Potato Pancakes with Crispy Bacon / Potetkaker med Sprøstekt Flesk

A great breakfast recipe found in “Sunt og Godt” (Wholesome and Delicious) published by Det Beste in 1988Potetkaker med sptøstekt flesk_post

A simple mixture of potatoes and onions, here transformed into airy potato pancakes with a “crown” of crispy bacon. A lovey smell will spread in the kitchen while you cook them!

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The Goat Curry in William Thackeray’s “Vanity Fair” / Geitekarrien i William Thackerays “Forfengelighetens Marked”

A hot curry recipe found on theguardian.comThe goat curry in William Thackeray's Vanity Fair_post

“Give Miss Sharp some curry, my dear,” said Mr. Sedley, laughing. Rebecca had never tasted the dish before. “Do you find it as good as everything else from India?” said Mr. Sedley. “Oh, excellent!” said Rebecca, who was suffering tortures with the cayenne pepper. “Try a chili with it, Miss Sharp,” said Joseph, really interested. “A chili,” said Rebecca, gasping. “Oh yes!” She thought a chili was something cool, as its name imported, and was served with some. “How fresh and green they look,” she said, and put one into her mouth. It was hotter than the curry; flesh and blood could bear it no longer. She laid down her fork. “Water, for Heaven’s sake, water!” she cried.

Fra “Vanity Fair” av William Makepeace Thackeray

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Hernekeitto – Finnish Pea Soup / Finsk Ertesuppe

A classic Finnish soup recipe found in “Kullinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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All the Nordic countries have their own version of pea soup as do most countries in the world I guess. This is the Finnish take on the soup – Ted

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Hot Gipsy Tartlets / Varme Sigøyner-Tarteletter

A traditional gipsy recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Scandinavisk Presse in 1977

Hot Gipsy Tartlets / Varme Sigøyner-Tarteletter

Gypsy cuisine has been called “the little known soul food”. Gypsies have a rich and complicated identity and history, which is reflected in the delicious complexity of the food, and, like most things, it’s a lot better when you understand it. First, the word “Gypsy” is the term that gadjé (Rromanes for non-Romani people) have used to refer to Roma, the ethnic group originating in India around the eleventh century.

Gypsies divide food into two categories: “ordinary” and “auspicious” or “lucky” (baxtalo). Auspicious foods are believed to be particularly healthy for the body and soul, and these beliefs are likely rooted in Ayurveda, the traditional Hindu system of medicine that uses food, herbs, and yogic breathing to balance the body.

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Medieval Monday – Ember Day Tarts / Emberdags Terter

A meat free fasting day tart recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
headingMedieval Monday - Ember Day Tarts / Emberdags Terter

Four times every year in the Catholic calendar, there were “Ember Days” – consisting of a Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday – when meat was forbidden. Cheese and eggs, however, were allowed. An ‘Ember Day Tart’ therefore was a filling dish served instead of meat on these fasting days. The tarts in the recipe are a little like a sweet quiche.

The recipe uses galingale, it is well worth finding some as its aromatic taste is not easily replaced. You can use ginger as a substitute but this will give heat rather than a more rounded flavour.

The recipe was originally written down as follows:

‘Tart in embre day: take and parboile onynons; presse out the water & hewe hem smale;take brede & bray it in a mortar,and temper it up with ayren; do perto butter, safron, spice and salt and corans & a ltel sugar with powdor douce, and bake it in a trap,& serve it forth.’

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Jane Austen’s Beef And Stilton Pasties / Jane Austens Kjøtt Og Stilton Pasties

An afternoon tea pastie recipe from Jane Austen’s days
found on
Bite From The Past
Jane Austen’s Beef And Stilton Pastie / Jane Austen’s Kjøtt Og Stilton Pasties

The Girl who runs Bite From The Past writes: Bonnie Wise, one of the organizers of the festival and a member of the Jane Austen Society of North America, was kind enough to answer a few questions for me via email-and to send me two recipes for afternoon tea. Bonnie said this recipe is based on one found in Victoria Magazine called TeaTime Bliss.

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Faggots With Onion Gravy / Faggots Med Løksaus

A traditional British dinner recipe found on BBCgoodfood
Faggots With Onion Gravy / Faggots Med Løksaus

Just to clearify: Faggots are a traditional dish in the UK, especially South and Mid Wales and the Midlands of England. It is made from meat off-cuts and offal, especially pork. A faggot is traditionally made from pig’s heart, liver and fatty belly meat or bacon minced together, with herbs added for flavouring and sometimes bread crumbs.

Faggots originated as a traditional cheap food of ordinary country people in Western England, particularly west Wiltshire and the West Midlands. Their popularity spread from there, especially to South Wales in the mid-nineteenth century, when many agricultural workers left the land to work in the rapidly expanding industry and mines of that area.

Faggots are also known as “ducks” in the Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and Lancashire, often as “Savoury Ducks”. The first use of the term in print was in the Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser on Saturday June 3  1843, a news report of a gluttonous man who ate twenty of them.

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BBQ Hot Dog & Potato Packs / BBQ Pølse & Potet Pakker

A quick and simple foil pack recipe found on tasteofhome.com
headingBBQ Hot Dog & Potato Packs / BBQ Pølse & Potet Pakker

Aluminium foil is an absolute must when packing for a camping hike. Whether you packed a small gas cooker or you plan to do all your cooking on the campfire the foil will provide an easy and carefree way to prepare hot food. More recipes using foil will follow in this series – Ted  🙂

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Rouladen or Mock Birds / Roulade eller Benløse Fugler

A recipe from a short article in a series from the thirties
where Tinsel Town Royalties are pretending to cook   😉

Rouladen or Mock Birds / Roulade eller Benløse Fugler

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French Pot Roast / Fransk Grytestek

A dinner recipe found in”Husmorens Store Kokebok”
(The Housewife’s Big Cook Book) published in 1963
French Pot Roast / Fransk Grytestek

In the early sixties spaghetti started to turn up at Norwegian grocers. Some had heard of it before, a very few had tasted it, but most people hadn’t a clue about what to do with it. But did that stop them from buying it, far from. This new thing had to be tried. The result was as you can see from the picture, for years spaghetti was served in Norway as you would potatoes – Ted  😉

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Blandaball / Mixed Balls

A Norwegian fish speciality found in “God Mat Fra Sjøen”
(Great Food From The Sea) published by Gyldendal in 1984
Blandaball / Mixed Balls

This dish from Western Norway is for many, I must admit an acquired taste. My x-wife’s mother used to serve it quite often and quite honestly, it took me some time to appreciate it. Mixing ground fish, onion and potatoes may seem like a strange thing to do, but when you get used to it, it actually is quite delicious – Ted

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Meatloaf Fifties Style / Femtitalls Kjøttbrød

A typical dinner recipe from “God Og Billig Hverdagsmat”
(Nice And Inexpensive Everyday Food)
published  by N W Damm & Sønn in 1955

Meatloaf Fifties Style / Femtitalls Kjøttbrød

There is a delightful simplicity to the recipes in this book, completely free of all the show off vanity one finds in particularly cook books from the late eithties and early nineties.

This is straightforward everyday food presented simply and honestly, just like the Scandinavian fifites themselves. The recipe is from one of my mother’s cook books, now mine, and I’m very fond of it – Ted

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Beef à la Rydberg / Biff á la Rydberg

A classic Swedish dish found  in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978

Beef à la Rydberg / Biff á la Rydberg

This classic dish is from old Hotel Rydberg in Stockholm. A nice party dish when one is willing to go for beef fillet, because beef fillet is needed in this case. But one does not have to use the very finest fillets, since the meat should be cut into pieces.

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Scampi as in Greece / Scampi på Gresk

A delicious shelfish recipe found in “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance)
published in 1991

Scampi as in Greece / Scampi på Gresk

If you have been to Greece, you are probably recognising this dish. You can make either with scampi or with large prawns.

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Chicken Alexa / Kylling Alexa

A spicy chicken recipe found in “Fjærfe på Menyen”
(Poultry on the Menu) published by
Den Norske Bokklubben in 1984
Chicken Alexa / Kylling Alexa

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In context

Garam masala (Hindi: गरम मसाला, Punjabi: ਗਰਮ ਮਸਾਲਾ,Urdu: گرم مصالحہ‎, Bengali: গরম মসলা garam (“hot”) and masala (a mixture of spices)) is a blend of ground spices common in India, Pakistan, and other South Asian cuisines. It is used alone or with other seasonings. The word garam refers to “heating the body” in the Ayurvedic sense of the word, as these spices are believed to elevate body temperature in Ayurvedic medicine.

The composition of garam masala differs regionally, with many recipes across India according to regional and personal taste, and none is considered more authentic than others. The components of the mix are toasted, then ground together.

A typical Indian version of garam masala contains:

garammasala

Some recipes call for the spices to be blended with herbs, while others call for the spices to be ground with water, vinegar, coconut milk, or other liquids, to make a paste. In some recipes, ingredients including nuts, onions, or garlic may be added. Some recipes also call for small quantities of star anise, asafoetida, chili, stone flower (known as dagadphool), and kababchini (cubeb). The flavours may be carefully blended to achieve a balanced effect, or a single flavour may be emphasized. A masala may be toasted before use to release its flavours and aromas.