Baked Stuffed Tomatoes / Bakte Fylte Tomater

A lunch recipe found in “60 ways to Serve Star Ham”
published by  Armour Co in 1930

Baked Stuffed Tomatoes / Bakte Fylte Tomater

Text from the booklet: The only real rival of “Star” Ham is Armour’s “Star” Bacon. In uniform quality it is equally dependable for it has the same famous Fixed* Flavor. The mildness and sweetness of this choicest bacon are distinctive, As a breakfast delicacy, it is admittedly unsurpassed. Wherever finest foods are served – on dining cars, in prominent hotels and elsewhere – it is a familiar item on the menus.

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Gypsy Goulash / Sigøynergulasj

A typical sixties dish found in an additional attachment to
“Husmorens Kokebok” published by Norsk Kunstforlag in 1963
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Comment from the author of the cookbook: The name of this dish is from ancient times when the gypsies made goulash under primitive conditions.

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Breaded Chicken Schnitzels / Paneret kyllingeschnitzel

A dinner recipe found in “Bogen om Kyllinger”
(The Book About Chicken) published by Lademann in 1972

Breaded Chicken Schnitzels / Paneret kyllingeschnitzel

A schnitzel is meat, usually thinned by pounding with a meat tenderizer, that is fried in some kind of oil or fat. The term is most commonly used to refer to meats coated with flour, beaten eggs and bread crumbs, and then fried, but some variants such as Walliser Schnitzel are not breaded. Originating in Austria, the breaded schnitzel is popular in many countries and made using either veal, mutton, chicken, beef, turkey, reindeer, or pork. It is very similar to the French dish escalope.

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Crispy Potato Wedges / Sprø Potetbåter

A great potato recipe from “Spennende Mat” (Exiting Food)
published by Skandinavisk Presse in 1980

Crispy Potato Wedges / Sprø Potetbåter

These crispy roast potato wedges beats any of the frozen ones you are likely to find in your local shops! Fragrant herbal spices and a grilled Parmesan drissle makes them irresistible. These potato wedges are great with chicken or juicy meat.

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Gulyás-Soup / Gulyás-Suppe

A classic Hungarian soup recipe found in “Berømte Retter”
(Famoud Dishes) published by Ernst G Mortensens Forlag in 1970
Gulyás-Soup / Gulyás-Suppe

Goulash (Hungarian: gulyás [ˈɡujaːʃ]) is a soup or stew of meat and vegetables, seasoned with paprika and other spices. Originating from the medieval Kingdom of Hungary, goulash is also a popular meal in Central Europe, Eastern Europe, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Scandinavia and Southern Europe.

Its origin traces back to the 9th century to stews eaten by Hungarian shepherds. Back then, the cooked and flavored meat was dried with the help of the sun and packed into bags produced from sheep’s stomachs, needing only water to make it into a meal. It is one of the national dishes of Hungary and a symbol of the country.

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Nordic Dip / Nordisk Dipp

A flashback from the seventies found on “European Favourites” published by Collins in 1973
Nordic Dip / Nordisk Dipp

This may very well be a Nordic kind of dip from the early seventies. Paprika was high fashion among the cooking savoir faire back then and you risked getting celery in dishes where they far from belonged. Probably because some local health guru had sworn to its many benefits.

I can even remember a tv ad proclaiming celery’s magnificence as snacks. With this dip you could actually end up dipping pieces of celery in a dip containing celery. I’ve said it before, those were hard times back then.

To make it even worse, the horrid disco music  was lurking in the near future. A few years later you could actually risk sitting somewhere overdosing on celery listening to that horrible music. – Ted

Winking smile
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Luxury Chicken / Luksuskylling

A swell chicken recipe found in “Gryteretter” (Casseroles)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979
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Chicken is very suitable for casseroles. The meat is lean and mild and lends itself greatly for a large diversity of flavorings.

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Cevapcici – Yugoslavian Meatballs / Jugoslaviske Kjøttkaker

A classic dish from the Balkans found in “God Mat fra
Hele Verden” (Great Food From all over The World)
published in 1971

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Meatballs are found in all countries in many different varieties. In Yugoslavia they are usually formed in the shape of croquettes. The farce can be made from pure beef or a mixture of beef and veal or pork. The seasoning is hotter than we are used to in Western Europe. The meatballs should be sharply browned, but must not be cooked dry.

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Hungarian Chicken / Ungersk Kyckling

A recipe from Håkan Håkanson’s “Kunglig Spis”
(Royal Oven) published in 1982
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Håkan Håkansson writes: Hungarian chicken is a hearty, full-bodied dish with a colorful appearance. A nice alternative to the light and more spring like chicken dishes.

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