It was standard to serve the soup with flatbread and always with boiled potatoes. The flatbread was usually dipped in the broth during the meal.

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Round Crispbread / Runde Knekkebrød

A recipe for Norwegian crispbread found on brodogkorn.no
Round Crispbread / Runde Knekkebrød

These round crispbread are both wholesome, delicious and easy to make with wheat and whole wheat. They are great for breakfast with your favourite spread and keeps you feeling nice and full until lunch.

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Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

A traditional Norvegian lefse recipe found on brodogkorn.no
Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

Potato Lefse is made from boiled potatoes, sour cream, cream, butter and flour, and baked on a griddle. Serve with your dinner, for lutefisk or other traditional Norwegian food like cured meat or bring it on a hike with nice toppings.

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The History of Lutefisk

An article found on whatscookingamerica.netLutefisk_01

It is said that about half the Norwegians who immigrated to America came in order to escape the hated lutefisk and the other half came to spread the gospel of lutefisk’s wonderfulness.

– Norwegian-American saying

Lutefisk History

Lutefisk (pronounced lewd-uh-fisk) is dried cod that has been soaked in a lye solution for several days to rehydrate it.  It is rinsed with cold water to remove the lye, then boiled or baked, and then served with butter, salt, and pepper.

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The finished lutefisk usually is the consistency of Jello.  It is also called lyefish, and in the United States, Norwegian-Americans traditionally serve it for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  In many Norwegian homes, lutefisk takes the place of the Christmas turkey.  In Minnesota and Wisconsin, you can find lutefisk in local food stores and even at some restaurants. It is a food that you either love or hate, and, as some people say, “Once a year is probably enough!”

During the fall in Wisconsin, people watch their local newspapers for announcements of lutefisk suppers, which are usually held in Norwegian churches.  Usually every Norwegian church will host at least one lutefisk supper between October and the end of the year.  The dinners have become so popular that lovers of this special cod dish drive great distances, and these are not just people of Scandinavian descent.

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The history of lutefisk dates back to the Vikings.  On one occasion, according to one legend, plundering Vikings burned down a fishing village, including the wooden racks with drying cod.  The returning villagers poured water on the racks to put out the fire.  Ashes covered the dried fish, and then it rained.  The fish buried in the ashes in the ashes thus became soaked in a lye slush.  Later the villagers were surprised to see that the dried fish had changed to what looked like fresh fish.  They rinsed the fish in water to remove the lye and make it edible, and then boiled it.  The story is that one particularly brave villager tasted the fish and declared it “not bad.”

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Norwegian-Americans believe that lutefisk was brought by their ancestors on the ships when they came to America, and that it was all they had to eat.  Today the fish is celebrated in ethnic and religious celebrations and is linked with hardship and courage.


In general I love traditional Norwegian food, both the food eaten during celebrating Christmas and the traditional food eaten the year round. Having said as much that love does not embrace lutefisk, but if it is served with enough crispy bacon and mushy peas as it usually is here in Norway I do eat it.

Ted
Winking smile

Bacon Pancakes / Fleskepannekaker

A classic Norwegian dinner recipe found in “Gode Gamle Oppskrifter” (Good Old Recipes) published by Gyldendal in 1991
Bacon Pancakes / Fleskepannekaker

The childhood dream in the old days for many Norwegian children was to eat bacon pancakes as often as they wanted, and as many as possible. But pancakes takes time to cook, and there were usually several people round the table, so the cakes had often dispensed equally between the them.

One hardly ever hear of people eating bacon pancakes  any more. That’s a pity really, because it is a delicious dish, particularly served with lingonberry jam as suggested in the recipe – Ted

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Bee Stings / Bistikk

A traditional Norwegian cake recipe found in “Gjærbakst”
(Yeast Baking) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979

Bee Stings / Bistikk

Please don’t ask me how a cake can end up with a name like Bee Sting. I can’t imagine anyone finding anything remotely positive with getting a bee sting yet the cake is absolutely delicious. It’s a strange world is all I can say – Ted 😉

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Brown Sticks / Brune Pinner

A traditional Norwegian cookie recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
Brune pinner_post

These cookies are often baked for Christmas in Norway, but many have the sense to enjoy them the year round. They were not part of my mother’s seven sorts baked for the holiday season, but I’ve had the good fortune to be offered them elsewhere both as a kid and as an addult. Delicious stuff I can tell you – Ted

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Frikassé On Smoked Pork Knuckle / Frikassé På Røkt Svineknoke

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
Frikase på røkt svineknoke - Real husmannskost_post

This traditional Norwegian dish is incredibly delicious winter food! Pork knuckle is very easy to prepare and if you cook the knuckle the night before you’ll use max 20 minutes to cook this delicious dinner.

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Grandma’s Oat Biscuits / Bestemors Havrekjeks

A classic Norwegian biscuit  recipe found on
furkunnjmat.no via alleoppskrifter.no
Grandma’s Oat Biscuits / Bestemors Havrekjeks

Oat biscuits have been staple food in Norway for ages and someone’s granny obviously made some pretty nice ones as this recipe ended up on one of Norway’s most popular recipe sites – Ted

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Roasted Salmon With Maitre d’Hotel Butter / Ristet Laks med Maitre d’Hôtel-Smør

A classic Norwegian restaurant dish found in “Festmat”
(Partyfood) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1992
Roasted Salmon With Maitre d’Hotel Butter / Ristet Laks med Maitre d’Hôtel-Smør

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Barley Cordial Soup / Byggryns Saftsuppe

A traitional Norwegian sweet soup recipe found on bygdekvinnelaget.no
Barley Cordial Soup / Byggryns Saftsuppe

A nourishing and hearty soup. Often used both before or after the main course during the week in Norway in the old days.

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Velvety Oat Porridge / Fløyelsmyk Havregrøt

A classic Norwegian porridge recipe found on
lindastuhaug.blogg.no via alleoppskrifter.no
Fløyelsmyk havregrøt_post

For many Norwegians oat porridge is a good start to the day, but it might as well be enjoyed for lunch, dinner or supper. Adjust the batch according to your needs, and feel free to use another topping like fruit, berries, nuts, cottage cheese or similar.

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The Story of The Norwegian Brown Cheese

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This is how the Gudbrand’s Valley cheese was born approximately
150 years ago

Long Traditions

The brown cheese is a distinctive Norwegian product with a long tradition. Sweet, rich, a slight taste of caramel and an unshakeable place in Norwegian hearts for generations.

The brown cheese originates from Solbråsetra in the Gudbrand’s Valley

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Referrences to whey cheeses was mentioned already in 1646  in Christer Jenssøn’s Glossary as “quite lovely” but brown cheese as we know it today was born in 1863 on Solbråsetra.

Rowdy Goats

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It started with some rowdy goats. The farm owner on Solbråsetra thought his goats made too much mischief, and would therefore not have them on his farm.

Anne Hov mixed cream and whey

So in the absence of goat milk, the farmer’s daughter Anne Hov attempted to make cheese by mixing cream with the whey mixture, instead of goat’s milk.

That using valuable cream to make cheese instead of butter, was by some seen as a waste, but it was only until they tasted the results. It tasted lovely!

The Gudbrand’s Valley mixed cheese

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When Anne Hov a few years later married a man owning his own farm, she developed the recipe further. Unlike her father Anne’s husband found that goats were great animals, so this time she perfected the recipe by adding a little goat’s milk as well as cream.

Anne Hov’s new brown cheese recipe was a hit and quickly spread to neighboring farms, and within a few years the rest of the country was talking about  the gorgeous “Gudbrand’s Valley mixed cheese”.

The most Norwegian of the Norwegian

In 1908 the first industrial steam dairy making brown cheese was built and today, 150 years later the brown cheese represents the most Norwegian of the Norwegian.

So thanks to Anne Hov! And thank God for rowdy goats.

Text and images from tine.no

Norwegian Soft Lefse / Mørlefse

A classic Norwegian lefse recipe found on brodogkorn.no
Mørlefse_post

Soft lefse is soft and sweet and extra nice with cheese. They are cooked on a griddle, and made with sour milk, sour cream, butter and golden syrup. You can also make a wholemeal version that makes for great hiking food.

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Shrimp Toast Lyngør / Reketoast Lyngør

A sandwich recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Food Enjoyment Like Never Before) published by
Skandinavisk Presse as in 1977

reketoast lyngør_post

Lyngør is a village area on a group of small islands in the municipality of Tvedestrand in Aust-Agder county, off the southeast coast of Norway. The village is about 12 kilometres (7.5 miles) northeast of Tvedestrand city center and also 12 kilometres (7.5 miles) south of the city of Risør.

lyngørPreviously a popular home for sea captains, the village is accessible only by boat, has no cars, and is known for its scenic harbour and charming wooden houses. It is recognized as one of the best-preserved communities in Europe. Most of the buildings are now summer homes, but there are about 70 permanent, year-round residents. A hugely popular destination in the summer months, it has in later years struggled to maintain a stable permanent population. The community has a sail-making factory, a few restaurants that are open during the tourist season, and a famous general store.

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